Center for     Biological     Diversity   

Revoke the Army Corps' License to Kill Cormorants

Double-crested cormorant

Making the right calls for conservation isn't always easy. But when thousands of animals' lives are on the line, those calls better be right.

That's why we must demand the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service revoke its permit for the U.S. Army Corps to kill more than 10,000 double-crested cormorants and destroy more than 26,000 cormorant nests on East Sand Island, near the mouth of the Columbia River. The government agencies are scapegoating these native birds for declines of imperiled salmon and steelhead -- but the real problem is mismanagement of the area's dams, which are disrupting fish runs.

A recently released document shows that the Service's own biologists found that fish eaten by the birds would have died anyway, consumed by other predators. It makes no sense, then, to kill cormorants. Doing so will not help endangered fish.

Urge the Service to revoke its kill permit and save these cormorants, whose population in the West is already down to less than 10 percent of historic levels due to drought, climate change and human control.


Please take action by May 1, 2017.

Photo of double-crested cormorant by cuatrok77/Flickr.

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