Center for     Biological     Diversity   

No More Toxic Pesticides in Minneapolis Parks

Minneapolis sculpture garden

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board has an integrated pest-management plan that has occasionally found ways to use natural pest control. But the city's strategy still heavily relies on the use of toxic fungicides, herbicides and insectides -- a policy that flies in the face of the best science and carries huge risk.

Pesticide exposure is associated with numerous health threats, especially to children, pregnant women and the elderly. And pesticides can harm nontarget wildlife, pets and beneficial insects like bees. For example, rodenticides used to control moles also kill foxes and raptors that would naturally control these rodents. And poisons applied to plants can seep into groundwater or get washed directly into local waterways and ponds.

Urge the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to adopt a pesticide-free management policy that's safe for people and wildlife.


Please take action by May 1, 2017. This alert is targeted for Minnesota residents only.

Photo of Minneapolis sculpture garden by Navin75/Flickr.

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