Speak Up for California Wolves
Center for     Biological     Diversity   

Speak Up for California Wolves

Wolf OR-25

Although California wolves are protected as an endangered species under federal and state law, they’re at risk of accidental killing due to hunting and trapping of other species in their habitat.

Please join the Center for Biological Diversity in urging wildlife officials to ban these practices in wolf territory in California.

Since 2011, 11 wolves have been confirmed in northern California: pioneering wolf OR-7, the seven-member Shasta wolf family, the newly confirmed Lassen pair, and lone wolf OR-25, who occasionally visits from Oregon. But a significant threat to wolf recovery in California is a state law allowing unlimited hunting of coyotes in areas that have been designated by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife as occupied or potential wolf territory. This creates the risk that a wolf might be mistaken for a coyote and shot, especially at night when visibility is low. In some circumstances state law also allows the use of lethal traps and snares to capture other species, but a wolf could just as easily fall victim to this deadly gear.

To address this the Center and Project Coyote filed an administrative petition last year with the commission seeking a ban on nighttime hunting and use of lethal traps in current and prospective wolf territory. Now we’re urging the commission to move quickly on this petition to prevent unintentional wolf killings.

Using the form on this page, urge California Fish and Game Commission members to ban night hunting of coyotes and the use of lethal traps and snares in wolf habitat.

This letter also includes a request that the commission raise trapping fees so that California’s trapping program, which isn't self-funding as required by law, no longer requires support from taxpayers who may not want their taxes going toward unlimited hunting and trapping of wildlife.


Please take action by Dec. 1, 2017.

Photo of wolf OR-25 courtesy Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

If you have cookies enabled in your Web browser, our action pages will remember your address information for 30 days.