End Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida
Center for     Biological     Diversity   

End Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida

Sinkhole in phosphate mine

Phosphate mining is one of the most destructive practices on Earth -- a brutal process that completely destroys landscapes and leaves behind 200-foot-tall, radioactive waste piles, which put people and wildlife, from gopher tortoises to sandhill cranes, at risk.

On Aug. 27, 2016, a sinkhole opened under one of these waste piles, causing more than 200 million gallons of contaminated wastewater to enter the Floridan Aquifer. It's not the first time the state's main source of drinking water has been imperiled by the phosphate industry, nor is it likely to be the last.

Mosaic (the largest phosphate mining company in Florida) wants to dig up an additional 50,000 acres of the state's beautiful, biodiverse lands, creating more radioactive waste. But this incident shows that Mosaic can't even handle the radioactive waste it currently generates.

It's time for us to stand against this dangerous, destructive practice. Tell your elected officials to do everything in their power to end the blight of phosphate mining in Florida.


Please take action by Oct. 23, 2017.

Photo of Florida phosphate mine sinkhole by Hannah Connor, Center for Biological Diversity.

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