Protect Wildlife From Risky Development in Flood Areas
Center for     Biological     Diversity   

Protect Wildlife From Risky Development in Flood Areas

Bird after Hurrican Irma

A new bill in Congress that provides much-needed disaster relief to the victims of this past summer's hurricanes and California wildfires has a toxic rider attached to it that would itself spell disaster for wildlife across the country, from Pacific salmon to Florida Key deer.

Please call Oregon Rep. Peter DeFazio and Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley to demand they strip this language from the disaster-relief bill (H.R. 4667).

Rep. Peter DeFazio: (202) 225-6416
Sen. Jeff Merkley: (202) 224-3753
Sen. Ron Wyden: (202) 224-5244

Here's a sample call script.

Hi, my name is _____, and I live in _____.  I'm calling to urge you to stand up for wildlife and oppose a provision in H.R. 4667 or any similar bill that would absolve FEMA of its responsibilities under the Endangered Species Act. The Act is our nation's most successful environmental law, and it's shameful for lawmakers to use emergency relief for disaster victims as an opportunity to weaken federal protections for wildlife.

Background Info

H.R. 4667 provides much-needed disaster relief to the victims of this past summer's hurricanes and California wildfires. But in a cynical move, Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) is joining up with the Trump administration to push for a provision that allows FEMA to ignore harms to endangered species when it subsidizes new developments through the National Flood Insurance Program. The language would exempt private flood-control projects from Endangered Species Act requirements and remove FEMA's legal obligation to safeguard wildlife.

Building in the most flood-prone, storm-prone areas makes little sense — and killing endangered species and destroying their homes in the process is even worse. Tell your reps that this legislation is wrong and it's shameful that lawmakers are using emergency relief for disaster victims as an opportunity to weaken federal protections for wildlife.


Please take action by March 22, 2018.

Photo of bird after Hurricane Irma by Mark Yokoyama/Flickr.

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