Center for Biological Diversity

Current Actions

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  • Time Is Running Out for Vaquitas — Can You Help?
    Vaquitas

    Fewer than 30 vaquitas are left in Mexico's northern Gulf of California. And experts have said that if the Mexican government doesn't quickly enact a permanent ban on the use of all gillnets, the vaquita will be extinct in less than two years.

    For decades this small porpoise has been killed in gillnets used to catch shrimp for sale in the United States. And more recently, vaquitas have died in gillnets used to illegally catch totoaba, an endangered fish whose swim bladder is prized in Asia.

    You can shift the tide for vaquitas. Using the form on this page, urge Amazon to join the growing list of retailers refusing to buy or sell Mexican shrimp until a real and permanent gillnet ban is implemented and enforced.

    In June Mexico announced a rule to rein in gillnet fishing in the vaquita's range. But it isn't enough. The plan exempts two fisheries from a full ban and fails to halt the possession, sale and manufacture of these nets in the region.
     
    There's still time to save vaquitas. Just last week Trader Joe's agreed to join the Mexican shrimp boycott. Tell Amazon to sign on too and help keep up the pressure.

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    Carolina madtom catfish

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  • Pledge to Protect America’s Oceans and Marine Wildlife From Trump
    The Fight Is On.

    I pledge to protect America’s oceans and marine wildlife from Trump and his plan to radically expand offshore drilling to every U.S. coast.
    Read More

  • Speak Up for Marbled Murrelets
    Juveline marbled murrelet

    The marbled murrelet is an iconic Oregon bird that nests in old-growth forests and forages at sea. Although it's been protected as a threatened species since the 1990s at both the state and federal level, murrelet populations continue to decline.

    Add your voice to those calling for stronger protections for murrelets before it's too late.

    Murrelets are in immediate danger of extinction due to logging in their habitat, climate change and declines in the ocean fish they eat. They must be upgraded under the Oregon state Endangered Species Act from threatened to endangered. Fortunately, on Feb. 9 state wildlife officials will consider a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity and allies to do just this.

    California and Washington have already recognized the murrelet as endangered. Now it's time for Oregon to do the same.

    Take a moment right now to urge decision-makers to grant the strongest protections possible to this unique Northwest seabird.

  • Make the Call to Save Gray Wolves
    Gray wolf

    Even after the recent government shutdown, Republicans in Congress have no qualms about continuing to hijack the funding process to pursue their fanatic ideologies. They're continuing their war against our nation's most iconic species. This time they've added riders to the 2018 budget that would gut the Endangered Species Act.

    One of the riders would strip critical protections from thousands of gray wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region. This would condemn these important predators to slaughter through cruel hunting methods.

    We've recently seen how easily a bad deal can transpire in Congress. Please — call your members of Congress today and demand that they oppose any provisions in the 2018 budget that would undermine the Endangered Species Act.

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____, and I live in ____. I'm calling to urge you to stand up for wolves and other imperiled wildlife and oppose the harmful anti-Endangered Species Act provisions in the 2018 appropriations bills. The Act is our nation's most successful environmental law and has saved more than 99 percent of species under its protection from extinction and put hundreds more on the path to recovery. Any attempts to dismantle the Act or undermine protections for imperiled species should be rejected.

  • North Carolina: Stop This Highway Expansion
    Carolina madtom catfish

    The North Carolina Department of Transportation wants to add a 28-mile-long toll road to Interstate 540 in Wake County, but it would be a disaster from start to finish.

    It would be the most expensive highway project in the state's history. It would worsen the traffic congestion it seeks to improve. And it would run over scores of Swift Creek tributaries that are home to imperiled wildlife, including mussels, salamanders and Carolina madtoms.
     
    Using the form on this page, send a letter to state officials urging them to scrap this destructive boondoggle.

    The toll road would waste billions of taxpayer dollars and wouldn't do much to improve drive time. However, wildlife would pay with habitat loss and potential extinction.

    Act now to demand that state officials protect North Carolina's wildlife by scrapping this senseless project.

  • Protect Wildlife From Risky Development in Flood Areas
    Bird after Hurrican Irma

    A new bill in Congress that provides much-needed disaster relief to the victims of this past summer's hurricanes and California wildfires has a toxic rider attached to it that would itself spell disaster for wildlife across the country, from Pacific salmon to Florida Key deer.

    Please call Oregon Rep. Peter DeFazio and Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley to demand they strip this language from the disaster-relief bill (H.R. 4667).

    Rep. Peter DeFazio: (202) 225-6416
    Sen. Jeff Merkley: (202) 224-3753
    Sen. Ron Wyden: (202) 224-5244

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is _____, and I live in _____.  I'm calling to urge you to stand up for wildlife and oppose a provision in H.R. 4667 or any similar bill that would absolve FEMA of its responsibilities under the Endangered Species Act. The Act is our nation's most successful environmental law, and it's shameful for lawmakers to use emergency relief for disaster victims as an opportunity to weaken federal protections for wildlife.

    Background Info

    H.R. 4667 provides much-needed disaster relief to the victims of this past summer's hurricanes and California wildfires. But in a cynical move, Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) is joining up with the Trump administration to push for a provision that allows FEMA to ignore harms to endangered species when it subsidizes new developments through the National Flood Insurance Program. The language would exempt private flood-control projects from Endangered Species Act requirements and remove FEMA's legal obligation to safeguard wildlife.

    Building in the most flood-prone, storm-prone areas makes little sense — and killing endangered species and destroying their homes in the process is even worse. Tell your reps that this legislation is wrong and it's shameful that lawmakers are using emergency relief for disaster victims as an opportunity to weaken federal protections for wildlife.

  • Tell the Air Force: Don't Bomb Bighorn Sheep
    Desert bighorn sheep

    Encompassing 1.6 million acres of pristine Mojave Desert, the Desert National Wildlife Refuge was designated in 1936 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to protect the largest herd of desert bighorn sheep in the southwestern United States. The refuge is right in Las Vegas's backyard, with the highest peaks of the Sheep Range visible from the Strip.

    The U.S. Air Force wants to take almost all of this precious land for military training and bomb tests. Will you send an email today, telling the Air Force that you oppose this land grab?

    The Air Force is eyeing almost 1.2 million acres of the refuge for an expansion of the Nevada Test and Training Range. This expansion would involve building roads, fencing and air strips, and would cause other significant impacts within areas currently managed as wilderness. The land grab would also eliminate access to an enormous swath of the desert, forever taking these public lands out of public hands.

    Speak up for bighorn sheep, desert tortoise and other wildlife. Tell the Air Force you do not want the Desert National Wildlife Refuge appropriated for bomb tests.

  • Protect Wildlife From Risky Development in Flood Areas
    Bird after Hurrican Irma

    A new bill in Congress that provides much-needed disaster relief to the victims of this past summer's hurricanes and California wildfires has a toxic rider attached to it that would itself spell disaster for wildlife across the country, from Pacific salmon to Florida Key deer.

    Please call Oregon Rep. Peter DeFazio and Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley to demand they strip this language from the disaster-relief bill (H.R. 4667).

    Rep. Peter DeFazio: (202) 225-6416
    Sen. Jeff Merkeley: (202) 224-3753
    Sen. Ron Wyden: (202) 224-5244

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is _____, and I live in _____.  I'm calling to urge you to stand up for wildlife and oppose a provision in H.R. 4667 or any similar bill that would absolve FEMA of its responsibilities under the Endangered Species Act. The Act is our nation's most successful environmental law, and it's shameful for lawmakers to use emergency relief for disaster victims as an opportunity to weaken federal protections for wildlife.

    Background Info

    H.R. 4667 provides much-needed disaster relief to the victims of this past summer's hurricanes and California wildfires. But in a cynical move, Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) is joining up with the Trump administration to push for a provision that allows FEMA to ignore harms to endangered species when it subsidizes new developments through the National Flood Insurance Program. The language would exempt private flood-control projects from Endangered Species Act requirements and remove FEMA's legal obligation to safeguard wildlife.

    Building in the most flood-prone, storm-prone areas makes little sense — and killing endangered species and destroying their homes in the process is even worse. Tell your reps that this legislation is wrong and it's shameful that lawmakers are using emergency relief for disaster victims as an opportunity to weaken federal protections for wildlife.

  • Protect Sage Grouse From Fracking, Drilling and Mining
    Greater sage grouse

    The U.S. Forest Service is reconsidering land-use plans for greater-sage-grouse habitat across six western states. Unfortunately Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has made it clear he intends to gut these already weak plans to make it even easier for corporations to frack, drill and mine in the birds' habitat on public lands.

    Greater sage grouse are completely dependent on intact sagebrush steppe for survival. Over the past 200 years, agriculture, oil and gas drilling, livestock grazing and development have reduced their range by nearly half, and their populations have steadily declined. Zinke's "drill first, ask later" agenda threatens to hasten the loss of sagebrush habitat and accelerate the bird's trajectory toward extinction.

    Using the form on this page, tell the Forest Service that greater sage grouse urgently need increased protections consistent with science, including an end to all new oil and gas drilling in their habitat.

  • Get Oil Money Out of California Politics
    Rodeo San Francisco Refinery

    Over the last 10 years Big Oil spent more than $266 million to influence California state legislators on energy policy. Because of this spending, state policies not only fail to tackle our oil drilling head on, but actually encourage production. It's time to get fossil fuel industry money out of California's government, policy, and politics.

    California is the nation's third-largest oil-producing state and extracts some of the most climate-polluting oil on the planet. Our state can't be a true climate leader without cleaning up the dirty oil production within our borders.

    Take action today. Sign this petition urging California's elected officials to stop taking money from the oil industry and instead prioritize public health and our collective future.

  • This Saved Wolves. Could It Save Grizzlies, Too?
    Yellowstone grizzly bear

    In June the Trump administration took Yellowstone-area grizzly bears off the list of animals protected by the Endangered Species Act. But there's been a big problem with the legality of that decision that's at last being addressed — and it could save these bears from dying in cruel, state-sponsored trophy hunts.

    Using the form on this page, tell the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to act on this evidence and reverse its earlier decision to stop protecting grizzlies.

    The Service is asking the public to weigh in on the legality of its delisting rule because of a recent case in the D.C. Court of Appeals. The D.C. court rightly voided a rule stripping protections from Great Lakes wolves because of the harm that rule would cause other recovering wolf populations. The flaws are identical to those in the grizzly bear rule.

    Take a minute to tell the Service it can't paper over these legal flaws and must restore protection to Yellowstone's grizzlies. The comment period closes on Monday, Jan. 8 — so please send a letter today.

  • Stop Trump's Plan to Expand Drilling Off U.S. Coasts
    Offshore drilling platform

    Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has announced plans to dramatically expand offshore oil drilling in all oceans along U.S. coasts. This would include allowing new oil leasing along California's shores for the first time in more than 30 years and in the remote Arctic.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to Secretary Zinke urging him to scrap this destructive plan.

    The draft proposal for offshore leasing over the next five years shows that the Trump administration is serious about giving the fossil fuel industry exactly what it wants: unrestricted access to oil and gas reserves buried deep under our oceans. If allowed to stand, the plan will hurt coastal communities and wildlife — from polar bears to blue whales — and risk even more oil spills and sea-level rise. We can't let that happen.

    Act now to demand that Secretary Zinke protect our oceans and climate by scrapping this plan.

  • Urgent: Make a Call for Oregon's Wolves
    Wolf

    The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has proposed revisions to the state wolf plan that are counter to science — and counter to the values of the overwhelming majority of Oregonians.

    These revisions would make it easier for the state to kill wolves for conflicts with livestock and would even open the door to wolf hunting and trapping. And because the revisions are still being drafted, the final version could strip even more protections from wolves.

    So far Gov. Kate Brown has been silent about these developments. She needs to hear from you that it's time for her to get involved.

    Please call Gov. Brown on Tuesday, Dec. 19, at (503) 378-4582. Use the script below to tell her to ensure that the wolf plan prioritizes conservation and science over killing and special interests.


    Hi, my name is               and I live in              , Oregon.

    The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has proposed revisions to the state wolf plan that are counter to science and the values of most Oregonians.

    These revisions make it easier to kill wolves, even though science says killing wolves doesn't solve conflicts between wolves and livestock and can even increase the risk of more conflicts. Killing wolves also decreases social tolerance for wolves and increases poaching.

    The revisions also would open the door to wolf hunting and trapping, even though a recent poll showed 72 percent of Oregonians do not support wolf hunting.

    No conservation organization supports the wolf plan revisions; in fact, based on testimony at the Dec. 8 commission meeting, no stakeholder groups support the proposed revisions.

    So I'm looking to you to lead the way for Oregon's wolves. Please ensure that the wolf plan prioritizes conservation and science over killing and special interests.

  • Resist Trump's Attacks on Our National Monuments
    Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

    President Trump has announced that he's slashing Bears Ears National Monument in Utah by 85 percent and Grand Staircase-Escalante by about half. It's the latest in a long line of attacks by Trump and members of Congress trying to dismantle our public lands system.

    Will you send a letter to your members of Congress urging them to stop these public lands assaults?

    Public lands play a vital role in providing clean water and air, habitat for wildlife, and places for people to recreate and find solace. These lands belong to all of us, and it's our job to protect them for future generations.

    This fight is far from over. But if we're going to win, we need everyone to stand up, raise their voices and demand that our national monuments and other public lands get the protections they deserve.

    Using the form on this page, please take a moment now to send a letter to your members of Congress.

  • Tempe: Join the Fight to Stop Trump's Border Wall
    Protester

    President Trump plans to wall off the entire U.S.-Mexico border — putting both wildlife and communities at risk of great harm. But the Center and allies are fighting that wall, and we need your help.

    Local leaders in the Tempe City Council may be considering a resolution at one of their upcoming meetings to formally oppose Trump's border wall. So now is the time to raise your voice and make it clear that the people of Tempe oppose Trump's destructive plans.

    Beyond jeopardizing wildlife and our protected public lands, the U.S.-Mexico border wall is part of a larger strategy of ongoing border militarization that damages human rights, civil liberties and native lands. The border wall impedes the natural migrations of people and wildlife that are essential to our planet's health and diversity.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to the Tempe City Council in support of a resolution opposing the border wall.

  • Flagstaff: Join the Fight to Stop Trump's Border Wall
    Protester

    President Trump plans to wall off the entire U.S.-Mexico border — putting both wildlife and communities at risk of great harm. But the Center and allies are fighting that wall, and we need your help.

    Local leaders in the Flagstaff City Council may be considering a resolution at one of their upcoming meetings to formally oppose Trump's border wall. So now is the time to raise your voice and make it clear that the people of Flagstaff oppose Trump's destructive plans.

    Beyond jeopardizing wildlife and our protected public lands, the U.S.-Mexico border wall is part of a larger strategy of ongoing border militarization that damages human rights, civil liberties and native lands. The border wall impedes the natural migrations of people and wildlife that are essential to our planet's health and diversity.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to the Flagstaff City Council in support of a resolution opposing the border wall.

  • Add Your Name: Join the Fight to Protect Elephants
    African elephant

    The Trump administration's war on wildlife just hit a disgusting new low. This time it puts elephants in the crosshairs. It's repulsive that these gentle, majestic creatures are still being hunted. Now the Trump administration wants to allow Americans to bring back their offensive "elephant trophies" after a kill.

    Rescinding the ban on importing elephant trophies is wrong and encourages a vile and damaging practice — the poaching of elephants for sport.

    Sign our pledge today to stand with us in the fight to protect elephants. We'll keep you in the loop on upcoming actions to defend these amazing animals.

  • Protect Sage Grouse From Fracking, Drilling and Mining
    Greater sage grouse

    The Bureau of Land Management is considering amendments to land-use plans for greater sage grouse habitat across 10 western states. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has made it clear he intends to gut these already weak plans to make it even easier for corporations to frack, drill, and mine in the birds' habitat on public lands.

    Greater sage grouse are completely dependent on intact sagebrush steppe for survival. Over the past 200 years, agriculture, oil and gas drilling, livestock grazing and development have reduced their range by nearly half, and their populations have steadily declined. Zinke's "drill first, ask later" agenda threatens to hasten the loss of sagebrush habitat and accelerate the bird's trajectory towards extinction.

    Using the form on this page, tell the BLM that greater sage grouse urgently need increased protections consistent with science, including an end to all new oil and gas drilling in their habitat.

    Want to have even more impact? Personalize this letter. Tell the BLM why the greater sage grouse matters to you.

  • Save the San Pedro River From Water Theft
    San Pedro River

    The San Pedro River in southeast Arizona is one of the most beautiful and important riparian areas in the United States. More than 250 migrant and wintering bird species depend on it, and beneath its cottonwoods desert life abounds.

    But a new sprawling development in Benson, Ariz., called the Villages at Vigneto could put the future of this river at risk. Tell the Army Corps of Engineers to deny the permit needed to continue this project.

    The Army Corps is reevaluating the Clean Water Act permit it issued in 2006 when the project was known as Whetstone Ranch. But since then the proposal has mushroomed. Developers want golf courses, artificial lakes and more than 29,000 homes — a Tuscany-themed playground wasting life-giving water in the desert.

    We can't let it happen. The groundwater pumping for this massive sprawl development will deplete the San Pedro and its tributaries and will steal federal reserved water rights that belong to our public lands. If the San Pedro dries up, it'll also hurt a wide range of imperiled wildlife, particularly songbirds. Jaguars and ocelots have been sighted in the area.

    Act now to save the San Pedro. Demand that the Army Corps revoke the 2006 permit and stop the theft of public San Pedro water.

  • Take the Pledge to Save the Endangered Species Act
    Monarch butterfly

    Trump and his cronies in Congress are an unprecedented threat to America's most vulnerable wildlife, from monarch butterflies to jaguars. Since January 2017 Congress has launched 47 legislative attacks against the Endangered Species Act. Polluters and profiteers are perfectly fine with pushing plants and animals to the brink of extinction just to make a buck.

    If we're going to save the Act and every species it protects, we need to take immediate action to fight the Trump administration's anti-wildlife agenda.

    Join the movement to save the Endangered Species Act by signing our pledge today. Together we'll take on Trump's administration through science, law, media and the collective voice of millions.

  • Take the Pledge to Fight Trump's Border Wall
    Border wall in Arizona

    Trump's border wall will devastate the environment, wildlife and people living in border communities. If we don't take action to stop it, more than 90 wildlife species across 2 million acres will be at risk.

    Critical habitats will be destroyed. Our cherished public lands, including Big Bend National Park, will be forever scarred. And endangered wildlife like jaguars, ocelots and Mexican gray wolves will be a step closer to extinction.

    Join the movement to fight Trump's border wall by signing our pledge today. Together we'll take on his destructive agenda through science, law, media and the collective voice of millions.

  • Stop Drilling Near Death Valley National Park
    Death Valley

    Trump's Bureau of Land Management is considering opening Conglomerate Mesa, protected land just west of Death Valley National Park, to drilling and mining.

    A corporation wants to begin exploratory drilling of low-grade gold ore as the first step toward opening a cyanide heap-leach mine. All of the drill sites are on public lands that are part of the National Landscape Conservation System and two drill sites are also in a designated Area of Critical Environmental Concern.

    The proposed drilling project would harm largely undisturbed public lands and rare plants, degrade the air quality of Death Valley and the Owens Valley, and destroy numerous cultural sites. And if an open-pit mine is built, it will be a blight on the sweeping views from Mount Whitney and other high elevations in the eastern Sierra Nevada.

    Using the form on this page, tell the BLM to reject the proposal to drill in Conglomerate Mesa.

  • Support Free-ranging Tule Elk at Point Reyes
    Tule elk at Point Reyes National Seashore

    Native tule elk were reintroduced to Point Reyes National Seashore in Marin County, Calif., in 1978. Since then their recovery has been an exciting success story. Point Reyes is the only national park with tule elk. But there's trouble for elk ahead, and we need your help.

    The National Park Service is updating its park planning and may kill and/or remove elk from Point Reyes at the request of ranchers who enjoy private cattle grazing leases in the park. The Park Service allowed half the park's original elk herd to die during the 2012-2014 drought by fencing them in, and it shot 26 elk in 2015 and 2016. Now it has plans to run elk off of 18,000 acres to allow cattle sole access to these public lands.

    The Park Service is also considering allowing conversion of grasslands and wildlife habitat at Point Reyes to artichoke farms and other row crops. The public would lose access to this land, and conversion would destroy wildlife habitat. Also on the table is allowing ranchers to raise sheep, goats, turkeys, chickens and pigs in the park, a disastrous plan that would lead to killing of the park's coyotes and bobcats.

    Using the form on this page, tell Park Service officials that 1) you object to the removal of any tule elk from their native land, 2) they shouldn't allow row crops or new commercial animal farming, and 3) any cattle ranching operations must be managed to accommodate elk and other native wildlife.

    You can also comment on what levels of cattle ranching are appropriate for Point Reyes National Seashore. Based on the Center's legal settlement with the Park Service, the agency must consider management alternatives that would remove all cattle ranching from the park, remove all dairy cattle operations, or reduce existing ranching operations.

    And if you can, please personalize your letter.

  • Urgent: Pledge to Protect Our National Monuments
    The Fight Is On.

    It's official. Trump is decimating two of America's most iconic and historically important national monuments: Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante. Protections for 2 million acres of public lands will be slashed — 85 percent of Bears Ears and half of Grand Staircase-Escalante.

    If we fail to take action to stop Trump and his cronies, this will only be the beginning: Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Oregon and California and Gold Butte National Monument in Nevada have already been identified for reductions.

    Sign our pledge today to help protect our national monuments. We'll make sure you know the critical updates and actions to save our public lands. Together we can take on Trump's administration through science, law, activism and the collective voice of millions like you.

  • Stop This Reckless Logging Bill
    Oregon logging

    Soon the House will vote on a bill allowing massive logging projects of up to 45 square miles each on public lands without any disclosure of potential harms to wildlife, forests and watersheds.

    The bill would also severely limit the public's ability to meaningfully engage in national forest management. Misleadingly named the "Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017," it's a blank check to special interests that will take us back to dark days of reckless logging.

    Using the form on this page, take action now to stop this this bill — urge your representative to vote no on H.R. 2936.

  • Stop Drilling and Fracking in the Ruby Mountains
    Ruby Mountains

    The Ruby Mountains of northeast Nevada are the crown jewels of Nevada's Great Basin. High, rugged, glaciated peaks rise above thick aspen groves and open sagebrush slopes. The largest herds of mule deer in Nevada call the Rubies home, as do elk, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and mountain goats.

    Some of the best trout fisheries, including those harboring threatened Lahontan cutthroat trout, are in the creeks cascading down from the Ruby Crest. And the Rubies provide abundant, high-priority habitat for vulnerable sage grouse. In short, this is a paradise for Nevada's wildlife.

    But this stunning landscape could be ruined if it is opened up for fracking and drilling. Will you speak up to save it?


    The U.S. Forest Service is considering leasing 54,000 acres in the Ruby Mountains for oil companies to exploit for fracking and drilling. This has the potential to poison the waters of the Ruby Mountains with a toxic cocktail of chemicals — a disaster for the trout fisheries. Widespread oil and gas development has been shown to dramatically decrease numbers of big game like deer. And sage grouse are highly susceptible to disturbance from oil drilling.

    Using the form on this page, please send this message to the Forest Service: The Ruby Mountains are too special for destructive fossil fuel extraction.

  • Protect Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor From Dangerous Pesticides
    Willapa Bay

    State officials are considering allowing oyster growers to spray imidacloprid, a dangerous neonicotinoid pesticide, over thousands of acres of coastline. Widely known for contributing to the decline of bees and other pollinators, neonicotinoids like imidacloprid can also devastate aquatic invertebrates and the animals that rely on them for food.

    And spraying at the water's edge would mean neonic pesticides applied to the oysters and clams we eat.

    Last year public outcry forced state officials to back away from a permit that would have allowed the use of pesticides to kill native sand shrimp that make it difficult to grow oysters. This year the permit is back on the table, even though the harms to our unique marine ecosystem are more apparent than ever.

    The state has the power to deny this permit, but it needs to hear from people who know a bad idea when they see it. Using the form on this page, take a moment now to speak up.

  • Stop Congress From Opening Arctic Refuge to Drilling
    Polar bears

    We need your help to stop Congress from trashing the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. This vast and beautiful wilderness in Alaska's northeast corner is absolutely no place for oil drilling. It's home to polar bears, musk oxen, massive herds of caribou and more than 200 kinds of migratory birds. The congressional budget resolution includes a veiled attempt to drill in the refuge, a goal of the Trump administration.

    Using the form on this page, urge your elected officials to oppose any budget bill that opens the Arctic refuge to oil drilling.

  • Help Save the Marbled Murrelet in Oregon
    Marbled murrelets

    The marbled murrelet, a rare seabird that nests in coastal old-growth forests, needs your help.

    The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission is considering increasing protection for the murrelet by changing its status from "threatened" to "endangered." These birds, which face threats from the logging industry and changing ocean conditions, badly need strengthened protections to escape extinction.

    Using the form on this page, write the commission about your support for uplisting marbled murrelets.

  • Time Is Running Out for Vaquitas — Can You Help?
    Vaquitas

    Fewer than 30 vaquitas are left in Mexico's northern Gulf of California. And experts have said that if the Mexican government doesn't quickly enact a permanent ban on the use of all gillnets, the vaquita will be extinct in less than two years.

    For decades this small porpoise has been killed in gillnets used to catch shrimp for sale in the United States. And more recently, vaquitas have died in gillnets used to illegally catch totoaba, an endangered fish whose swim bladder is prized in Asia.

    You can shift the tide for vaquitas. Using the form on this page, urge Amazon to join the growing list of retailers refusing to buy or sell Mexican shrimp until a real and permanent gillnet ban is implemented and enforced.

    In June Mexico announced a rule to rein in gillnet fishing in the vaquita's range. But it isn't enough. The plan exempts two fisheries from a full ban and fails to halt the possession, sale and manufacture of these nets in the region.
     
    There's still time to save vaquitas. Just last week Trader Joe's agreed to join the Mexican shrimp boycott. Tell Amazon to sign on too and help keep up the pressure.

  • Demand Congress Oppose Anti-wildlife Sportsmen's Bill
    Denning wolf pups

    Anti-wildlife politicians in Congress are eager to pass H.R. 3668, the deceptively named "Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act" or "SHARE Act." The bill contains giveaways to the NRA, including repealing regulations on silencers and armor-piercing bullets, as well as provisions that would harm wildlife, the environment and public safety.

    Even after the horrific events in Las Vegas, House Republicans have only temporarily "shelved" this bill. It could come back later this year or next when the Vegas shooting is out of the headlines.

    Using the form on this page, tell your representative that this bill should be permanently withdrawn and insist that they stand against any future attempts to pass any of its dangerous measures.

    The SHARE Act would prematurely strip protection from wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region and allow the slaughter of denning bears and wolves in Alaska national parks. It would promote polar bear trophy hunting. And it would eliminate the ability of the EPA and Interior Department to get toxic lead out of ammunition and fishing tackle.

    Let your representative know you won't stand for this abomination — and personalize your message for greater impact.

  • Reject Zombie Development in Riverside County
    Yellow-headed blackbird

    In 2012 the Center and allies successfully halted a mega-development right next to the 19,000-acre San Jacinto Wildlife Area. Unfortunately Riverside County has brought the "Villages of Lakeview" back from the dead and is poised to approve a nearly identical project in the same location.

    Using the form on this page, tell Riverside County to prioritize people and wildlife over developers and reject this disastrous project once and for all.

    The San Jacinto Wildlife Area is a critical piece of Riverside County's Habitat Conservation Plan and is home to dozens of imperiled plants and animals. The wildlife area also serves as an outdoor classroom for students and is used by hikers, hunters and bird watchers.  

    Riverside County has already scored an "F" from the American Lung Association for its dangerously unhealthy air quality. This project would make it even worse by placing residents far from jobs, public services and transportation.

    Urge the county to do the right thing and end plans for this zombie development.

  • No Time Like Now to Save Orcas
    Southern Resident killer whales

    The critically endangered Southern Resident killer whale population has just 76 individuals, making its extinction highly likely. In early 2015 the National Marine Fisheries Service rightly concluded that, to keep Southern Resident killer whales from forever disappearing, it was absolutely necessary to protect coastal areas off Washington, Oregon and Northern California as critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act.

    But then, in an about-face, the agency postponed a final rule protecting this habitat until 2018 or beyond, citing the need to gather more information. Scientific evidence, based on acoustic monitoring and satellite tracking, shows that the Southern Resident population uses these coastal areas for foraging during winter and spring.

    Meanwhile the threats continue all along the orcas' migration route, from Washington down to the San Francisco Bay: food supply depletion, fast-moving maritime traffic, coastal pollution, ocean noise and fishing gear entanglements could all be minimized by new rules.

    Using the form on this page, urge the Fisheries Service to move faster. Species with critical habitat protection are twice as likely to be on the path to recovery as those without.

  • Protect Colorado's Air From Fracking Pollution
    Fracking rig

    Denver's air quality is so bad it's unhealthy for children and the elderly to breathe. Each summer kids in Colorado suffer more than 30,000 asthma attacks linked to smog — and research has traced this smog to fracking pollution.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to Colorado's Air Quality Control Commission telling it to support new rules to strengthen statewide air pollution standards for oil and gas facilities.

    Fracking is a drilling process that blasts huge amounts of water mixed with sand and chemicals deep underground to break apart shale deposits and extract gas and oil from the rock's pores. The process is common in the oil and gas industry and has led to a boom in production.

    But the fracking process is one of the biggest contributors to ozone pollution. Americans who live near oil and gas drilling wells are exposed to fracking-related air pollution in the form of chemicals such as methane, benzene and formaldehyde. And state air pollution safeguards have not kept pace to limit these pollutants from the industry.

    No family should have to worry about the air they breathe. But without strong statewide standards, these problems will persist.

    Take action today to support clean air in Colorado. Urge state officials to enact strong air pollution standards for the fracking industry.

  • There's No Safe Drilling in the Arctic
    Bowhead whales

    The Trump administration is trying to push through a dangerous drilling project in the Arctic Ocean. We need to stop it.

    Icy, stormy waters make Arctic drilling inherently hazardous and spills impossible to clean up. And Hilcorp, the company launching this project, has a history of spills and safety violations. If this so-called "Liberty" project goes forward, oil spills could easily occur in the heart of polar bear and bowhead whale habitat.

    Using the form on this page, send a message to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management that this reckless project threatens the Arctic's amazing wildlife and will deepen the climate crisis.

    The Liberty project would be the first oil development in federal Arctic waters, involving building an artificial island from which to drill down into the oilfield. If a blowout occurs, the "worst case discharge" scenario envisions a spill of 193 million gallons of oil over 90 days. This would do irreparable harm to the Far North's bears and whales.

    What's worse, Hilcorp has a history of frequently sidestepping environmental and safety rules. Just last year it struggled for months to plug a natural gas leak from one of its underwater pipelines in Cook Inlet, Alaska.

    Please — urge the Trump administration to reverse its proposal and reject Hilcorp's plan. Send a letter today.

  • Kick Brain-damaging Pesticide Chlorpyrifos Out of California
    Apple on branch

    One of Scott Pruitt's first acts after Donald Trump made him head of the Environmental Protection Agency was to reverse the recommendation of the agency's own scientists to ban the use of the brain-damaging pesticide chlorpyrifos.

    Since our federal government won't stand up for us on this issue, we need state regulators to take a leadership role. Tell the California Department of Pesticide Regulation to immediately, decisively halt the use of chlorpyrifos in California.

    Science clearly shows that chlorpyrifos poses an unreasonable threat to California's most vulnerable populations. This is the same neurotoxic insecticide that was banned from home use in 2001, after research showed that prenatal and childhood exposure to this chemical can lead to devastating brain disorders, ADHD, loss of IQ and other harms.

    That's why it's unacceptable that each year more than 1 million pounds of this poison are dumped on crops from apples and bell peppers to cranberries and kale.

    Earlier this year the Center and allies generated more than 164,000 signatures to Gov. Brown calling for a ban on chlorpyrifos — thanks to all of you who took action. Let's keep up the pressure: Using the form on this page, tell California regulators to step in where our federal government has failed and end the use of this toxic pesticide in the state.

  • Why Is the EPA Trying to Kill Clean Car Standards?
    Los Angeles traffic

    More bad news from EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt: He has proposed to roll back clean car standards that reduce carbon pollution, save fuel and help us avoid the worst effects of climate change.

    The rest of the world is sprinting to deploy electric vehicles and cleaner cars and trucks. But if Pruitt has his way, the auto industry could go back to selling more gas-guzzling cars without pollution controls. We shouldn't allow them to rake in short-term profits at the expense of our health and the environment.  

    Take action today — using the form on this page, tell Pruitt to do his job and protect our environment from the dirty, dangerous vehicles that are making people sick and disrupting our climate.

  • Tell SLO City Council: Resist Trump's Plan to Drill and Frack Our Oceans
    Pismo Beach

    Donald Trump has promised corporations unrestricted access to oil and gas reserves lying under U.S. oceans. His plan to dramatically expand offshore drilling threatens all our oceans and coastlines with oil spills and toxic pollution. But California seaside communities are fighting back. Will you take action to protect the San Luis Obispo coastline?

    Urge San Luis Obispo City Council members to resist Trump by passing a resolution calling for an end to new offshore drilling and fracking off our coast.


    Up and down the California coast, communities are demanding that their city representatives pass local resolutions protecting them from expanded offshore oil and gas development. We recently secured the first resolution in Santa Barbara, and three more communities already have followed suit. Let's make SLO the next.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to your city council members today.

  • Tell the Goleta City Council: Resist Trump's Plan to Drill and Frack Our Oceans
    Coast at Goleta, Calif.

    Donald Trump has promised corporations unrestricted access to oil and gas reserves lying under U.S. oceans. His plan to dramatically expand offshore drilling threatens all our oceans and coastlines with oil spills and toxic pollution. But California seaside communities are fighting back. Will you take action to protect the Goleta coastline?

    Urge Goleta City Council members to resist Trump by passing a resolution calling for an end to new offshore drilling and fracking off our coast.


    Up and down the California coast, communities are demanding that their city representatives pass local resolutions protecting them from expanded offshore oil and gas development. We recently secured the first resolution in Santa Barbara, and three more communities already have followed suit. Let's make Goleta the next.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to your city council members today.

  • Protect Florida's Goliath Groupers
    Goliath grouper

    Goliath grouper were once abundant from Florida to Brazil, but overfishing and habitat loss decimated their numbers. Since 1990 harvest and possession of the fish have been prohibited in U.S. federal waters and state waters off Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. This ban has allowed goliath grouper to recover, but they still have a long way to go.

    And now the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is considering allowing harvest of these giant, rare fish again in state waters.

    Will you speak out in favor of upholding protections for goliath grouper?


    The commission's proposal would allow the lethal harvest of 100 goliath groupers per year for four years for research. But the science that the commission hopes to gather by harvesting fish can be accomplished using a nonlethal catch-and-release program. And claims from fishermen that goliath grouper are interfering with other fisheries have been disproven.

    The proposed harvest would target most of Florida's breeding population of goliath grouper. This would undermine 27 years of conservation efforts and put the population at risk of extinction.

    Using the form on this page, tell the commission you support keeping Florida's goliath grouper protected, and ask it to adopt nonlethal means of studying the fish.

  • Tell Congress: Save Alaska Wildlife From Brutal Killing
    Alaska bears

    Earlier this year, Trump signed legislation that allows cruel practices on national wildlife refuges in Alaska like shooting bears and wolves from airplanes, gunning down bears at bait stations, and killing wolves and pups in their dens.

    The Center is fighting for these animals in court. But meanwhile, Republicans have launched another assault on Alaskan wildlife — this time on those living on National Park Service lands. The House just passed an amendment allowing even more killing of Alaska predators at their most vulnerable.

    Using the form on this page, tell your senator that such brutality has no place on National Park Service lands.

  • San Diego: Reject Trump's Disastrous Border Wall
    Protester

    Your voice is needed to show support for the San Diego City Council Sept. 19 vote on a resolution to oppose Trump's border wall.

    Using the script below, call Mayor Kevin Faulconer at (619) 236-6330 and tell him you support the No Border Wall Resolution passed by City Council. Then let us know you called.

    Hi, my name is               and I live in              . I'm calling in support of the city's resolution to formally oppose Trump's border wall. This wall will harm wildlife and their habitat. And it'll damage human rights, civil liberties, native lands, and international relations with Mexico. Please move forward with this resolution knowing you have my full support. Thank you.

    Background

    Beyond jeopardizing wildlife and our protected public lands, the U.S.-Mexico border wall is part of a larger strategy of ongoing border militarization that damages human rights, civil liberties, native lands, and international relations with Mexico, a neighbor country that recently sent first responders to Hurricane Harvey. The border wall impedes the natural migrations of people and wildlife that are essential to our planet's health and diversity.

    The City of San Diego finds both Executive Order 13767 and H.R.1813 offensive and damaging symbols of fear and division that will increase tensions with Mexico, one of the United States' largest trading partners and a neighbor with which communities such as San Diego in the border region are inextricably linked.

  • End the Commercial Collection of Nevada's Reptiles
    Spiny lizard

    Did you know that Nevada currently allows the unrestricted collection of wild reptiles from public lands for personal profit?

    Fewer than 10 collectors are responsible for removing up to 15,000 lizards and snakes each year. And those reptiles are sold in foreign markets.

    Using the form on this page, tell the Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners to ban the collection of the state's wild reptiles. The board will decide on a potential ban at its next meeting in Las Vegas on Sept. 23.

    Who can imagine the desert without lizards and snakes? Reptiles are part of the foundation of our desert ecosystems. They're a cherished part of our identity, and Nevada has one of the highest levels of reptile diversity in the United States.

    Nevada's reptiles are in trouble, and they need your help. Act now to show your support.

  • Tell Gov. Cooper: N.C. Forests Aren't Fuel
    North Carolina forest

    The wood pellet industry has its eyes on North Carolina's forests, and we need your help safeguarding these precious areas for both people and wildlife.  

    Using the sample call script below, please call Gov. Roy Cooper today at (919) 814-2000 or (919) 814-2050 and urge him to revoke the permit for Enviva's destructive Richmond County plant. Then let us know you called.

    Hi, my name is _____, and I live in _____. I'm calling to urge Gov. Cooper to protect the forests and people of Richmond County by revoking Enviva's permit for a wood pellet mill. If constructed, this mill will clearcut nearly 50 acres of forests a day. It'll pollute our air. And it'll cut down the standing trees we need to combat climate change.

    I was also upset to hear that Enviva received its permit for this mill without having a public hearing, ignoring the community that will be harmed. And as you know, there is an active lawsuit challenging the permit. That's why I urge the governor to revoke Enviva's permit today and prove that he is a true climate champion. Thank you.

    Background

    Enviva is one of the biggest companies in the wood pellet industry, which is turning North Carolina forests into fuel for European power plants. The industry claims to be clean and green — but in reality it's dirty from forest to smokestack. Enviva has been caught clearcutting coastal forests that provide critical habitat to many rare and imperiled species.

    The new wood pellet mill would cover nearby communities with soot pollution. It'll also bring dust and noise from 200 truck deliveries per day. Once the pellets get to Europe, they'll be burned in huge power plants, giving off even more CO2 than the coal they're meant to replace.

    Fortunately there's still time for Gov. Cooper to act before Enviva breaks ground this fall. Tell the governor to revoke the past administration's permit and spare Richmond County, North Carolina's forests, and our climate from this disastrous project.

  • Stop the Use of Cyanide Land Mines That Kill Wildlife
    Coyote

    Days after a young male wolf died a brutal death in Oregon earlier this year, a "cyanide bomb" like the one that killed him claimed more victims. Canyon, a 14-year old boy out for a walk with the family's Labrador retriever, inadvertently triggered the deadly device, which blasted cyanide that blinded him and killed his beloved dog.

    Known as M-44s, these sweet-smelling capsules deliver a fatal dose of poison to the face or inside the mouth when activated by an animal drawn to the scent, causing immense suffering. M-44s are typically stuck in the ground out in the wild — where anything or anyone might find them, making them indiscriminate killers.

    USDA's Wildlife Services kills thousands of animals a year with these devices. A coyote is poisoned to death by an M-44 once every 40 minutes — that's more than 13,000 coyotes a year.

    With intentional and accidental deaths stacking up, the Center for Biological Diversity and other conservation groups have petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to outlaw their use.

    Using the form on this page, tell the EPA to protect pets, people and wildlife by immediately banning the use of M-44 cyanide traps nationwide.

  • Massachusetts: Help Save Elephants and Rhinos
    Elephant

    Did you know that in 2015 Massachusetts was the fourth-largest ivory market in the United States? That's right. The elephant and rhino poaching crisis isn't just happening in Africa, but in your home state. Here's your chance to change that.

    Using the form on this page, tell your state legislators to support two new bills, S.450 and H.419, that will ban ivory and rhino horn trade in Massachusetts.

    With one elephant dying every 15 minutes and with rhinos also disappearing, we must act fast. A new federal law restricts elephant ivory sales, but Massachusetts law still has gaping loopholes that allow the selling and trading of ivory and rhino horn. It's hard to imagine, but just two years ago Boston was ranked 4th in the United States for sales of ivory advertised on Craigslist. This new bill would remove those loopholes by banning the import, in-state and internet sale and distribution of ivory and rhino horns in Massachusetts.

    Take action today: Tell your state legislators to help save elephants and rhinos, and support these important bills.

  • Tell Your Senators to Oppose the Dairy Pride Act
    Dairy cows

    In the United States, dairy production has a devastating impact on our land, water and air — producing more emissions each year than 9 million cars.

    That's why we must stand up now in defense of Earth-friendly diets. Just as more people are turning to plant-based alternatives like soy, almond and coconut milks, the dairy industry and its allies in Congress are trying to stamp out the competition.

    The recently proposed Dairy Pride Act (S.130) would prevent plant-based alternatives from using basic terms such as "milk," "yogurt" and "cheese." The bill would also force the Food and Drug Administration to penalize any company using these terms. If the legislation passes, it'll put plant-based dairy alternatives at a disadvantage in stores.

    Using the form on this page, tell your senators to oppose the Dairy Pride Act.

  • Speak Up for San Bernardino's National Monuments
    Sand to Snow National Monument

    The Trump administration is targeting the newly established national monuments in San Bernardino County through a "review" that's really a plan to shrink or eliminate these protected lands. Local officials need to take defensive action, and we need your help.

    Send a letter to the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors asking it to adopt a resolution to support the current boundaries of the monuments.

    San Bernardino's three national monuments are irreplaceable and uniquely California.

    Sand to Snow contains the headwaters of two Southern California rivers: the Santa Ana and the Whitewater. This monument is home to a wildly diverse collection of native plants, insects and fish that are only found in our state. A number of these are also protected as endangered species.

    Mojave Trails preserves striking desert lands in the heart of the Mojave. The monument links Joshua Tree National Park, the Mojave National Preserve and 13 wilderness areas into a matrix of conserved public lands.

    Castle Mountains conserves the missing piece of the Mojave National Preserve and is home to Joshua tree forests and unique desert grasslands.

    Don't let the Trump administration take away our national monuments. Using the form on this page, tell the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors to adopt a resolution to support the current boundaries of our monuments.

  • North Carolina: Tell Gov. Cooper to Reject the Atlantic Coast Pipeline
    Carolina madtom

    There's still time to help stop the Atlantic Coast Pipeline before it's too late. With the pipeline slated for federal approval, Gov. Cooper is the last line of defense for North Carolina. We must urge him to deny the necessary water permits to the dirty fossil fuel companies behind this disastrous 519-mile project. The pipeline would cross more than 560 streams and wetlands in eastern North Carolina and harm 30 threatened species, including the Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog.

    Take action now: Using the form on this page, write Gov. Cooper and urge him to reject the water permit that Duke Energy and Dominion Energy need before they can plow a 100-foot-wide scar down the eastern seaboard.

    The pipeline would require nearly 600 acres of forested wetlands in North Carolina to be cleared for construction, which will entail blasting, drilling and trenching. It would burrow beneath six major rivers, putting the drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people at risk. Habitats will be divided and destroyed, wildlife will be displaced, and our watersheds will be polluted.

    Speak out against this project. Tell Gov. Cooper to stand up for North Carolinians and exercise his full power to protect our water and wildlife.

  • Say No to North Florida Phosphate Mine
    Florida phosphate mine

    Phosphate mining in Florida is a brutal process that destroys landscapes, alters watersheds and leaves behind mountains of radioactive waste. It puts people, wildlife and our Floridan aquifer at risk.

    That's why we need your help now to stop a proposal to dig yet another mine on 10,775 acres across Union and Bradford counties. Using the form on this page, send a letter to the Bradford Co. commissioners telling them you stand against destructive phosphate mines.

    More than 300,000 acres of Florida have already been destroyed by phosphate mining. This mine would irreversibly alter the Santa Fe River Basin, destroy precious wildlife habitat and threaten the health of people in the area.

    Don't let phosphate mining ruin more Florida landscapes. Take action today.

  • Keep New York's Terrapins Out of Traps
    Diamondback terrapin

    Diamondback terrapins are the wild jewels of eastern coastlines, known for their beautifully patterned shells. They also play a key ecological role by eating snails that devastate salt-marsh grasses and leave behind barren mudflats. Sadly countless terrapins are unintentionally drowned in crab traps each year when they're lured in by the bait and can't escape. 

    But there's hope for these rare turtles — and you can help. Using the form on this page, tell the state of New York to save terrapins from drowning by requiring terrapin excluder devices (TEDs).

    TEDs are small, inexpensive gadgets that can be attached to crab traps to save terrapins from unnecessary harm. New York has proposed a new rule to require TEDs on all crab traps in terrapin habitat. This new rule is good for conservationists and crabbers alike, preventing the senseless loss of terrapins while insignificantly affecting crab hauls.

    Tell New York officials you support these common-sense protections for the state's treasured terrapins.

  • Get This Dangerous Pesticide Banned for Good
    Broccoli crops

    Over 5 million pounds of a pesticide named chlorpyrifos are used on crops in the United States each year. Originally derived from a Nazi nerve gas, chlorpyrifos is so harmful that children of mothers exposed during pregnancy are three times as likely to develop autism and face potential IQ loss by age 7.

    Despite the well-documented harm caused by this pesticide, Trump's EPA has decided to reverse a proposed ban of chlorpyrifos for use on food — because Dow Chemical, maker of chlorpyrifos and a major donor to the Trump inauguration, asked for a favor.

    Can you help us get chlorpyrifos banned for good?


    Senator Udall of New Mexico has introduced a bill in the Senate that would finally ban all uses of chlorpyrifos. Using the form on this page, tell your senators to support Sen. Udall's Protect Children, Farmers and Farmworkers from Nerve Agent Pesticides Act of 2017.

  • Say No to Traps on Public Lands
    Red fox

    Cruel and dangerous traps have no place on lands set aside for conservation and recreation — like the millions of acres within national forests and wildlife refuges. But right now government and commercial trappers are allowed to place inhumane traps throughout our public lands, putting both wild and domesticated animals at risk.

    Help remove traps from our federal lands. Urge your representative to cosponsor the Limiting Inhumane Federal Trapping (LIFT) Act.

    Government trappers target animals like wolves, coyotes, bears and mountain lions even though research has shown that eradicating these key predator species — and hurting ecosystems in the process — doesn't even protect livestock. Commercial trappers also use our federal lands to kill foxes, beavers and other animals for their fur. And traps don't discriminate between victims: If hidden along popular trails or waterways, they can capture and kill pets, too.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to your representative. Tell them to cosponsor the LIFT Act (H.R. 1727), which would help stop this unnecessary killing and promote broader use of nonlethal predator-control methods.

  • Pollinators Are in Peril, But You Can Help
    Honeybee

    Pollinators like bees are responsible for 1 out of every 3 bites of the food you eat. But widespread use of neonicotinoid pesticides is threatening them nationwide.

    Can you take action to protect them?

    Representative Blumenauer (D-Ore.) has introduced the Saving America's Pollinators Act, which would require the EPA to temporarily suspend the sale of neonics, prohibit new approvals of this dangerous class of pesticides, and monitor the health and population status of native bees.

    Neonics are used to coat seeds planted on more than 150 million acres in the United States and directly sprayed onto pretreated plants sold at garden retailers. Thousands of studies show they're highly toxic to pollinators.

    Using the form on this page, urge your representative to support the Saving America's Pollinators Act and ask your senator to introduce a companion bill in the Senate.

  • Stop the Dirty-Energy Bill
    Smokestacks

    Soon the Senate will vote on the Energy and Natural Resources Act of 2017. Introduced by Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), S. 1460 would advance the Trump administration's dirty-energy agenda. A gift to the fossil fuel industry, the bill would lock us into additional decades of reliance on dirty energy.

    We need to stop it in its tracks.

    The bill promotes dangerous fracking by fast-tracking approvals for fracked-gas export terminals and gas pipelines. It pours hundreds of millions of dollars into failed "carbon capture and storage" technology for coal. Every major provision in the bill, as summarized in our fact sheet, will worsen climate change and the health of the American people.

    At a time when our transition away from fossil fuels should be in high gear, this bill robs our children of a clean energy future.

    Using the form on this page, tell your senators you don't want our energy policy dictated by Trump and dirty, climate-wrecking fossil fuel companies.

  • Protect San Francisco Bay From More Oil Spills
    Oil-spill warning sign

    Last year we battled Phillips 66 to stop it from routing hundreds of additional oil trains to its Southern California refinery. We won that fight -- and now it's time for round two.

    Phillips 66 has requested an increase to the maximum amount of crude oil and gas that can be transported to its marine terminal in Rodeo, Calif., right on the shores of the San Francisco Bay.

    We can't let this happen.


    More crude coming through the Bay Area would mean more spills. Just last year Phillips 66 spilled an unknown amount of crude near the Rodeo refinery, leaving a 40-yard-wide, mile-long oil sheen on the bay. The spill sent more than 100 residents of nearby Vallejo to the hospital and prompted more than 1,400 odor complaints. Disturbingly, the cause of the spill is still unknown.

    If Phillips 66's request is granted, much of the additional crude coming to the Rodeo terminal will be Alberta tar sands oil, which requires great effort to extract and refine. In the era of climate change, we can't afford the extremely high carbon costs of this form of fuel.

    Using the form on this page, tell state regulators that you expect them to undertake a comprehensive review of the risks posed by Phillip 66's proposal to bring more tar sands tankers into the Bay Area.

  • Tell Zinke: Drilling Has No Place in Our Oceans
    Oil spill and fire in the Gulf of Mexico

    The Trump administration just asked the oil industry its fantasy question: If you could drill anywhere offshore, where would it be?

    Trump had already promised companies unrestricted access to oil and gas reserves under America's oceans, so this "request for information," as it's called, isn't a surprise -- but it is an emergency. It launches the creation of a new federal offshore leasing plan that could open all U.S. waters to dangerous drilling, rolling back protections established under the Obama administration for the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans.

    Trump's plan to aggressively expand offshore drilling threatens every ocean and coastline in the United States with oil spills, pipelines, more offshore oil platforms, and a worsened climate crisis. But if enough of us stand up and speak out, we can beat back the administration's reckless attack on marine wildlife, coastal communities and the planet.

    Using the form on this page, please take a moment right now to tell the feds which oceans we want opened to drilling: none.

  • Tell the EPA to Ban Bee-killing Pesticides
    Honeybee

    Did you know that pollinators including bees are responsible for 1 out of every 3 bites of food we eat? We owe a lot to our pollinator friends -- and now they urgently need our help.

    The widespread use of a dangerous class of pesticides called neonicotinoids, or neonics, is threatening pollinators nationwide. Thousands of studies show that these pesticides -- which are applied to crop seeds planted on over 100 million acres in the United States and sold on pretreated plants at garden retailers -- are highly toxic to bees and many other species.

    The EPA has acknowledged that commonly used neonicotinoid pesticides pose significant risks to bees, but the agency refuses to stand up to bullying pesticide companies and take meaningful action to rein in neonic use.

    That's why we're calling on you to create some buzz for the bees. Using the form on this page, tell the EPA to ban bee-killing neonics.

  • Act Now — Save California's Desert Water
    Mojave Trails National Monument

    A bill now pending in the state legislature could save the beautiful Mojave Desert from the massive, destructive water grab that is the Cadiz water project. It would require a full review of the project by the State Lands Commission and California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

    Using the form on this page, tell your state reps, the Los Angeles City Council and mayor, and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California's Board to support Assembly Bill 1000 (Friedman) now.

    To feed sprawl development, the Cadiz project would pump about 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year from the ancient aquifer that lies beneath the new Mojave Trails National Monument. The survival of desert bighorn sheep, the adjacent Mojave National Preserve and the cultural landscape of native desert peoples depend on this water — such pumping would devastate life-giving springs and seeps already threatened by climate change.

    The Trump administration has put this boondoggle on a list of high-priority infrastructure projects. Tell your state reps, the Los Angeles City Council and mayor, and the Metropolitan Board how crucial it is that they support this bill.

  • Stop Sweetheart Land Deal for PolyMet Mining
    Moose

    PolyMet Mining Company wants 6,650 acres of Superior National Forest land in northeastern Minnesota so it can build the state's first open-pit copper mine -- a move that would spell disaster for the area's wetlands and wildlife, from moose to wolves to Canada lynx.

    Please -- join our fight to make sure this doesn't happen.

    U.S. House Rep. Rick Nolan has introduced a bill that would force the approval of a land exchange based on an appraisal that values these public lands at just $550 per acre.  

    The PolyMet mine would destroy 1,000 acres of high-quality wetlands and more than 1,700 acres of critical wildlife habitat in northern Minnesota's Superior National Forest. It would also pose the risk of long-term toxic water pollution in the Lake Superior watershed upstream from the St. Louis River, the Fond du Lac Reservation and the city of Duluth.

    The Center and our allies have active litigation challenging the land exchange to ensure adequate protection for wolves and lynx and to protect the public's interest in these national forest lands. Rep. Nolan seeks an end run around this litigation to force approval of this controversial land exchange.

    Using the form on this page, please tell Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken, and Reps. Tim Walz, Betty McCollum and Keith Ellison, to do the right thing and oppose H.R. 3115.

  • Don't Let Trump Turn This Forest Into a Coal Mine
    Canada lynx

    Trump's bringing his war on the climate to national forests in Colorado. He wants to expand coal mining into the stunning Sunset Roadless Area in the West Elk mountains -- some of the state's most pristine backcountry.

    We have to stop him.

    The roadless area -- a rolling landscape of aspen and spruce-fir forests -- is a treasured recreational resource. It's also home to animals like beavers, black bears, mountain lions, goshawks and imperiled Canada lynx. And scientific studies show that to avoid the worst effects of climate change, we must keep all remaining fossil fuels in the ground -- but 17 million tons of coal would be mined from this roadless area.

    Using the form on this page, tell the Forest Service you don't want the Sunset Roadless Area bulldozed for dirty, climate-wrecking coal.

  • Save Idaho's Wolves From Cruel Baiting
    Wolf

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is at it again, proposing ever-new and creative ways to eradicate wolves from every corner of the state. This time the agency has issued a new proposal to allow trophy hunters to bait the animals. If passed the proposal would make Idaho the only state to allow this vile practice.

    Using the form on this page, take a minute right now to remind state wildlife officials that wolf-baiting is cruel, cowardly and unethical -- and certainly fails to constitute "fair chase" hunting. You can help wolves most by personalizing the letter with your own words.

  • Help Mexican Wolves Survive Trump
    Mexican gray wolf

    The Trump administration has released a long-awaited draft recovery plan for Mexican gray wolves -- and it's deeply flawed.

    Against the recommendations made by independent scientists in 2012, the plan would suppress these rare wolves' numbers and distribution, hand over key management decisions to anti-wolf state game departments, and prematurely strip protections once numbers in the wild reach just 320 in the United States and 170 in Mexico, with no connections between populations.   

    Using the form on this page, please add your voice to the call for substantial revisions to this disastrous draft.

    Around 150 Mexican gray wolves now live in the wild in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico, along with another 250 in captivity. In the U.S. wild, the wolves suffer from inbreeding. That's why scientists have repeatedly urged new releases of captive wolves to boost genetic diversity -- and why Trump's plan will lead only to extinction. The plan would allow Arizona and New Mexico game officials to veto new releases and limit recovery to south of Interstate 40, although much of the best wolf habitat lies north of this arbitrary line.

    Join us today in opposing this sham recovery plan -- to be enforced with traps, neck-snares and bullets -- and insist on a rewrite based on science.

  • Don't Let Big Oil Set California's Climate Policy
    Smokestack

    All eyes are on California to lead the Trump resistance with real climate action. Yet incredibly, in order to pass a bill getting some policies he wants -- including an extension of the state's greenhouse gas cap-and-trade program through 2030 -- Gov. Jerry Brown has cut a backroom deal with Big Oil, handing the industry its wish list of special favors and exemptions from California law.

    Using the form on this page, please call your elected officials right now and urge them to vote no on Assembly Bill 398.

    This new bill would make cap-and-trade the only way that the state's Air Resources Board can address climate pollution from oil and gas refineries and production facilities. The bill would give Big Oil and other polluters within the cap-and-trade system a free pass from other crucial rules that protect our health and climate.

    Tying the hands of our state's most successful pollution regulators means less progress in fighting climate disruption, dirtier air for communities already suffering an unfair burden, and vastly reduced public participation in the rule-setting process.   

    Some argue that air-quality benefits supposedly provided by a companion bill, A.B. 617, justify the rollbacks. But any such benefits are uncertain and don't justify this deal. Please call your legislators now and urge them to vote no on A.B. 398.

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ and I'm from ____.  I'm calling to ask that you please vote no on Assembly Bill 398. This bill is a bad deal and sets a horrible precedent. It favors the oil industry over California's air and climate. And crucially, it would block state and local air boards from continuing to set powerful rules to reduce greenhouse pollution as they've done for so many other air pollutants.

    It makes no sense to tie the hands of our state and local regulators. Blocking important rules like the proposed cap on greenhouse gas emissions for Bay Area refineries would make it harder to reduce pollution from those refineries. It would also heap even dirtier air on communities already suffering an unfair burden, and it would prevent Californians like me from having a say in the rule-setting process.

    We need a deal that works for all Californians -- not one that gives special favors to the oil industry. Please vote no on A.B. 398.

  • Wolves Under Congressional Attack -- Take Action
    Jaguar

    Wolves and the Endangered Species Act are once again under serious assault. In the next two weeks Congress will be considering no fewer than three separate bills to remove federal protection from wolves in the western Great Lakes states. If any of these bills become law, thousands of wolves will be cruelly killed by hunters and trappers. These cynical bills would not only harm wolves, but would weaken and undermine the Endangered Species Act itself, which is under attack as never before.

    Congress will be considering the following bills:

    S.154: Former environmental champion Senator Ben Cardin (D-Md.) has joined forces with anti-wildlife Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) in sponsoring the cynically named "HELP for Wildlife Act," which would strip federal protection from Great Lakes wolves and block judicial review.  

    H.R. 242: The "Gray Wolf State Management Act of 2017" would also remove federal protection from Great Lakes wolves.

    2018 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill: This budget bill, which funds many government agencies, including the Environmental Protection Agency and Fish and Wildlife Service, has contained anti-wolf riders three years in a row. Fiscal year 2018's budget bill contains two anti-wolf provisions: one which would block funding for protections, including recovery, for all wolves across all lower 48 states, and one which would strip protections from wolves in the Great Lakes region.

    Using the form on this page, please call your members in Congress and demand that they protect wolves and defend the Endangered Species Act.  

    Here's a sample call script. If you get a voicemail, please leave a message.

    Hi, my name is ____, and I'm calling from [City, State]. I'm appalled by the three bills that are currently being considered by Congress to strip federal protection from wolves. These continuous attacks on our country's endangered wolves are shameful, cruel and unacceptable. I insist that you oppose any legislation that attacks the Endangered Species Act and the wildlife that it protects. Thank you.

  • Don't Let Maryland Sen. Cardin Sell Out Wolves
    Jaguar

    Maryland Senator Ben Cardin has just joined forces with anti-wildlife Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) to introduce legislation that would strip protection from endangered gray wolves in the Great Lakes region. This is political trading at its absolute worst: Sen. Cardin supports this new "sportsmen's bill" because it would also reauthorize the cleanup of the Chesapeake Bay. However, this reauthorization is merely symbolic -- Congress provides funding for the cleanup of the Chesapeake every year, regardless of whether the program is authorized or not.

    If this bill becomes law, the gruesome slaughter of wolves would resume -- between 2011 and 2014 nearly 1,500 wolves were killed in the Great Lakes before a federal judge restored protection under the Endangered Species Act.

    Shamelessly and undemocratically, this bill would end federal protection and eliminate any judicial review of the decision. It would also permanently block the EPA from protecting our waters and wildlife from lead pollution caused by discarded fishing gear.

    Please call Sen. Cardin right now at (202) 224-4524 and demand that he pull his sponsorship of the cynically named "HELP for Wildlife Act."


    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ and I live in [City, State]. I'm calling to demand that Sen. Cardin rescind his sponsorship of the "HELP for Wildlife Act" (S. 1514). Legislation that allows thousands of wolves to be hunted, trapped and slaughtered does not help wildlife. And legislation that causes more lead pollution in our lakes and rivers doesn't help either.

    In fact, not a single animal or plant will be helped by this horrendous bill. There is no excuse for Sen. Cardin to have accepted such a lopsided political deal at the expense of our natural heritage, clean water and air. He should not have traded the integrity of the Endangered Species Act for a symbolic reauthorization of Chesapeake Bay cleanup. I demand that he pull his sponsorship of this shameful bill until all anti-environment language is removed.

  • Don't Let Wisconsin Sen. Baldwin Sell Out Wolves
    Jaguar

    Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin has just joined forces with anti-wildlife Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) to introduce legislation that would strip protection from endangered gray wolves in the Great Lakes region. If this new "sportsmen's bill" becomes law, the gruesome slaughter of wolves would resume -- between 2011 and 2014 nearly 1,500 wolves were killed in the Great Lakes before a federal judge restored protection under the Endangered Species Act.

    Shamelessly and undemocratically, this bill would end federal protection and eliminate any judicial review of the decision. It would also permanently block the EPA from protecting our waters and wildlife from lead pollution caused by discarded fishing gear. 

    Please call Sen. Baldwin right now at (202) 224-5653 and demand that she pull her sponsorship of the cynically named "HELP for Wildlife Act."

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ and I live in [City, State]. I'm calling to demand that Sen. Baldwin rescind her sponsorship of the "HELP for Wildlife Act" (S. 1514). Legislation that allows thousands of wolves to be hunted, trapped and slaughtered does not help wildlife. And legislation that causes more lead pollution in our lakes and rivers doesn't help either.

    This deeply cynical bill only benefits the most extreme, anti-wildlife agendas. I demand that Sen. Baldwin pull her sponsorship of this shameful bill and instead protect the Endangered Species Act, which has been relentlessly attacked in recent years. At a time when the Trump administration is seeking to dismantle environmental protections across the board, it's extremely irresponsible for Sen. Baldwin to be introducing such harmful legislation.

  • Don't Let Minnesota Sen. Klobuchar Sell Out Wolves
    Jaguar

    Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar has just joined forces with anti-wildlife Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) to introduce legislation that would strip protection from endangered gray wolves in the Great Lakes region. If this new "sportsmen's bill" becomes law, the gruesome slaughter of wolves would resume -- between 2011 and 2014 nearly 1,500 wolves were killed in the Great Lakes before a federal judge restored protection under the Endangered Species Act.

    Shamelessly and undemocratically, this bill would end federal protection and eliminate any judicial review of the decision. It would also permanently block the EPA from protecting our waters and wildlife from lead pollution caused by discarded fishing gear. 

    Please call Sen. Klobuchar right now at (202) 224-3244 and demand that she pull her sponsorship of the cynically named "HELP for Wildlife Act."

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ and I live in [City, State]. I'm calling to demand that Sen. Klobuchar rescind her sponsorship of the "HELP for Wildlife Act" (S. 1514). Legislation that allows thousands of wolves to be hunted, trapped and slaughtered does not help wildlife. And legislation that causes more lead pollution in our lakes and rivers doesn't help either.

    This deeply cynical bill only benefits the most extreme, anti-wildlife agendas. I demand that Sen. Klobuchar pull her sponsorship of this shameful bill and instead protect the Endangered Species Act, which has been relentlessly attacked in recent years. At a time when the Trump administration is seeking to dismantle environmental protections across the board, it's extremely irresponsible for Sen. Klobuchar to be introducing such harmful legislation.

  • Say No to Sprawl Nightmare in L.A. County
    Swainson's hawk

    The Tejon Ranch Company, already notorious for its war against endangered California condors, now wants to build a city in rural Antelope Valley, northwestern Los Angeles County. The giant "Centennial" development -- more than 19,300 houses and 10 million square feet of industry and commerce -- would be plopped down on top of California's very last, best native grassland.

    In an era of climate change and shrinking natural resources, a massive, sprawling exurb is the last thing we need.

    At least 42 protected wildlife species call this place home and would be hurt by the sprawl, including condors, western yellow-billed cuckoos and Swainson's hawks.

    The development is far from jobs and public transit, so it will lead to ugly traffic jams on Interstate 5 and increase carbon pollution in an area that already suffers poor air quality. These new burdens will put California's climate change goals further out of reach.

    The Centennial project is way out of step with current successful development markets, which focus on transit-friendly, walkable cities near jobs.

    Using the form on this page, tell L.A. County's Department of Regional Planning to reject this disastrous project to protect our precious grasslands, air quality, wildlife and climate.

  • Not One More Inch: End Phosphate Mining in Manatee County
    Florida phosphate mine

    More than 300,000 acres in Florida have been destroyed by harmful phosphate mining, with less than half that area reclaimed -- but now the Mosaic Company wants to take another 3,500 acres from Manatee County.

    Phosphate mining destroys landscapes, communities and wildlife habitat, leaving the land scarred and contaminated. It involves ripping up the earth to dig down 60 to 80 feet and transporting the dug-out material by pipeline to a plant, where phosphate ore is extracted in a process that leaves behind massive clay "slime" ponds that cover 40 percent of the mined-out land.

    Once extracted, the ore is treated with sulfuric acid to produce fertilizer. This process creates the radioactive waste product phosphogypsum, which is stored in mountainous stacks. More than 1 billion tons of phosphogypsum are already piled up atop the Floridan aquifer. These stacks are prone to sinkholes and threaten the drinking water of nearly 10 million Floridians. The expansion of phosphate mining in Manatee County would threaten freshwater resources in the Myakka and Peace River watersheds, which have already suffered from phosphate mining.

    Using the form on this page, tell the Army Corps you don't want it to give up one more inch of Florida's precious environment to the phosphate-mining industry.

  • Save the EPA's 'Energy Star' Program
    Energy Star

    An enormous amount of energy is wasted in the United States every day -- with nearly 60 percent of energy sourced for electricity lost before it reaches homes, and even more wasted through leaks, inefficiencies and mismanagement. All that lost energy adds up and is dangerously contributing to the climate crisis.

    That's why we must defend energy efficiency programs like the EPA's Energy Star that help save energy and money. Right now Trump wants to slash these federal programs from the 2018 budget, despite their success and popularity.

    Energy Star has reduced greenhouse gas emissions by more than 2.7 billion metric tons over the past 25 years by providing tools and information to help people choose between different types of appliances, electronics, lighting and other products to make their houses and other buildings more efficient.

    With your help we'll keep it that way -- and the United States will curb its waste, reduce its energy needs, and transition to a just, clean, wildlife-friendly energy system.

    Using the form on this page, tell your representative in Congress to keep these programs fully funded to reduce energy waste.

  • California: Help Ban This Brain-damaging Pesticide
    Farm workers

    Ignoring decades of independent study and clear links to human health risks, especially for farmworkers and kids, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt recently decided to keep the brain-harming pesticide chlorpyrifos on the market for use on our nation's food crops.

    This is the same neurotoxic insecticide that was banned for home use in 2001 -- and for good reason. Childhood and prenatal exposure to this chemical can lead to devastating brain disorders, loss of IQ, ADHD, and other harms.

    That's why it's simply unacceptable that each year more than 1 million pounds of this pesticide are still being dumped on crops across the country, from apples and bell peppers to cranberries and kale. We need our local leaders, and specifically California Gov. Jerry Brown, to step in now where our federal government has failed and end use of this toxic pesticide.

    There are two things you can do to help:

    1) Using the form on this page, sign our petition to Gov. Brown urging him to protect our children and farmworkers by immediately banning chlorpyrifos.

    2) Attend a day of action in Sacramento on July 12 hosted by Californians for Pesticide Reform. Activists will meet that day at 11 a.m. outside California EPA headquarters for a rally and petition delivery, followed by a march and chance to speak with legislators. Free lunch and bus transport from several cities will be provided. Learn more and register by July 5. If you have questions, email Pesticide Action Network's Sarah Knight.

  • Stop Federal Funding of Abstinence Education
    Classroom

    Study after study shows that abstinence education is ineffective in preventing teen pregnancies. Yet in the 2016 fiscal year, the Department of Health & Human Services awarded over $70 million to fund abstinence education. By comparison, only $40.8 million was awarded to states to increase education and access to contraception.

    If we really want to prevent these pregnancies, we need to focus on interventions that work — contraception including condoms, oral birth control and long-acting reversible contraceptive devices like IUDs.

    Using the form on this page, demand that the Department of Health & Human Services stop funding abstinence-only-until-marriage programs.

  • Defend Our Wildlife From the Search for Atlantic Oil
    Humpback whale

    From Maine to Florida, people along the East Coast strongly oppose offshore oil and gas drilling in the Atlantic Ocean -- yet the Trump administration has just given draft authorization to five companies to use seismic airgun blasts to map fossil fuel deposits there. This despite the literally millions of instances of harm it would do to a wide range of whales, dolphins and other marine mammals.

    Please -- add your voice to that of 125 East Coast cities and towns that have passed resolutions in opposition and help us stop this destructive plan.

    Bombarding the ocean with 250-decibel blasts every 10 seconds, all day long and for months on end in hopes of finding oil, is reckless and cruel. Nine of the 450 remaining endangered North Atlantic right whales could be injured or killed, federal studies show. And East Coast residents rightly worry about the devastating impact an oil spill would have on tourism, fishing and recreation -- not to mention the added threat expanded drilling would pose for our climate.

    Using the form on this page, urge the National Marine Fisheries Service to reject the permits industry needs to hurt wildlife and begin seismic blasting in the Atlantic.

  • Save the Dixie Valley Toad
    Dixie Valley toad

    In a parched desert valley in central Nevada, thermal springs bubble to the surface, creating verdant wetlands with the most unlikely of residents: toads. The Dixie Valley toad is one of the rarest and most vulnerable toads in the world -- and it's facing extinction.

    The little toad has large, prominent eyes and an olive-colored body dotted with black freckles and rust-colored warts bordered by black halos. Like many of Nevada's groundwater-dependent species, it relies on consistent spring flow for survival.

    The toad's habitat is restricted to fewer than 1,500 acres in Churchill County. Unfortunately, a geothermal energy project has been proposed that could completely destroy this habitat through the construction of facilities and associated infrastructure like power lines, as well as by limiting the flow of groundwater to the surface.

    We strongly support renewable energy technologies such as geothermal and encourage their development in appropriate locations. However it is clear that this project is sited poorly and could deal a fatal blow to the Dixie Valley toad.

    Using the form on this page, speak up for Dixie Valley toads by telling the Bureau of Land Management to reject the proposed energy project.

  • Help Prevent More Gas Leaks at Aliso Canyon
    Aliso Canyon natural gas facility

    In 2015 the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility in Los Angeles blew out, spewing more than 100,000 tons of methane and displacing 25,000 neighbors for several months. Measured in terms of its environmental impact, it was the worst single natural gas leak in U.S. history.

    The facility is currently closed -- and it should stay closed until a study on the cause of the leak is completed. Last month the California state Senate considered a bill to do just that, but it fell short of passage by just three votes. The good news is that this bill has been granted reconsideration and will be voted on again.

    We've identified your state senator as one who can cast a vote to pass the bill. Using the form on this page, take a moment to urge him or her to protect California's people, air and climate by voting yes on S.B. 57.

    And if you can, please also call your senator at the number displayed on this page with the same message, using our letter for talking points.

  • Protect Alaska's Bristol Bay From Pebble Mine
    Alaskan sockeye salmon

    President Trump and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt recently announced their decision to remove protections that environmentalists and fishermen have long sought for some of our nation's most precious waters in Bristol Bay, Alaska. This would allow for the construction of Pebble Mine, an open-pit copper-and-gold mine which would have a disastrous and permanent impact on this prized salmon region. The announcement to even consider such a mine marks a sharp reversal to previous plans to protect the area.

    The Bristol Bay watershed is home to a pristine ecosystem and the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world. It supports 14,000 jobs in commercial fishing and outdoor recreation — and for generations Alaska Natives have fished and hunted here.

    Using the form on this page, tell the EPA to stick to its original plan to protect Bristol Bay and reject this mine proposal.

  • Tell Albertsons to Commit to Cutting Food Waste
    Food waste

    Every year 40 percent of the edible food produced in the United States is thrown away, wasting 25 percent of the country's fresh water, 80 million acres of land, and 3 billion tons of carbon emissions that went into making those products.

    Grocery stores, where most of us get our food, have a tremendous role to play in reducing this embarrassing waste and lessening the impacts of our agricultural systems on wildlife.

    That's why the Center is now asking Albertsons -- one of the country's largest grocers, which also owns mega-chains like Safeway, Lucky and Vons -- to commit to cutting its food waste in half by 2020 and publicly report its progress.

    Albertsons claims to be committed to food waste reduction, yet without accurate reporting, there's no way for customers and investors to know whether the store is meeting its goals. And while Albertsons does divert about half of its food waste from the landfill through donation and composting programs, the only way to effectively minimize the environmental harms caused by such waste is to prevent it altogether.

    Please sign our petition urging Albertsons to protect endangered wildlife, clean air and water, and healthy habitats by improving transparency around food waste and committing to cut its own in half by 2020.

  • Tell Grocery Retailer Kroger to Protect Bees
    Bee pollinating flower

    Bees are responsible for 1 of every 3 bites of food we eat. But the neonicotinoid pesticides widely used in food production are killing bees, butterflies and other pollinators, putting our food supply at risk.

    Grocery stores can help protect bees by increasing the percent of bee-friendly foods they sell. But 17 of the top 20 grocery retailers -- including Kroger, the second largest in the United States -- continue to sell food grown with bee-killing pesticides.

    The Center for Biological Diversity and partners recently celebrated a major victory in our campaign to save our pollinators when retailers True Value and Walmart agreed to phase out plants treated with neonicotinoids and products containing them from their shelves.

    Now we’re going after the grocery industry. Using the form on this page, please sign our petition asking Kroger to establish a policy to protect pollinators that includes a plan to phase out bee-killing pesticides from its supply chain.

  • Oppose Tesoro Refinery's Dangerous Expansion
    Los Angeles smog

    On May 12 the South Coast Air Quality Management District's board hastily approved a merger between Los Angeles-based oil refinery Tesoro and oil giant BP.

    This approval undermines Los Angeles Mayor Garcetti's goals with respect to the Paris Climate Agreement and represents a stark departure from California's world-renowned leadership on clean energy and climate change. It also comes despite known harms the project will cause not just in L.A. but along the entire West Coast.

    Specifically, our region's regulators dismissed evidence that Tesoro will bring dramatically increased quantities of explosive Bakken crude from North Dakota, as well as dirty tar sands from Canada. Worse yet, researchers revealed in an April report that pollution at the existing Tesoro refinery is six times higher than we've been led to believe. An expanded refinery will mean more dangerous trains rolling through our towns and more toxic chemicals polluting our air.

    Using the form on this page, join us in urging our state regulators to rescind their approval of Tesoro's plans and send the environmental impact report back to the drawing board until all project harms are adequately reviewed.

  • Keep GE Frankentrees Out of the Southeast
    Eucalyptus plantation

    A biotech company called ArborGen, Inc. has dangerous plans for the southeast United States: It wants unprecedented approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow a genetically engineered strain of "freeze-tolerant" eucalyptus to be commercially grown on massive plantations.

    This is a terrible idea. These unregulated GE tree farms will displace and destroy our natural forests, pollute and deplete our water, and endanger biodiversity.

    Eucalyptus are not native to North America -- but they do establish here and easily escape. They've wrought havoc in Hawaii, California and Florida. And now industry wants to plant millions of these frankentrees in the Southeast.

    Using the form on this page, tell the USDA we want sustainable, healthy forests thriving with native wildlife -- not a genetically engineered monoculture of invasive eucalyptus.

  • Help Save This Rare California Wildflower
    Lassics lupine

    The Lassics lupine is a rare alpine flower found in only two spots in the Six Rivers National Forest in Northern California. In late summer its pink petals stand in sharp contrast to the barren slopes where it grows. But sadly this could be the flower's very last summer if the Forest Service doesn't act quickly to prevent its extinction.

    As the climate on the talus slopes has become harsher, the dry conditions have increased seed predation and allowed chaparral to encroach. For the flower to survive, the Forest Service needs to cage the remaining plants and remove the chaparral -- but so far the agency hasn't made a move.

    In January 2016 the Center petitioned for emergency Endangered Species Act protection for the lupine, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has also failed to act.

    So please -- write to the Forest Service today and ask it to take action this summer to save the lupine, and we'll send your letter to the Fish and Wildlife Service repeating our call for safeguards.

  • Speak Out for Red Wolves
    Red wolf pups

    With only about 45 individuals left in the wild -- and only three known breeding pairs -- red wolves need the help of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to survive.

    But instead of strengthening protections for these highly endangered creatures, the Service has halted efforts to help their recovery. It wants to restrict red wolves to federal public lands in just one county in North Carolina -- and snatch any wolves that roam onto private lands out of the wild and into captivity.

    This would undermine decades of recovery work and probably condemn the wild population to extinction. Instead, the Service needs to identify additional reintroduction sites and help landowners coexist with these rare and social animals.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to the Service requesting that it take definitive action to ensure their recovery.

  • Tucson: Speak Up for Solar Power
    Rooftop solar installation

    Tucson's energy future is in trouble. A recent move by Tucson Electric Power promises to have a chilling effect on solar power in the city and could hurt all of us as a result.

    The utility has proposed a new plan for rooftop solar customers that, if approved, would cut solar credits, add new monthly charges, and create confusing and unfair rates based on the time each month when energy is used. Basically it's a ploy to prevent people who produce excess solar power from getting reimbursed at a reasonable rate. That means more profits for TEP and fewer people willing to make the switch to solar.

    We can't let this plan go through. For years now the utility has been leaning on the false claim that solar customers don't pay their fair share of costs. But what the arguments fail to take into account are the full benefits of solar contributions: They take pressure off TEP during peak-usage times and increase grid reliability -- and of course, they reduce all those nasty environmental costs that come from our dependence on fossil fuels.

    Using the form on this page, tell Arizona regulators we deserve much better and insist that they reject TEP's not-so-sunny proposal.

  • Save Our National Monuments From Trump
    Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

    Trump's attack on 27 of our national monuments is hitting high gear. After first putting a bull's-eye on Utah's Bears Ears, he's now lining up the rest of his targets.

    Please -- join our fight to save these special places, whether you're a frequent visitor or have never been but hope to see them someday.

    The 27 monuments on the chopping block cover more than 1 billion acres of America's most spectacular, culturally important and ecologically intact public lands and oceans. The places they protect range from the waters off the coast of Hawaii to Maine's Katahdin woods. 

    By ordering Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to "review" these national monuments, Trump's intent is clear: to rescind or shrink the monuments and open them up to oil and gas drilling and other forms of development. We can't let that happen.
     
    Using the form on this page, tell Trump that his executive order and unprecedented "review" are immoral and dangerous -- and help us keep our monuments protected for future generations.

    And if you can, please personalize your letter.

  • Two Ways to Fight Trump's Border Wall
    Jaguar mural

    President Trump plans to wall off the entire U.S.-Mexico border -- putting both wildlife and communities at risk of great harm. But the Center and allies are fighting that wall, and we need your help.

    Local leaders in the Tucson City Council and Pima County Board of Supervisors will be considering resolutions at their respective meetings on June 6 to formally oppose Trump's border wall -- so now is the time to raise your voice and make it clear that people in the borderlands oppose this radically destructive proposal.

    There are two things you can do to help:

    1) Using the form on this page, send a letter to the Tucson City Council and Pima County Board of Supervisors ahead of the June 6 meetings to support their resolutions opposing the border wall.

    2) Attend one or both meetings to show your support for the resolutions, and help us pack the house. Pima County's Board of Supervisors will meet Tuesday, June 6, at 9 a.m. in the Board Hearing Room, 130 W. Congress St. And Tucson City Council will also meet Tuesday, June 6, at 5:30 p.m. in City Hall, 255 W. Alameda St.

  • Speak Up for Pacific Walruses
    Pacific walruses

    Pacific walruses need Arctic sea ice for resting, socializing, and giving birth and nursing their young. Their survival depends on ice -- but it's melting out from underneath them due to climate change. Summer Arctic sea ice has shrunk by 40 percent over the past few decades and is projected to vanish within the next decade or two.

    That's why the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2008 to protect Pacific walruses as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The Service responded by putting Pacific walruses on a waiting list for protection, where they've been languishing ever since. But as a result of follow-up legal action by the Center, the Service must make a decision about whether to protect walruses by this fall.

    Studies have shown that the Endangered Species Act is 99 percent effective at preventing wildlife from going extinct. It's time for walruses to get the protection they deserve.

    Using the form on this page, take a moment now to urge the Service to protect the Pacific walrus under the Endangered Species Act before it's too late.

  • Keep GE Frankentrees Out of the Southeast
    Eucalyptus plantation

    A biotech company called ArborGen, Inc. has dangerous plans for the southeast United States: It wants unprecedented approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow a genetically engineered strain of "freeze-tolerant" eucalyptus to be commercially grown on massive plantations.

    This is a terrible idea. These unregulated GE tree farms will displace and destroy our natural forests, pollute and deplete our water, and endanger biodiversity.

    Eucalyptus are not native to North America -- but they do establish here and easily escape. They've wrought havoc in Hawaii, California and Florida. And now industry wants to plant millions of these frankentrees in the Southeast.

    Using the form on this page, tell the USDA we want sustainable, healthy forests thriving with native wildlife -- not a genetically engineered monoculture of invasive eucalyptus.

  • Protect Oklahoma's Turtles From Slaughter
    Common snapping turtle

    Oklahoma allows trappers to collect unlimited numbers of eight turtle species from private land to sell as pets or on Asian markets as food and traditional medicine.

    This level of trapping is devastating turtle populations that are already threatened by habitat destruction, water pollution and road traffic. So the Center has requested that the state of Oklahoma completely ban for-profit exploitation of the state's turtles.

    Our advocacy has successfully led to states across the country restricting turtle trapping, preventing further declines of these vulnerable animals.

    Fight for turtles -- using the form on this page, tell state wildlife officials you strongly support the Center's proposed ban on commercial trapping of Oklahoma's turtles.

  • Tell Congress: Protect Our Coasts From Offshore Drilling
    Offshore oil platform

    President Trump has signed an executive order to undo permanent protections in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans and allow even more drilling in the Pacific and Gulf of Mexico -- a dangerous decision that threatens our environment and coastal communities' health and economic well-being. From Exxon Valdez to Deepwater Horizon, repeated disasters have shown that there's simply no safe way to drill.

    That's why we need Congress to resist Trump and his reckless attacks on our oceans now. But for them to stand up to the president, they need to hear that there's strong support from people like you to keep our oceans and coasts oil free.

    Using the form on this page, please call your members in Congress and tell them to oppose any efforts to expand offshore drilling.

    Here's a sample call script, which you can paraphrase into your own words:

    Hi, my name is _____, and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to urge you to protect our coasts and climate by opposing any and all efforts to expand offshore oil and gas drilling in our oceans. Thank you.

  • Help Save Nevada's Carnivores
    Mountain lions

    Nevada's mountain lions, bobcats and coyotes play a vital role in keeping our state wild -- but these beautiful carnivores are under threat.

    Poor rules for trapping in Nevada result in the illegal killing of dozens of mountain lions every year. And state law says that 80 percent of every $3 hunting tag that's bought must be spent on lethal predator control -- which means about half a million dollars every year directly support state-sanctioned killing of thousands of coyotes and hundreds of mountain lions.

    Happily we now have a chance to change that. Forward-thinking Nevada legislators Senator David Parks and Assemblyman Mike Sprinkle have introduced bills S.B. 364 and A.B. 101 to better protect our mountain lions, bobcats and coyotes.

    S.B. 364 would require mandatory trap registration, improved signage in trapping areas and a reduced trap-check interval. These steps will reduce deaths of wildlife for which these traps are not intended -- such as mountain lions -- and improve safety for public land users and their domestic pets.

    A.B. 101 would remove the 80 percent lethal predator-control mandate, allowing the state wildlife agency to apply science-based wildlife management techniques rather than being forced to indiscriminately kill wildlife.

    Using the form on this page, help Nevada's carnivores by urging your state representatives to support S.B. 364 and A.B. 101.

  • Save Bears Ears From Trump
    Bears Ears National Monument

    Trump's attack on 27 national monuments has begun, and first on his hit list is Utah's Bears Ears National Monument. We need your help to stop him.

    Originally proposed by five American Indian tribes, the stunning, 1.3-million-acre monument protects one of North America's most culturally important landscapes. Its remote canyons, mountains, mesas and rivers also make it one of the most scenic and ecologically intact places in America.

    By ordering Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to "review" Bears Ears, Trump's intent is clear: to rescind or shrink the monument and open it for fossil fuel development. Zinke has already revealed what his recommendation will be: At the end of his "listening" session in Utah, he told Deseret News, "Bears Ears is a little large to me."
     
    Using the form on this page, help us keep Bears Ears protected for future generations by telling Trump that his executive order and unprecedented "review" are illegal, immoral and dangerous.

    And if you can, please personalize your letter.

  • Tell Amazon to Shine With Rooftop Solar
    Amazon Shine

    Amazon.com is named after a unique and threatened ecosystem that's charmed and inspired us all, yet the land and climate footprint of the company's operations pose a serious threat to biodiversity worldwide. That's why the Center for Biological Diversity has launched its new Amazon Shine campaign, urging the company to install solar panels on its huge warehouses.

    Amazon's fulfillment centers are some of the largest in the world, taking up more than 70 million square feet of space in the United States alone -- and that's not counting the land and climate impacts of powering these buildings. The entire process requires the mass extraction and transport of fossil fuels, as well as the generation and transmission of electricity over long distances.

    As a powerful, growing company, Amazon has the responsibility to consider wildlife in its decisions -- from siting future buildings to minimize wildlife impacts to meeting as much of its energy needs from rooftop solar panels as possible.

    By putting solar panels on top of its warehouses, Amazon can help lead the way toward an energy future that's better for wildlife, people and the planet. It'll also make it easier for others to follow suit.

    Amazon has responded to similar petitions before -- for instance, by committing to power its web services with 100 percent renewable energy. So join us now in asking Amazon to shine by installing solar panels on its U.S. warehouses.   

  • Protect California's Drinking Water From Toxic Oil Waste
    Pumpjack

    California state oil regulators recently asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to exempt a San Luis Obispo aquifer from protection under the Safe Drinking Water Act in order to use it as a dumping ground for toxic oil waste.

    This outrageous move would allow the oil industry to contaminate an underground water source with dangerous chemicals. In the midst of a devastating drought, polluting our precious water is unacceptable.

    We know that many similar applications across the state are waiting on the outcome of this application, which will set a precedent for the security of all other aquifers in California.

    If the EPA approves the exemption, California's precious aquifers will become trash dumps for the oil industry. This decision has a potential impact on water for thousands of communities across California.

    EPA Region 9 is considering the fate of California's water right now, and that's why they need to hear from you. Join us to demand they deny Big Oil's application to pollute.

  • Tell USDA to Promote Sustainable Diets
    Extinction Facts Label

    Research shows that we can't meet international climate targets without reducing meat and dairy consumption. The U.S. Department of Agriculture had the opportunity to include sustainability in its latest dietary guidelines, but the agency ignored the science and overwhelming public support, instead releasing recommendations that the meat industry could celebrate.

    The agency says that sustainable diets are an important policy conversation, but it remains silent about the effects of America's super-sized appetite for meat and dairy. We need that conversation now more than ever.

    Governments around the world -- including the Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden -- have published national dietary guidelines urging people to eat less meat. This advice has enormous influence. It can change how people eat and how menus are created in schools and government facilities. And ultimately it can change the quantity of greenhouse gases released into our atmosphere.

    It's time for the USDA to acknowledge that animal products demand more resources than plant-based foods and take concrete steps to address the environmental and health problems that come with high meat and dairy consumption.

    Urge the USDA to issue a public statement and plan of action to promote a sustainable American diet. Then read and share our Extinction Facts labels.

  • Protect Monterey County's Water From Toxic Oil Waste
    Pumpjack near almond orchards

    The next aquifers that California state oil regulators will consider exempting from protection under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act are in Monterey County, where last November voters passed Measure Z by an overwhelming margin. The new law couldn't be any clearer: It phases out wastewater disposal, bans fracking and prevents new wells from getting drilled. And yet unbelievably, the oil industry and regulators are now working together to undermine this law.

    This outrageous move would let the oil industry further contaminate an underground water source with dangerous chemicals. This is a blatant disregard of the will of the people.

    Now is the time to enforce Monterey County's fracking and wastewater-injection ban and protect our water from becoming a toxic garbage dump for this greedy industry.

    This shouldn't happen in Monterey County; this shouldn't happen anywhere. We know that there are many similar applications across the state. If the EPA approves these exemptions, scores of precious aquifers will be permanently contaminated.

    Since Trump's EPA won't be anything other than a rubberstamp for these applications, it's crucial that we demand that state regulators protect our water.  

    Act now to urge your state legislators and Governor Brown to hold regulators accountable and deny Big Oil's application to pollute.

  • Stand in Solidarity Against the Dakota Access Pipeline
    Amazon Shine

    The Trump administration wants to fast-track the Dakota Access pipeline -- and has already directed the Army Corps of Engineers to abandon the full environmental review ordered by President Obama, urging the agency to speed through a final permit.

    If the pipeline's completed, oil spills and water and climate pollution will be inevitable, and the continued desecration of indigenous rights will be a tragedy. Now, more than ever, we need you to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe to demand a full environmental review and ultimately the end of this terrible proposal.

    If we succeed in gaining at least a closer look, this pipeline will be forced into a years-long review of impacts to drinking water, tribal rights and the climate -- a review that will buy time and open the door to other challenges.

    But that won't happen unless millions of Americans speak up. So please take action and demand a full review from the Army Corps today.

  • End Diamondback Terrapin Trapping in New York
    Diamondback terrapin

    Diamondback terrapins have elaborately patterned shells and delightfully speckled skin. They distinguish themselves by being the only turtles in North America that live exclusively in semi-salty coastal waters.

    Sadly, these turtles have become as rare and valuable as the gems they're named after. Facing threats from hunting, entanglement in fishing gear, traffic accidents and loss of habitat, they're struggling to survive.

    But there's some good news: Thanks in part to overwhelming action from our members and supporters, New York state wildlife officials have proposed ending terrapin hunting in the state once and for all. Closing the hunting season would take some of the pressure off these turtles, giving them a chance to recover.

    Help diamondback terrapins get the fighting chance they deserve. Using the form on this page, tell state wildlife officials that you support the proposal to end terrapin hunting.

  • End Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida
    Sinkhole in phosphate mine

    Phosphate mining is one of the most destructive practices on Earth -- a brutal process that completely destroys landscapes and leaves behind 200-foot-tall, radioactive waste piles, which put people and wildlife, from gopher tortoises to sandhill cranes, at risk.

    On Aug. 27, 2016, a sinkhole opened under one of these waste piles, causing more than 200 million gallons of contaminated wastewater to enter the Floridan Aquifer. It's not the first time the state's main source of drinking water has been imperiled by the phosphate industry, nor is it likely to be the last.

    Mosaic (the largest phosphate mining company in Florida) wants to dig up an additional 50,000 acres of the state's beautiful, biodiverse lands, creating more radioactive waste. But this incident shows that Mosaic can't even handle the radioactive waste it currently generates.

    It's time for us to stand against this dangerous, destructive practice. Tell your elected officials to do everything in their power to end the blight of phosphate mining in Florida.

  • Tell Missouri to Stop Unlimited For-profit Turtle Trapping
    Snapping turtle

    Because Missouri allows commercial trappers to take unlimited numbers of turtles from the state's rivers, thousands of the state's vulnerable turtles have been caught and killed over the past 10 years. Common snapping turtles and softshell turtles are sold domestically or exported to Asian markets to be slaughtered for food and medicine.

    Commercial trapping is devastating to turtle populations that are already suffering from threats like habitat destruction, water pollution and getting hit by cars. That's why the Center for Biological Diversity and the Great Rivers Environmental Law Center have asked the Missouri Department of Conservation to ban for-profit exploitation of the state's turtles.

    In response to our petition and because of your support, the department has agreed to address for-profit turtle trapping through a formal rulemaking.

    State officials now need to hear that you support a complete ban on commercial trapping of Missouri's turtles. Please take action today.

  • End Commercial Fur Trapping in California
    Fox

    In November 2015 conservationists celebrated when the California Fish and Game Commission voted to ban bobcat trapping, an important step toward bringing the state's wildlife management into the 21st century. But the job was left undone: Foxes, coyotes, badgers and a host of other furbearing animals are still subject to cruel trapping, and it's come to light that the state's oversight of its trapping program is illegal.

    California law requires that the state's costs of managing a fur-trapping program must be fully recovered through trapping-license fees. But the state spends hundreds of thousands of dollars on wardens, biologists and administrators to oversee trapping, yet only brings in a tiny fraction of that amount in fees. Taxpayers are footing the bill for the rest.

    With any luck, that will soon end. At its upcoming meeting the commission will consider a Center for Biological Diversity petition to comply with this never-enforced provision of California law. If implemented, it could mean the end of commercial trapping in the state.

    Tell California's Fish and Game Commission that you value wildlife alive and fully support ending all commercial fur trapping in the state.

  • Don't Make This Tortoise Wait Any Longer
    Gopher tortoise

    Gopher tortoises spend their days munching leafy greens under open canopies of pine trees and industriously digging burrows to hide from extreme weather and predators. But they're also team players, sharing their burrows with hundreds of other species like rabbits, foxes, quail, owls, frogs and rare eastern indigo snakes.

    Unfortunately this keystone species is struggling to survive as its woods are destroyed to make way for pine plantations and urban development. Although western populations of gopher tortoises are protected under the Endangered Species Act, eastern populations are not -- and they continue to lose their homes and lives.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service knows these tortoises are on the road to extinction, but relegated them to a waiting list that offers them no protection. Many candidate species have gone extinct waiting for the Act's vital safeguards; the gopher tortoise has already waited for more than a decade. Time is of the essence.

    Tell the Service to protect eastern gopher tortoises before it's too late.

  • Tell EPA: Our Ocean's Not a Dump for Fracking
    Sea otter

    Fracking is an inherently dangerous and dirty activity -- whether it happens on land or offshore.

    What's more, oil companies have EPA permission to discharge up to 9 billion gallons of fracking wastewater into the ocean off California's coast -- as though it's a dump instead of a cherished home for all kinds of rare and vulnerable wildlife.

    Whales, dolphins, sea turtles and sea otters have no way of defending themselves. And the burden of proof shouldn't be on the public to decide which and how many of these chemicals are toxic. The EPA has a clear responsibility to intervene to protect our health and wildlife from oil companies fracking off our coasts.

    Using the form on this page, urge the agency to ban the toxic practice of dumping fracking chemicals into the ocean.

  • Nebraska: Say No to Keystone XL
    Oil pipes

    The Keystone XL pipeline fight is back -- and just like last time, we need your help to win. We've already sued Trump for his approval of the presidential permit that Obama rejected at your urging. But there's more to the fight: In Nebraska, TransCanada still needs another permit based on a review of the project's harms to groundwater, soil, plants and wildlife.  

    Using the form on this page, tell Nebraska's Public Service Commission to deny this license to pollute.

    At stake are toxic spills, endangered species and disastrous tar sands climate pollution. We need to stand in solidarity with the Indian tribes, farmers and communities on the front lines.

    We've beaten Keystone XL together before. Join us now to do it again.

  • Tell Walmart Developer: Stop Building on Priceless Habitat
    Bartram's scrub-hairstreak

    Outside of Everglades National Park, the lush habitat provided by pine rockland forest is becoming increasingly rare in south Florida.

    Due to urban sprawl and relentless development, this type of habitat has been reduced to just 2 percent of its original amount. And recently the University of Miami sold 88 acres of this rare habitat to Ram Realty Services -- a developer with plans to build yet another strip mall full of chains like Walmart, Chili's and Chick-fil-A.

    We can't let this happen. This land is special; it provides some of the last remaining acres for rare and imperiled plants and wildlife like the Florida bonneted bat as well as the Florida leafwing and Bartram's scrub-hairstreak, two butterflies that just received Endangered Species Act protection.

    Tell Ram we don't need another Walmart. What we need is for our native species to thrive without the constant threat of losing their homes.

  • Protect Minnesota's Boundary Waters From Copper Mining
    Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

    The 1.1-million-acre Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness is America's most visited wilderness area. Located in the Rainy River watershed in northeastern Minnesota, it includes nearly 2,000 pristine lakes and more than 1,200 miles of canoe routes. It's also great for hiking, camping, skiing, dog sledding and ice fishing, and is home to magnificent wildlife like moose, Canada lynx and wolves. It's rich with prehistoric and historic American Indian settlements.

    Along with Voyageurs National Park and Quetico Provincial Park, the Boundary Waters is part of an international network of protected land and wilderness of well over 2 million acres.

    The mining company Twin Metals has been pursuing a massive copper mine within the Rainy River watershed, just upstream from the Boundary Waters. Fortunately the Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service have halted any new mine proposals in the Rainy River watershed for the next two years due to the severe risk of perpetual, toxic water pollution.

    These agencies are now considering extending the temporary ban into a 20-year ban and are taking public comment and analyzing the risks and environmental impacts of copper mining in the Rainy River watershed. Here's where you come in.

    Using the form on this page, please tell these agencies to protect the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness from sulfide-ore copper mining.

  • Speak Up for California Wolves
    Wolf OR-25

    Although California wolves are protected as an endangered species under federal and state law, they’re at risk of accidental killing due to hunting and trapping of other species in their habitat.

    Please join the Center for Biological Diversity in urging wildlife officials to ban these practices in wolf territory in California.

    Since 2011, 11 wolves have been confirmed in northern California: pioneering wolf OR-7, the seven-member Shasta wolf family, the newly confirmed Lassen pair, and lone wolf OR-25, who occasionally visits from Oregon. But a significant threat to wolf recovery in California is a state law allowing unlimited hunting of coyotes in areas that have been designated by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife as occupied or potential wolf territory. This creates the risk that a wolf might be mistaken for a coyote and shot, especially at night when visibility is low. In some circumstances state law also allows the use of lethal traps and snares to capture other species, but a wolf could just as easily fall victim to this deadly gear.

    To address this the Center and Project Coyote filed an administrative petition last year with the commission seeking a ban on nighttime hunting and use of lethal traps in current and prospective wolf territory. Now we’re urging the commission to move quickly on this petition to prevent unintentional wolf killings.

    Using the form on this page, urge California Fish and Game Commission members to ban night hunting of coyotes and the use of lethal traps and snares in wolf habitat.

    This letter also includes a request that the commission raise trapping fees so that California’s trapping program, which isn't self-funding as required by law, no longer requires support from taxpayers who may not want their taxes going toward unlimited hunting and trapping of wildlife.

  • Protect California's Aquifers From Toxic Oil Waste
    Fracking-contaminated water

    Right now, if we don't speak up, scores of California's aquifers may become trash dumps for the oil industry.

    As you may know, state oil regulators at the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources aren't doing their job of protecting our water resources from oil-industry contamination. Roughly 1,650 wells continue to illegally inject toxic oil industry waste into groundwater aquifers. But instead of upholding the law and shutting down the wells, regulators are asking the Environmental Protection Agency to grant a pardon and waive the aquifer protections of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

    Your state senator sits on the Senate Natural Resources Committee, which has the power to hold these regulators to task. Those senators need to hear that this issue is important to you, and that the committee should hold oversight hearings of the negligent officials who have missed critical deadlines to shut down the illegal wells and continue to flout the law and common sense by sacrificing our underground water resources.

    Since the Trump EPA will never be the fierce environmental protector we need it to be, we must push hard to make sure our own state officials hold the line.

    Using the form on this page, please ask your senator to hold oversight hearings of state regulators and protect our aquifers from oil-industry contamination.

    And note -- this alert is only for California constituents with state senators on the Senate Natural Resources Committee. Find other Center alerts here.

  • Protect Appalachia From Mountaintop Removal
    Mountaintop removal

    Every day millions of pounds of explosives are detonated in Appalachia, blowing off the tops of mountains to expose seams of coal. Toxic dust billows into the air, and mining waste is dumped straight into streams, poisoning water for both people and wildlife.

    Communities near mountaintop-removal mining face significantly elevated rates of cancer, birth defects and major illness, including kidney, heart and respiratory disease. Mountaintop removal also threatens endangered fish, salamanders, bats, crayfish, and freshwater mussels found nowhere else on Earth.

    Fortunately a new bill in Congress aims to protect Appalachia from this extreme mining practice, ensuring that human health and endangered species won't be further sacrificed for the coal industry's profit.

    Using the form on this page, please contact your representatives and urge them to support the Appalachian Community Health Emergency Act (H.R. 786), which would place a moratorium on new mountaintop-removal permits.

  • Save Alabama's Rare Snakes From Senseless Slaughter
    Eastern diamondback rattlesnake

    Rattlesnakes play vital ecological roles -- especially by preying on rodents, reducing the chance they can spread disease to people.

    But the state of Alabama puts no limits on the number of eastern diamondback rattlesnakes that can be killed for their meat and skins -- and these snakes' populations are plummeting dangerously.

    In fact, in response to a legal petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided eastern diamondbacks may deserve protection under the federal Endangered Species Act due to habitat destruction, exploitation and other causes.

    Meanwhile, we can help these rattlers right now. A rule has been proposed by the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources that would protect the snakes from unpermitted collection and sales.

    Using the form on this page, take a moment to speak up for snakes.

  • Defend Texas and Oklahoma From More Fracking
    Fracking rig

    This June the Bureau of Land Management plans to auction off thousands of acres in Texas and Oklahoma for oil and gas drilling, and we need your help to stop it.

    Much is at stake: The auction will allow fracking beneath water supplies for Corpus Christi and Brenham, Texas. It'll increase the risk of new manmade earthquakes. And it'll require a massive amount of infrastructure -- new wells, pipelines, roads, wastewater pits and storage tanks -- that will threaten habitat for imperiled wildlife, from lesser prairie chickens and least terns to Arkansas River shiners.

    Last year public outcry forced the BLM to pull several parcels from its 2016 auction -- so we know officials are listening, which is good. Water supplies for Houston, Dallas, Corpus Christi and Brenham were spared. But now the agency is offering many of these same parcels again, plus more along the Canadian River and in the Black Kettle National Grassland.  

    Using the form on this page, urge the BLM, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Bureau of Reclamation to cancel this auction and protect our water, wildlife and communities from harm.

  • Tell Ohio to Ban Commercial Turtle Trapping
    Snapping turtle

    Unregulated trapping of freshwater turtles is wreaking havoc on our native turtle populations in the South and Midwest. And Ohio, which allows unlimited commercial collection of softshell and common snapping turtles, is one of the worst offenders.

    That's why the Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned the Ohio Department of Natural Resources in early 2017 to ban for-profit exploitation of the state's turtles.

    Please -- help us by sending an email to the agency supporting our petition.

    Freshwater turtles already face serious threats to their survival from habitat loss, toxic runoff and car traffic. They just can't afford to be trapped for captivity or meat. For years the Center has advocated for limits on turtle trapping -- and we've won lifesaving restrictions in states including Iowa, Alabama, Florida and Georgia. Now it's Ohio's turn to protect its heritage turtles.

    Using the form on this page, urge state officials to do the right thing by granting the Center's petition and banning commercial turtle trapping in Ohio.

  • Get Toxic Lead Out of Deer Shot in Minnesota
    Trumpeter swan

    Lead is an extremely toxic substance we've very sensibly removed from gasoline, paint and other products. But this dangerous heavy metal is still entering the food chain via lead hunting ammunition, which poisons wildlife and threatens human health.

    More than 4,000 tons of lead are shot into the environment every year in the United States. Animals that ingest spent lead shot or scavenge on contaminated carcasses can suffer for years from debilitating lead poisoning before dying painfully. And tiny lead fragments in venison can poison families who eat what they shoot.

    That's why a Minnesota lawmaker has introduced a bill (H.F. 1356) that would prohibit lead ammunition for deer hunting in Minnesota. We need you to speak up for the health of Minnesota's families and wildlife, including bald eagles and trumpeter swans.

    Using the form on this page, please tell your representative you support banning lead shot for deer hunting. (This action can only be taken by Minnesota residents.)

  • End Trophy Hunting of Nebraska's Rare Cougars
    Cougar

    Persecuted by hunters and trappers, Nebraska's cougar population was eradicated in the early 1900s. But over the past few decades, these majestic cats have begun a hopeful return to the state, establishing a population that now numbers a few dozen.

    Cougars have regained only the shakiest paw-hold in the state, but Nebraska's Game and Parks Commission is considering allowing trophy hunters to kill them. This could have catastrophic consequences for these rare cats, who are already at risk from vehicle collisions, habitat loss and poaching.

    The livestock industry likes to claim sport hunting of cougars will protect livestock. But state policy already allows cougars that threaten people or stock to be killed. And only one incident of a cougar preying on cattle has been documented in Nebraska since the return of these big cats to the state.

    Using the form on this page, ask your legislators to support Legislative Bill 448, which would repeal a 2012 statute authorizing the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission to issue permits allowing trophy hunters to kill cougars.

    Please note: You must be a Nebraska resident to take action on this alert. Find other Center alerts here.

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  • Fight Trump's EPA Rollback
    Smokestack

    The Environmental Protection Agency is under attack as it never has been before.

    President Donald Trump and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt have put together a task force to "alleviate regulatory burdens." What that really means is gutting environmental safeguards that are critical to protecting our clean air and water and reducing pollution. Their rollbacks will make more people sick, kill more wildlife and tear apart the safety net that has helped keep us safe for almost half a century.

    Using the form on this page, speak out and resist this dangerous scheme to roll back important environmental regulations at the EPA.

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    Polar bear

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  • BLM's Methane Rule Is Under Attack -- Take Action
    Methane gas flare

    On Feb. 3 industry-backed members of the U.S. House of Representatives continued their assault on the environment by using the Congressional Review Act to dismantle a common-sense rule that would cut dangerous pollution from the oil and gas sector.

    Each year oil and gas companies leak or deliberately vent millions of tons of methane into the atmosphere, compromising our health, environment and safety. Finalized in November, the Bureau of Land Management's methane rule was long overdue and promises to reduce harmful leakage from the oil and gas industry on our public lands.

    Methane is a climate pollutant that heats the atmosphere 87 times more than the same amount of carbon dioxide over a 20-year period. And reductions of methane are essential to avoid catastrophic climate tipping points and comply with the U.S. commitment to limit global warming to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius.

    And yet unbelievably, members of Congress are now working together to legislatively undermine this law and the years of work that went into it with a rarely used tool that would repeal the rule and then prevent the BLM from adopting any rule that's "substantially the same."

    Tell your senators this is flatly unacceptable. They must oppose any attempts to roll back the BLM's crucial rule.

  • Tell Rep. Pearce: No Border Wall in New Mexico
    Jaguar

    President Trump insists on a border wall that would halt the life-sustaining migration of wildlife into, and out of, the United States -- from jaguars and Mexican gray wolves to New Mexico ridge-nosed rattlesnakes. In return for killing off endangered animals, what would this massively expensive wall accomplish?

    Absolutely nothing, to judge from history and the miles of border wildlands where a destructive wall already exists. The structure will fail to stop desperate human migrants. It will drive vanishing species toward extinction. And it will stand as a monument to the senseless ruin of our beautiful Chihuahuan Desert -- unless we speak out.

    Please take a moment to call Congressman Steve Pearce at (202) 225-2365 and request that he tell Trump not to build a wall along New Mexico's border.

    We need Pearce's voice to counter Trump's crude and simplistic vision, and we need yours to show Pearce that this wall does not have local support.

    Here's a sample call script which you can paraphrase into your own words.

    Hi, my name is _______ and I'm calling from _______ .  I'd like to request that Representative Pearce tell President Trump not to build a wall along New Mexico's border. A wall would harm wildlife but would not increase border security. Also, I would like to hear back from him on specific actions he will take to ensure a wall doesn't get built and destroy our desert. Here's my contact information: _______. Thank you.

  • Wyoming: Help Stop This Anti-renewables Bill
    Wyoming wind farm

    Wyoming's energy future -- and your ability to choose renewable energy -- is in trouble.

    State Senator Larry Hicks recently introduced a bill that, if passed, would prohibit utilities from providing electricity from large-scale wind or solar by 2019, even if their customers want it or if it's the cheaper option. This would effectively stifle renewable energy growth and force you and your neighbors to keep paying for dirty fossil fuels. We can't let that happen.

    This bill would hurt Wyoming's climate, water and wildlife and could stop as many as 20,000 new and long-lasting jobs from coming to the state. It would prevent a reliable source of homegrown energy from thriving and helping the U.S. meet its energy independence goals.

    But you can do something to prevent this from happening. Urge your state representatives to vote no on this irresponsible, anti-renewables energy bill.

  • Help Save Oregon's Elliott State Forest
    Elliott State Forest

    With towering old trees and excellent habitat for endangered coho salmon, marbled murrelets and spotted owls, the Elliott State Forest is a priceless gem owned by all Oregonians. But whether you know its beauty already or hope to visit someday, now is the time to act if we're going to preserve this special place.

    Headed by Governor Kate Brown, the Department of State Lands held an auction on Dec. 13 and received a single bid from a timber company. But fortunately the department decided to delay acceptance of this bid to consider an option for keeping at least part of the Elliott in public hands.

    There are two things you can do to help save this forest:

    1) Using the form on this page, send a letter to the state land board and tell them you want the Elliott to remain protected and in public hands.

    2) Call the members of the land board and tell them that you don't want to see the Elliott sold to a private timber company. Here are the numbers to call: Gov. Kate Brown (503) 378-4582, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson (503) 986-1523, and State Treasurer Tobias Read (503) 378-4329.

  • Tell Congress: Don't Mess With Wolf Recovery
    Gray wolf

    U.S. Senators Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) and Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) recently introduced a bill to strip federal protection from wolves in Wyoming, Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin. This bill is an ugly political ploy that will result in the deaths of thousands of wolves and do serious damage to one of the America's most important endangered species success stories.

    In response to lawsuits from the Center and allies, federal judges overturned a series of bad decisions to prematurely remove Endangered Species Act protection from wolves. But with language explicitly preventing further judicial review, the new bill would reverse these court orders, end federal wolf protections, and undermine the basic rule of law and the rights of citizens to challenge illegal government actions wherever they occur.

    That means that such cruel hunting methods as steel-jaw leghold traps, strangulation snares and even packs of dogs could be unleashed on wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region.

    Tell your representatives in Congress that you won't stand for it. Urge them to vote no on H.R. 424 and S. 164 and let science and law govern wolf recovery, not politics.

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  • Demand a Stop to Attacks on Women and Wildlife
    Protester

    Donald Trump's first executive action after the historic Women's March was to reinstate the global gag rule, restricting access to reproductive healthcare and putting women's lives at risk. This response to the millions who marched for women's rights, equality and the environment sends a clear message that Donald Trump won't hesitate to pass policies that harm women, people of color and the planet.

    Congress can overturn the global gag rule, which prohibits international organizations from receiving funding if they participate in any abortion-related activity. But as soon as the current session of Congress convened Jan. 3, it began attacking women's rights and the environment. We need to stand together and keep the momentum of the Women's March going by demanding our representatives protect women's rights and reproductive freedom.

    Anti-choice Republicans are trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act and affordable access to birth control for millions of women, defund Planned Parenthood's reproductive health services, and pass a 6-week abortion ban to effectively create a federal ban on abortion. And now that Trump is in office, the stakes are even higher.

    Not only is reproductive freedom a basic human right, it is also inextricably linked to the preservation of wildlife and wild places. A woman's ability to access healthcare and prevent unplanned pregnancy is critical to reducing the pressure of human population on endangered species and fighting the effects of climate change.

    Using the form on this page, email your representatives to demand that they block any attempt to roll back access to reproductive healthcare.

    Center for Biological Diversity staff members joined hundreds of thousands this weekend in the Women's March on Washington. It was thrilling to see longtime activists as well as those who have never marched before rise together against Trump's dangerously racist, intolerant, anti-woman, anti-environmental agenda.

    We witnessed this same solidarity and commitment to action on our #Earth2Trump Roadshow of resistance, where every venue from coast to coast was filled to capacity. And we’ll need to maintain this momentum to protect the rights and values threatened by the new administration.

    In response to Donald Trump's first 100 days in office, the Center has created a 100-day plan outlining priorities, goals and methods. We're opposing Trump's attacks on our environment and values at every turn -- but we need your help. Start today by telling your representatives in no uncertain terms to protect women's rights.

  • Protect Alameda County's Water From Toxic Oil Waste
    Oil derrick

    The next aquifer that California state oil regulators will consider exempting from protection under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act -- the Greenville Sands -- lies adjacent to the city of Livermore in Alameda County.

    We know that there are many similar applications across California. Regulators are in the process of rubber-stamping operations like this one and attempting to get aquifers exempted from the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. To do so the state must first approve an application, then send it to the EPA for a final stamp. That's right -- in the middle of a drought, the industry and state want to destroy scores of aquifers that may affect thousands of people.

    If approved, exemptions would allow the oil industry to contaminate underground water sources with dangerous chemicals -- an unthinkable move even if California weren't in the midst of a devastating drought.

    This shouldn't happen in Alameda County; this shouldn't happen anywhere. Now is the time to build off Alameda County's fracking ban and protect our water from becoming a garbage dump for this toxic, greedy industry. With the possibility of a gutted EPA under Trump, California must take charge and ensure its water is protected.

    Act now to urge your state legislators to hold regulators accountable and deny Big Oil's application to pollute.

  • Tell McDonald's: Billions of Burgers Are Bad for Our Future
    Cows

    McDonald's spends hundreds of millions of dollars on ads convincing people to eat more meat. And of course, those ads fail to mention that producing those burgers is sickening our planet -- making a massive contribution to climate change and pollution and driving wildlife out of their homes.

    That's why it's quite the stretch for the fast-food giant to claim it will start sourcing its burgers from "sustainable beef" in 2016.

    At the rate McDonald's sells its burgers -- an estimated 75 per second -- the toll of that much meat production on wildlife and the planet is devastating no matter where the meat comes from. Meanwhile, McDonald's doesn't offer a single Earth-friendly entrée with plant-based protein; its only meatless options are limited to sides like salads and apple slices.

    McDonald's may not be the restaurant of choice for many environmentalists, but it's the choice of about 70 million people every day. This gives McDonald's a huge influence over the industry and the eating habits of people throughout the world -- and by extension, over our planet's future.

    Urge McDonald's to be a leader and work for real sustainability by including meatless options in its menu.

  • Stop Tar Sands Extraction in Utah
    Athabascan oil sands

    Asphalt Ridge in Utah is on its way to becoming the first large-scale tar sands extraction site in the United States -- unless we stop the Bureau of Land Management from leasing the land to foreign oil companies.

    If the project gets the green light, a Canadian corporation hopes to begin producing tar sands from a pilot facility in the Asphalt Ridge deposit near Vernal, Utah. And that's only the beginning: The company plans to ramp up production to commercial levels if funding is secured. The extraction and burning of tar sands oil would destroy wildlife habitat and contribute to the climate crisis.

    The BLM's facilitation of dirty tar sands production on our federal public lands is irresponsible and directly at odds with the need to shift quickly from fossil fuel dependence to clean, renewable resources.

    Urge the BLM to deny tar sands leasing at Asphalt Ridge.

  • Join the Fight to Save Okinawa Dugongs
    Dugong

    The governments of Japan and the United States are plowing ahead with construction of a new air base in Japan's Henoko Bay, threatening to destroy the last refuge of the critically endangered Okinawa dugong.

    And it's not just dugongs that are in harm's way: Okinawa's coral reefs support an entire world of rare, fascinating and little-known creatures -- and tragically more than half of these reefs have already disappeared due to global warming and pollution.

    Eighty percent of the Okinawan people, including their governor, oppose the base. American, Japanese and international organizations have spoken out against it. And both the U.S. Marine Mammals Commission and the World Conservation Union have confirmed that the base is a serious threat to dugongs, which are entitled to protections under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

    Construction of the offshore facility will also deplete essential freshwater supplies, increase the human population in sensitive areas, and encourage more harmful development.

    Environmental groups from both sides of the Pacific Ocean have filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Defense to stop the base. While early success in the case stalled the project for several years, the Center and allies are now back in court fighting to end the construction.

    We need your help. Urge President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to step in and halt this destructive project.

  • Resist Trump's Attacks on Our National Monuments
    Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

    President Trump has launched a devastating new attack on our public lands -- this time targeting national monuments. These monuments include more than 1 billion acres of America's most cherished natural and cultural wonders, but Trump would rather see them industrialized for corporate profit.

    We need your help to stop him in his tracks. Using the form on this page, email your members of Congress and tell them to do everything in their power to protect our national monuments.

    On April 26 Trump issued an executive order to the Interior Department to review the designation of 27 national monuments, from Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante in Utah to vast marine areas in the Pacific and Caribbean. His goal? To turn these magnificent places over to special interests like the oil, gas, coal and logging industries.

    But Trump's scheme can't succeed without support in Congress. That's why we need you to speak up now: Tell your elected officials you treasure our national monuments and urge them to fight any effort to dismantle these iconic public lands.

  • Stop Sage Grouse Hunting in California
    Sage grouse

    The state of California will soon decide whether to approve hunting of greater sage grouse, one of the state's most fascinating species, for this season. Sadly, these strutting birds with splendid plumage are vanishing across the West.

    Please join us in urging the state's wildlife commission to allow the only acceptable number of permits: zero. There must be no sage grouse hunting now.

    The state says the number of permits for sage grouse hunting in each zone will be calculated "conservatively." But California's few remaining sage grouse populations are precarious -- so continued hunting at any level will be dangerous for them.

    Last year more than 2,000 of you sent letters asking the commission to stop the hunt. It didn't listen to us then, but now we have a new opportunity to speak up for the wildlife we love.

    Using the form on this page, tell the commission -- even louder this time -- to protect California's rare, dancing sage grouse.

  • Bring Solar to Your State's Government Buildings
    California state capitol building

    To avoid catastrophic climate change we must keep fossil fuels in the ground and rapidly transition to renewable energy. A concrete step we can take toward a sustainable energy system would be installing solar panels on government buildings.

    But with a cabinet of climate deniers running the federal government, this step will require visionary leadership and political will from our state leaders.

    According to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the United States can generate enough solar energy from rooftops to meet nearly 40 percent of the nation's electricity needs. And Google's Project Sunroof found that close to 80 percent of all rooftops analyzed could host solar panels to generate clean energy. If we extend solar to parking lots, driveways and other paved spaces, the potential for distributed solar energy is even greater.

    Using the form on this page, tell your elected state officials to lead by example and put solar panels on all solar-compatible state government buildings.

    This action alert is for U.S. residents only. Find other Center actions here.

  • Get Lead Shot Out of Minnesota
    Bald eagle

    Minnesota's Department of Natural Resources has proposed a new plan to phase out toxic lead ammunition for small-game hunters on farmland "wildlife management areas."

    It's a reasonable move and one that wildlife experts have long identified as necessary. But last year, after right-wing lawmakers tried to prevent the department from restricting use of lead shot, the Center for Biological Diversity and allies had to fight back and help defeat those bills. Now we need your help again.

    The scientific evidence is extensive: Spent lead ammo enters the food chain and regularly poisons and kills bald eagles, trumpeter swans and many other birds. It also causes significant health risks for people eating wild game.

    We've removed lead from our homes, gas tanks and children's toys -- but notably not from ammunition, a persistent source of toxic lead in the environment.

    Using the form on this page, tell lawmakers you oppose any efforts to prohibit the department from doing its job to safeguard Minnesota's wildlife and people from lead shot.

  • End New Fracking in Nevada
    Nevada valley

    Nevada's water and wildlife are currently under threat from the destructive oil-drilling practice known as fracking. And while industry hasn't gotten a foothold in the state just yet, vast tracts of our beautiful and rugged public lands continue to be offered for development.  

    Here's the good news: Elected officials have introduced state Assembly Bill 159 -- a bill to outlaw new fracking in Nevada.  

    At stake are hundreds of thousands of acres of public lands, precious water, clean air and critical habitat for imperiled wildlife.

    Using the form on this page, tell your representatives to support this important bill today.

  • Save Florida's Pine Rocklands
    Florida bonneted bat

    Pine rockland forests, which provide habitat for rare and imperiled species, are increasingly scarce in South Florida outside of Everglades National Park. Due to relentless development, they has been reduced to just 2 percent of its original acreage.

    Now a developer wants to destroy some of the last remaining 88 acres to make room for a strip mall named "Coral Reef Commons," leaving dozens of plant and animal species defenseless and homeless. The only thing standing in the way of this destruction is still-pending permission from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    We need to stop this from happening. Using the form on this page, tell the Service you don't support destroying precious pine rockland forests for development.

  • Protect Whales From Crab Traps
    Entangled whale

    An increasing number of whales are being entangled in fishing gear off the U.S. West Coast, and the resulting suffering and death are sickening. Please take a moment right now to demand immediate reforms of California fishery practices to protect marine wildlife.

    Thousands of vertical fishing lines off the West Coast create a dangerous labyrinth that whales must navigate to complete their migrations. These lines get caught on whale tails and flukes, leading to laceration, infection, and death by starvation or drowning. A photographic study from 2004 to 2006 showed that at least half the humpback whales off the West Coast carry scars from entanglement. And when whales die due to entanglement, their deaths are painful and slow — one study found that fatally entangled whales can take an average of six months to die.

    And it's getting worse. Over the last three years, incidences of whale entanglement have been on a sharp rise with no signs of stopping. According to the National Marine Fisheries Service, there were 71 unique reports of whale entanglements off the West Coast in 2016 — mostly humpback whales caught in lines connected to crab traps. That's up from 61 reported whale entanglements in 2015, 30 in 2014, and an annual average of eight entanglements during the previous decade. This is a clear sign that something has gone badly awry.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter urging wildlife officials to protect whales by reassessing and updating crab fishery practices to reduce entanglements.

  • Speak Up for Oregon's Wolves
    Gray wolf pups

    As part of a standard five-year review, Oregon's wolf plan is currently being revised by the state Fish and Wildlife Commission and Department of Fish and Wildlife. Much remains the same in this draft's effort to conserve and manage these magnificent animals, but some of the proposed changes are deeply disturbing -- including, under some circumstances, allowing citizens to hunt wolves.

    The department's recent annual wolf report also brings sobering news: In just one year's time since the state prematurely removed endangered species protections, the wolf population has plateaued -- with only 1.8 percent growth last year and a decrease in overall packs and breeding pairs. This is in stark contrast to prior years' 30 percent growth. The commission members need to hear from the public now to make sure no harmful changes are made to the plan and to secure strengthened wolf protections.

    Using the form on this page, tell the commission you expect Oregon's wolf plan to protect wolves as much as possible and not weaken safeguards on behalf of the livestock and sport-hunting industries. For maximum impact, please personalize your letter.

  • Tell Congress: Don't Sell Out Our Wolves, Public Lands
    Gray wolf pup

    Republicans in Congress are poised to ram through some of their most disastrous proposals when they meet later this month to finalize the federal budget for 2017. With Trump in office, that means we need your help staying vigilant -- because we don't have a president to veto these attacks.   

    The budget process has become the place where certain politicians try to sneak through their worst ideas. Unless we make our voices heard, several bad deals could come to pass, including a cynical policy rider to end federal protections for Great Lakes wolves.    

    Using the form on this page, we need you to call your representative and senators in Congress and urge them to hold the line against these bad deals.

    Please tell them not to approve any budget that 1) guts protections for wolves and other endangered species, 2) funds the border wall, 3) expands oil and gas drilling, or 4) gives away control of America's public lands.

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ______ and I live in [City, State]. As you consider legislation for the 2017 budget, I urge you not to accept any deals that gut protections for wolves and other endangered species, fund the border wall, expand oil and gas drilling, or give away control of America's public lands. Thank you.

  • Protect Oregon Rivers From Destructive Dredge Mining
    Coho salmon

    Suction dredge mining -- vacuuming up gravel and sand from river bottoms in search of gold -- is a destructive process that can turn a clear-running mountain stream into a murky ditch. By stirring up sediment on river bottoms, it can release toxic mercury and other heavy metals left over from historic mining, where they hurt endangered fish and wildlife and threaten human health.

    Fortunately there's a law pending in the Oregon legislature that would make a temporary moratorium on suction dredge mining in essential salmon habitat permanent. This is what's needed to protect endangered coho salmon and the health of our favorite rivers and streams.

    Please take action today. Using the form on this page, urge your state legislator to support Senate Bill 3 banning suction dredge mining in salmon habitat.

  • test blind target
    ORV damage

    California's Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Program is badly in need of modernizing. Our skies are too often filled with noise and dirt. And joyriders are running roughshod over plants, animals and other precious resources, leaving scars on our deserts and forests.

    Thankfully state Senator Ben Allen (D-District 26) has just introduced California Senate Bill 249 to move important reforms forward and see that this program is managed in the future by our state parks officials for the benefit of all Californians. Please join us in supporting this new legislation.  

    As it now runs, the state's OHV-recreation program is highly permissive and does nothing to rein in well-documented harms to air and water quality, soils, plants or animals -- much of which occur in State Vehicle Recreation Areas and on federal public lands. What's more, our state gas-tax funds go directly to the program with little oversight, and this money is being used to promote increased recreation with little thought to the environmental costs. That must change.

    Using the form on this page, ask your state senator to support Sen. Allen's bill and this important step toward rational, transparent policies that will protect the resources of our state parks and public lands.

  • Montana Grizzly AA
    Grizzly bear mother and cub

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  • Rein in Off-road Recklessness in California
    ORV damage

    California's Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Program is badly in need of modernizing. Our skies are too often filled with noise and dirt. And joyriders are running roughshod over plants, animals and other precious resources, leaving scars on our deserts and forests.

    Thankfully state Senator Ben Allen (D-District 26) has just introduced California Senate Bill 249 to move important reforms forward and see that this program is managed in the future by our state parks officials for the benefit of all Californians. Please join us in supporting this new legislation.  

    As it now runs, the state's OHV-recreation program is highly permissive and does nothing to rein in well-documented harms to air and water quality, soils, plants or animals -- much of which occur in State Vehicle Recreation Areas and on federal public lands. What's more, our state gas-tax funds go directly to the program with little oversight, and this money is being used to promote increased recreation with little thought to the environmental costs. That must change.

    Using the form on this page, ask your state senator to support Sen. Allen's bill and this important step toward rational, transparent policies that will protect the resources of our state parks and public lands.

  • Urgent: Demand Trump Veto Bill Killing Alaska Wildlife
    Wolf pups

    Donald Trump will soon sign a bill stripping protections from wolves and bears on national wildlife refuges in Alaska -- and we need your help flooding the White House with demands that he stop it.

    The new law will reverse a ban on cruel hunting practices in the name of "predator control" -- but there's absolutely no sportsmanship in these hunts. The bill will allow the killing of wolves, black bears and their babies in dens; catching and killing of bears with steel-jaw leg-hold traps; and aerially gunning down bears at bait stations. 

    Resist Congress' outrageous attack on wildlife: Using the form on this page, demand that Trump veto these despicable hunting practices in Alaska.

    And note -- this alert is only for U.S. supporters. Find more actions here.

  • End Trapping of Rare Bobcats of Illinois
    Bobcat

    By the mid-1900s Illinois bobcats had been decimated by unregulated hunting, trapping and habitat loss. With protection these native wild cats have begun to make a hopeful return to the state -- but they’re in the crosshairs once again.

    Last year the Illinois legislature approved the first bobcat hunting and trapping season since 1972. In that one season 141 cats were killed for sport and fur. Further bobcat trapping could have catastrophic consequences for these rare cats, already at risk from collisions with cars, habitat loss and poaching.

    Bobcats are small, shy and pose no threats to humans. As a matter of fact, they support our health by preying on rodents, one of their primary food sources, which reduces rodent-borne disease. We can't allow bobcats to vanish from Illinois again.

    Please speak up for these beautiful native felines. Using the form on this page, tell your legislators to support Senate Bill 1981, which would amend the state's wildlife code to prohibit bobcat trapping and the purchase and sale of bobcat pelts in the state.

  • Protect California's Wildlife From Exotic Bullfrogs, Turtles
    Bullfrog

    Invasive species are widely recognized as one of the leading threats to native wildlife -- and while still important in the places where they belong, exotic bullfrogs, red-eared sliders and softshell turtles are causing serious problems in California.

    Bullfrogs eat and outcompete endangered species like California tiger salamanders and Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frogs, and they've spread the deadly chytrid fungus, which is wiping out frog populations around the world. Red-eared sliders and softshell turtles are also outcompeting California's western pond turtles and have sent them into an extinction spiral.   

    How did these invasive species end up in the state? Millions of bullfrogs and hundreds of thousands of turtles are being brought into California each year, mostly for the food and pet trades. Some of these animals escape or are intentionally set free and become established in the wild, where their invasion has devastating consequences.

    Fortunately, this may change soon. At its next meeting the California Fish and Game Commission will consider adding exotic bullfrogs and turtles to its list of restricted species, effectively ending the import and sale of these destructive animals.

    Using the form on this page, tell the commission you support this move for the sake of our native wildlife.

  • Say No to State-funded Slaughter of Oregon's Wildlife
    Coyote

    In Oregon and across the country, state and federal government agents kill native wildlife to help ranchers profit. This slaughter is unnecessary as well as cruel, since nonlethal methods have proven effective in protecting livestock from predators.

    Government wildlife killers use leg-hold traps, strangulation snares and poison devices like cyanide bombs to target coyotes, wolves and other wildlife. These indiscriminate killing methods can also hurt or kill people, pets and nontarget wildlife. Earlier this year an endangered wolf in Oregon met a tragic death when it triggered a cyanide bomb set by a taxpayer-funded predator controller tasked with killing coyotes in Wallowa County.

    Now there's good news for Oregon wildlife: In her new proposed budget, Governor Brown has proposed almost $1 million in cuts to funding for lethal control of predatory animals.

    Using the form on this page, please take a moment to thank her for standing up for wildlife and to let your state legislators know that you support the budget cuts to reduce killing native predators.

  • SALSA TEST - 170550
    Trumpeter swan

    Lead is an extremely toxic substance we've very sensibly removed from gasoline, paint and other products. But this dangerous heavy metal is still entering the food chain via lead hunting ammunition, which poisons wildlife and threatens human health.

    More than 4,000 tons of lead are shot into the environment every year in the United States. Animals that ingest spent lead shot or scavenge on contaminated carcasses can suffer for years from debilitating lead poisoning before dying painfully. And tiny lead fragments in venison can poison families who eat what they shoot.

    That's why a Minnesota lawmaker has introduced a bill (H.F. 1356) that would prohibit lead ammunition for deer hunting in Minnesota. We need you to speak up for the health of Minnesota's families and wildlife, including bald eagles and trumpeter swans.

    Using the form on this page, please tell your representative you support banning lead shot for deer hunting. (This action can only be taken by Minnesota residents.)

  • Get Toxic Lead Out of Illinois State Parks
    Bald eagle

    Lead is an extremely toxic substance we've rightly removed from gasoline, paint and many other products. But unbelievably this dangerous heavy metal is still entering the food chain via lead hunting ammunition, which poisons wildlife and threatens human health.

    More than 4,000 tons of lead are shot into the environment every year in the United States. Animals that ingest spent lead ammunition or scavenge on contaminated carcasses can suffer for years from debilitating lead poisoning before dying painfully. And tiny lead fragments in game meat poison hunting families who eat what they shoot.

    That's why an Illinois state lawmaker has introduced a bill (S.B. 1985) that would prohibit lead ammo for hunting in state parks and natural areas. We need you to speak up for the health of families and wildlife in Illinois, including bald eagles.

    Using the form on this page, tell your elected officials you support this commonsense bill to get the lead out of Illinois state parks once and for all.

  • Help Nevada Lead the Way in Renewable Energy
    Sunrise

    Since 2015 leading solar companies ceased operations in Nevada, laid off employees and left the sunny state because utility regulators decided to increase costs for all small commercial and residential solar customers. But a new bill proposed in the state legislature can help restore Nevada as a leader in renewable energy and bring the solar market back to life.

    Assembly Bill 206 would increase the state's renewable portfolio standard -- the percent of energy from renewable sources -- to 80 percent by 2040, making it one of the most ambitious standards in the country. We need you to tell your state reps to support this important bill and help Nevada reach its full potential.

    An ambitious RPS target alone, though, can't replace what Nevada lost when the utilities put the brakes on rooftop solar. A "distributed energy system" with many small sources connected to a grid is better than massive solar arrays in the desert because it prevents energy loss that occurs during long-distance transmission. A distributed system also creates local jobs, reduces land and water use, and allows more people to participate in the market. What the proposed RPS target can do is set the stage for Nevada officials to prioritize distributed solar over mega-projects that would threaten wildlife and public lands.

    Those with vested interests, of course, will be working to fight this bill and keep us hooked on fossil fuels -- so act now and urge your legislators to pass A.B. 206 and restore Nevada's place as a leader in clean, renewable energy.

  • Tell the EPA to Regulate Factory Farms
    Agricultural waste

    Industrial animal agriculture is one of the biggest threats to safe, clean water for people and wildlife. But although the Environmental Protection Agency acknowledges that factory farms are a leading source of water pollution, it allows most of them to operate without a Clean Water Act permit.

    Industrially raised meat, dairy and egg operations produce massive amounts of polluting waste. Pollutants in the waste include antibiotics, pesticides, hormones, nutrients, salts, heavy metals and other trace elements, as well as more than 150 pathogens associated with human health risks. Factory farms have already polluted more than 35,000 miles of our rivers, contaminated groundwater, and imperiled wetlands, lakes and estuaries -- as well as the species that depend on these habitats.

    Animal agriculture operations must be brought into the Clean Water Act permitting program to protect people, wildlife and the environment.

    Using the form on this page, urge the EPA to protect safe and clean water by regulating factory farms.

  • SalsaStaff 169625: Copy of Save the Vaquita
    Vaquita

    The vaquita -- the world's smallest and most endangered porpoise -- lives only in Mexico's northern Gulf of California. After suffering decades of decline due to entanglement in shrimp-fishing gear, vaquitas are down to only 30 individuals left on Earth.

    Without swift, strong action on the part of Mexico, they could disappear forever by 2020. But Mexico has failed to keep its promises to save the vaquita. Its latest measure -- a temporary, two-year ban on the use of vaquita-killing gillnets, established in April 2015 -- has been inadequate and unenforced. Vaquitas are still dying as gillnet use continues, in blatant violation of the ban. Vessels large and small, including shrimp boats, have been caught fishing illegally inside the vaquita refuge area, and the refuge is littered with illegal totoaba nets.

    It's time for us to put pressure on Mexico to do the right thing. Using the form on this page, tell Mexican officials that you'll be participating in an international boycott of Mexican shrimp until they step up enforcement and permanently ban all dangerous gillnets in vaquita habitat.

  • Stop Mojave Desert Water Grab
    Peninsular bighorn sheep

    The Cadiz Valley aquifer is an ancient groundwater basin in the heart of the Mojave Desert. It supplies water to springs and seeps in the Mojave Trails National Monument and Mojave National Preserve, sustaining wildlife including imperiled desert tortoises and bighorn sheep.

    Now the Cadiz Corporation wants to pump water from the aquifer to sell for a profit to municipalities along the Southern California coast. How much water is at stake? About 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year -- for the next 50 years. This dewatering will devastate a wide area of the Mojave, already struggling with climate change-induced drought.

    Cadiz Corporation is claiming that due to the location of the project, no federal environmental review for their project is needed. Hogwash.

    Please take a moment right now to tell Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and officials at the Bureau of Land Management to require a full, transparent environmental review of the Cadiz water project.

  • SalsaStaff 169625: Copy of Save the Vaquita
    Vaquita

    The vaquita -- the world's smallest and most endangered porpoise -- lives only in Mexico's northern Gulf of California. After suffering decades of decline due to entanglement in shrimp-fishing gear, vaquitas are down to only 30 individuals left on Earth.

    Without swift, strong action on the part of Mexico, they could disappear forever by 2020. But Mexico has failed to keep its promises to save the vaquita. Its latest measure -- a temporary, two-year ban on the use of vaquita-killing gillnets, established in April 2015 -- has been inadequate and unenforced. Vaquitas are still dying as gillnet use continues, in blatant violation of the ban. Vessels large and small, including shrimp boats, have been caught fishing illegally inside the vaquita refuge area, and the refuge is littered with illegal totoaba nets.

    It's time for us to put pressure on Mexico to do the right thing. Using the form on this page, tell Mexican officials that you'll be participating in an international boycott of Mexican shrimp until they step up enforcement and permanently ban all dangerous gillnets in vaquita habitat.

  • Save the Vaquita -- Boycott Mexican Shrimp
    Vaquita

    Vaquitas -- the world's smallest and most endangered porpoises -- live only in Mexico's northern Gulf of California. After suffering decades of decline due to entanglement in shrimp-fishing gear, vaquitas are down to only 30 individuals left on Earth.

    Without swift, strong action by the Mexican government, they could disappear forever by 2020. But Mexico has failed to keep its promises to save the vaquita. Its latest measure -- a temporary, two-year ban on the use of vaquita-killing gillnets, established in April 2015 -- has been inadequate and unenforced. Vaquitas are still dying as gillnet use continues, in blatant violation of the ban. Vessels large and small, including shrimp boats, have been caught fishing illegally inside the vaquita refuge area, and the refuge is littered with illegal totoaba nets.

    It's time for us to put pressure on Mexico to do the right thing. Using the form on this page, tell Mexican officials that you'll be participating in an international boycott of Mexican shrimp until they step up enforcement and permanently ban all dangerous gillnets in vaquita habitat.

  • End Trophy Hunting of Nebraska's Rare Cougars
    Cougar

    Persecuted by hunters and trappers, Nebraska's cougar population was eradicated in the early 1900s. But over the past few decades, these majestic cats have begun a hopeful return to the state, establishing a population that now numbers a few dozen.

    Cougars have regained only the shakiest paw-hold in the state, but Nebraska's Game and Parks Commission is considering allowing trophy hunters to kill them. This could have catastrophic consequences for these rare cats, who are already at risk from vehicle collisions, habitat loss and poaching.

    The livestock industry likes to claim sport hunting of cougars will protect livestock. But state policy already allows cougars that threaten people or stock to be killed. And only one incident of a cougar preying on cattle has been documented in Nebraska since the return of these big cats to the state.

    Using the form on this page, ask your legislators to support Legislative Bill 448, which would repeal a 2012 statute authorizing the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission to issue permits allowing trophy hunters to kill cougars.

    Please note: You must be a Nebraska resident to take action on this alert. Find other Center alerts here.

  • Speak Up for North Cascades Grizzly Bears
    Grizzly bear

    Good news for America's iconic grizzly bears: Federal agencies have released a new draft environmental impact statement and plan for restoring a healthy grizzly population in the North Cascades in Washington state. Grizzlies were once plentiful in this area, but now fewer than 10 may remain.

    Three of the proposed alternatives in the draft environmental impact statement lay out plans to augment the struggling North Cascades grizzly bear population under different timelines, in addition to a "no-action" alternative. But without agency action, grizzly bears in the North Cascades are at a serious risk of local extinction.

    Please take a moment to voice your support for the plan alternative that best ensures grizzly bear recovery in balance with the needs of people: Alternative C. With our help, grizzlies can return to the North Cascades.

    The agencies involved have specifically stated that they will not be taking bulk comments, so it's even more important than usual that you edit the sample letter we've provided to personalize it.

    In your own words, state why grizzly bear recovery in Washington state matters to you. Comments are due on April 28, so please take action today.

  • Speak Up for Endangered Cook Inlet Beluga Whales
    Beluga whales

    For more than two months, an offshore pipeline has been leaking large quantities of natural gas into Alaska's Cook Inlet. The leak threatens Cook Inlet beluga whales, a genetically distinct, endangered population that has dwindled to just 340 individuals.

    Yet the company that owns the pipeline, Hilcorp Alaska, has no intention of shutting down the leak until sea ice clears later this month. We must let state officials know that this is unacceptable.

    Natural gas pollution limits the amount of oxygen in the water, creating dead zones that hurt belugas, their prey, and other wildlife. The escaped gas -- which is 99 percent methane, a powerful greenhouse gas -- is entering not just the water but also the atmosphere, damaging our climate.

    The Center for Biological Diversity intends to sue Hilcorp over this leak for violating the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, Endangered Species Act and the Pipeline Safety Act.

    You can help by using the form on this page to demand that state and federal officials take immediate action to stop the leak.

  • Stop Trump's Plan to Frack California's Public Lands
    Oil drilling

    Four years ago a lawsuit by the Center for Biological Diversity shut down oil leasing on federal lands in California. But now the Trump administration wants to restart leasing in the state and auction off our public lands to oil companies. The Bureau of Land Management is considering a plan to open up more than 700,000 acres in central and Northern California to new fossil fuel development, including fracking.

    A drilling and fracking boom will devastate these wildlands and neighboring communities and risk irreparable harm to our air and water. Opening up hundreds of thousands of acres to new oil and gas exploration is also terrible climate policy and will undercut our state's commitment to clean, renewable energy. Given the Trump administration's open hostility toward environmental protection, California's leadership on this front is absolutely crucial.

    Using the form on this page, send a letter to the BLM demanding that it stop leasing land to the oil industry.

  • Get Toxic Lead Out of Deer Shot in Minnesota
    Trumpeter swan

    Lead is an extremely toxic substance we've very sensibly removed from gasoline, paint and other products. But this dangerous heavy metal is still entering the food chain via lead hunting ammunition, which poisons wildlife and threatens human health.

    More than 4,000 tons of lead are shot into the environment every year in the United States. Animals that ingest spent lead shot or scavenge on contaminated carcasses can suffer for years from debilitating lead poisoning before dying painfully. And tiny lead fragments in venison can poison families who eat what they shoot.

    That's why a Minnesota lawmaker has introduced a bill (H.F. 1356) that would prohibit lead ammunition for deer hunting in Minnesota. We need you to speak up for the health of Minnesota's families and wildlife, including bald eagles and trumpeter swans.

    Using the form on this page, please tell your representative you support banning lead shot for deer hunting. (This action can only be taken by Minnesota residents.)

  • These 78 Orcas Need Your Help
    Southern Resident killer whales

    The National Marine Fisheries Service is at last seeking public input on a proposal from the Center for Biological Diversity and allies to create a protection zone for Southern Resident killer whales near Washington's San Juan Island. It's a key feeding area but is overrun by noisy boat traffic -- and that's disrupting the endangered whales' ability to communicate, hunt and rest.     

    Please join us in urging the feds to protect these famous orcas, who can be found each winter along the West Coast, from central California to southeast Alaska.

    The Southern Resident killer whale population has dropped to just 78 individuals and remains threatened by lack of food due to declining salmon runs, pollution and noise. A protection zone would be a huge break. Vessel traffic in the 10-square-mile area would be prohibited April 1 to Sept. 30, and there would be a "no wake" speed limit.

    Using the form on this page, urge the Fisheries Service to follow through with these protections near San Juan Island -- and remind the agency that it's also long overdue in safeguarding the orcas' extensive winter habitat.

  • Defend Texas and Oklahoma From More Fracking
    Fracking rig

    This June the Bureau of Land Management plans to auction off thousands of acres in Texas and Oklahoma for oil and gas drilling, and we need your help to stop it.

    Much is at stake: The auction will allow fracking beneath water supplies for Corpus Christi and Brenham, Texas. It'll increase the risk of new manmade earthquakes. And it'll require a massive amount of infrastructure -- new wells, pipelines, roads, wastewater pits and storage tanks -- that will threaten habitat for imperiled wildlife, from lesser prairie chickens and least terns to Arkansas River shiners.

    Last year public outcry forced the BLM to pull several parcels from its 2016 auction -- so we know officials are listening, which is good. Water supplies for Houston, Dallas, Corpus Christi and Brenham were spared. But now the agency is offering many of these same parcels again, plus more along the Canadian River and in the Black Kettle National Grassland.  

    Using the form on this page, urge the BLM, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Bureau of Reclamation to cancel this auction and protect our water, wildlife and communities from harm.

  • Tell Gov. Brown: Stop the Lost Valley Mega-dairy
    North Fork Umatilla River

    In October 2016 we asked you to join us in urging the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and Oregon Department of Agriculture to deny a Clean Water Act permit to a 30,000-head mega-dairy in the Umatilla River basin.

    You responded in force to protect the state's water, public health and wildlife -- thank you. Unfortunately, state agencies are still heading down the disastrous path to approving this permit. It's up to us to push back even harder.

    Please write Gov. Kate Brown today urging her to stop the proposed Lost Valley Ranch.


    Thirty thousand cows will generate as much feces and urine as a medium-to-large city. This creates serious water-quality concerns for the Umatilla River basin, which supports an incredible range of wildlife -- including two kinds of fish protected under the Endangered Species Act (bull trout and summer steelhead).

    The developers of the mega-dairy also intend to withdraw approximately 890,000 gallons of water per day from the lower Umatilla River. Species already hurt by water withdrawal and diversions for agriculture, degraded water quality, and increased sedimentation will be placed at even higher risk.

    Using the form on this page, urge Gov. Brown to do everything in her power to stop the destructive Lost Valley Ranch mega-dairy.

  • Tell Ohio to Ban Commercial Turtle Trapping
    Snapping turtle

    Unregulated trapping of freshwater turtles is wreaking havoc on our native turtle populations in the South and Midwest. And Ohio, which allows unlimited commercial collection of softshell and common snapping turtles, is one of the worst offenders.

    That's why the Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned the Ohio Department of Natural Resources in early 2017 to ban for-profit exploitation of the state's turtles.

    Please -- help us by sending an email to the agency supporting our petition.

    Freshwater turtles already face serious threats to their survival from habitat loss, toxic runoff and car traffic. They just can't afford to be trapped for captivity or meat. For years the Center has advocated for limits on turtle trapping -- and we've won lifesaving restrictions in states including Iowa, Alabama, Florida and Georgia. Now it's Ohio's turn to protect its heritage turtles.

    Using the form on this page, urge state officials to do the right thing by granting the Center's petition and banning commercial turtle trapping in Ohio.

  • Protect Appalachia From Mountaintop Removal
    Mountaintop removal

    Every day millions of pounds of explosives are detonated in Appalachia, blowing off the tops of mountains to expose seams of coal. Toxic dust billows into the air, and mining waste is dumped straight into streams, poisoning water for both people and wildlife.

    Communities near mountaintop-removal mining face significantly elevated rates of cancer, birth defects and major illness, including kidney, heart and respiratory disease. Mountaintop removal also threatens endangered fish, salamanders, bats, crayfish, and freshwater mussels found nowhere else on Earth.

    Fortunately a new bill in Congress aims to protect Appalachia from this extreme mining practice, ensuring that human health and endangered species won't be further sacrificed for the coal industry's profit.

    Using the form on this page, please contact your representatives and urge them to support the Appalachian Community Health Emergency Act (H.R. 786), which would place a moratorium on new mountaintop-removal permits.

  • Say No to South Africa's Proposed Rhino-horn Market
    Black rhino

    Every eight hours a rhino is illegally killed in Africa to feed the demand for hunting trophies, jewelry and horns mistakenly believed to possess medicinal value. That's why it's so frustrating that South Africa is now proposing to break from the international norm banning all commercial rhino-horn trade by opening a new, legal market domestically.

    Allowing sales of horn will do serious injury to imperiled black and white rhinos, making law enforcement difficult and sending a terrible message to Asian nations struggling to crack down on their own demand for horn. After all, if South Africa doesn't care about its rhinos, why should Vietnam or China or anywhere else?

    Using the form on this page, urge South Africa's environmental officials to keep the country's rhino-horn market closed and shut down all attempts to profit from these rare, prehistoric animals.

  • Defend Alaska's Wildlife From Congressional Attack
    Grizzly bears

    As part of its ongoing attack on wildlife and all things done by President Obama, Congress is poised to strip protections from wolves and bears on national wildlife refuges in Alaska -- and we need your help to stop it.

    Under the guise of "predator control," Alaska currently allows inhumane hunting practices within its borders that have absolutely no basis in science. These tactics include killing wolves and their pups during denning season, killing black bear cubs and their mothers at den sites, catching and killing bears with steel-jaw leghold traps, and aerially gunning down bears at bait stations.

    After a long and contentious effort to reform Alaska's cruel practices, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took action in August 2016 to protect these animals on national wildlife refuges. The Center for Biological Diversity is already in court defending this rule from challenges by the state of Alaska and trophy hunters -- now we have to defend it from Congress. The U.S House of Representatives passed a resolution to repeal this rule, and now the Senate is poised to do the same.

    Tell your senators this is flatly unacceptable; a refuge isn't a killing field. They must oppose any attempt to roll back the Service's rule.

  • Two Ways to Fight the Atlantic Coast Pipeline
    Blue Ridge Mountains

    President Trump has declared the Atlantic Coast Pipeline one of his top 50 pet projects, but there are still important hurdles for his administration to clear, and this deal is far from done. That's why we need your help now speaking out.

    If this destructive project comes to pass, a 554-mile pipeline will carry natural gas from the fracking fields of West Virginia across the Blue Ridge Mountains to southeast Virginia and North Carolina. It will traverse more than 20 steep mountains, require clearcutting of our national forests, and cross more than 1,900 rivers and streams. It will also pass through areas susceptible to landslides and require the use of aerial pesticide spraying to keep the right of way clear of vegetation.

    On Dec. 30 the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission released the draft environmental impact statement for this pipeline, but unfortunately the analysis was severely inadequate.

    There are two things you can do to help:

    1) Using the form on this page, send a letter to FERC urging the agency to overhaul its draft environmental impact statement. It must complete a full review of all potential harms to our water, land and climate.

    2) Join us for a public hearing on Thursday, Feb. 16, at 5 p.m. to urge FERC to reject fracked gas and the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. The hearing will be at The Hilton Garden Inn in Suffolk. RSVP and get more details.

  • Actions 3.0 Backup
    Rex Tillerson

    We need your help right now to stop Congress from approving former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as U.S. secretary of state.

    Handing over control of the State Department to the man who's been running the world's largest oil company for the past decade would unleash more devastating fossil fuel extraction around the world -- dooming our climate, lands and water to a hellish future as Tillerson uses a government institution to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people.

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Tillerson's appointment. And note: Voice mailboxes in Washington, D.C., have reportedly been full, so find numbers for your senators' state offices here.

    Trump's nomination of Tillerson is one of the worst in U.S. history. Over the past 10 years, with Tillerson at its helm, Exxon has used its enormous power to ruthlessly push for more oil and gas extraction, no matter the environmental and human costs. Tillerson hid Exxon's own research documenting the grave danger of global warming while funding right-wing think tanks to deny its existence.

    As the cabinet member charged with implementing the president's foreign policy, the secretary of state will decide the fate of both the Keystone XL pipeline and the Paris Climate Agreement. Please take just a few minutes to call your senators now. 

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to stop Rex Tillerson's confirmation as secretary of state. It's totally unacceptable to turn the State Department over to the former CEO of ExxonMobil to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people. With Tillerson in charge, oil industry profits would take priority over protecting our climate, and human rights would be cast aside.

    I strongly urge you to oppose his confirmation. Thank you.

  • Actions 3.0 Backup
    Rex Tillerson

    We need your help right now to stop Congress from approving former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as U.S. secretary of state.

    Handing over control of the State Department to the man who's been running the world's largest oil company for the past decade would unleash more devastating fossil fuel extraction around the world -- dooming our climate, lands and water to a hellish future as Tillerson uses a government institution to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people.

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Tillerson's appointment. And note: Voice mailboxes in Washington, D.C., have reportedly been full, so find numbers for your senators' state offices here.

    Trump's nomination of Tillerson is one of the worst in U.S. history. Over the past 10 years, with Tillerson at its helm, Exxon has used its enormous power to ruthlessly push for more oil and gas extraction, no matter the environmental and human costs. Tillerson hid Exxon's own research documenting the grave danger of global warming while funding right-wing think tanks to deny its existence.

    As the cabinet member charged with implementing the president's foreign policy, the secretary of state will decide the fate of both the Keystone XL pipeline and the Paris Climate Agreement. Please take just a few minutes to call your senators now. 

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to stop Rex Tillerson's confirmation as secretary of state. It's totally unacceptable to turn the State Department over to the former CEO of ExxonMobil to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people. With Tillerson in charge, oil industry profits would take priority over protecting our climate, and human rights would be cast aside.

    I strongly urge you to oppose his confirmation. Thank you.

  • Actions 3.0 Backup
    Rex Tillerson

    We need your help right now to stop Congress from approving former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as U.S. secretary of state.

    Handing over control of the State Department to the man who's been running the world's largest oil company for the past decade would unleash more devastating fossil fuel extraction around the world -- dooming our climate, lands and water to a hellish future as Tillerson uses a government institution to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people.

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Tillerson's appointment. And note: Voice mailboxes in Washington, D.C., have reportedly been full, so find numbers for your senators' state offices here.

    Trump's nomination of Tillerson is one of the worst in U.S. history. Over the past 10 years, with Tillerson at its helm, Exxon has used its enormous power to ruthlessly push for more oil and gas extraction, no matter the environmental and human costs. Tillerson hid Exxon's own research documenting the grave danger of global warming while funding right-wing think tanks to deny its existence.

    As the cabinet member charged with implementing the president's foreign policy, the secretary of state will decide the fate of both the Keystone XL pipeline and the Paris Climate Agreement. Please take just a few minutes to call your senators now. 

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to stop Rex Tillerson's confirmation as secretary of state. It's totally unacceptable to turn the State Department over to the former CEO of ExxonMobil to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people. With Tillerson in charge, oil industry profits would take priority over protecting our climate, and human rights would be cast aside.

    I strongly urge you to oppose his confirmation. Thank you.

  • Actions 3.0 Backup
    Sea turtle

    The Northern Rockies fisher is equal parts cute and ferocious. A cat-like member of the weasel family with round ears, a bushy tail and a plush coat, this carnivore is also one of the few specialized predators of porcupines. (They bite them on the face till they die, then eat them, starting with their quill-free underbellies.)

    These unique carnivores are also imperiled: Once ranging from Canada to Utah, they now survive only in small populations along the border of Montana and northern Idaho.

    But there's good news for Northern Rockies fishers. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced earlier this month that it's considering protecting them and their habitat under the Endangered Species Act. Fishers desperately need this protection to limit continued threats to their survival, which include logging and trapping.

    Using the form on this page, tell the Fish and Wildlife Service to protect Northern Rockies fishers under the Endangered Species Act so these fascinating animals aren’t lost forever to extinction.

  • Actions 3.0 Backup
    Sea turtle

    The Northern Rockies fisher is equal parts cute and ferocious. A cat-like member of the weasel family with round ears, a bushy tail and a plush coat, this carnivore is also one of the few specialized predators of porcupines. (They bite them on the face till they die, then eat them, starting with their quill-free underbellies.)

    These unique carnivores are also imperiled: Once ranging from Canada to Utah, they now survive only in small populations along the border of Montana and northern Idaho.

    But there's good news for Northern Rockies fishers. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced earlier this month that it's considering protecting them and their habitat under the Endangered Species Act. Fishers desperately need this protection to limit continued threats to their survival, which include logging and trapping.

    Using the form on this page, tell the Fish and Wildlife Service to protect Northern Rockies fishers under the Endangered Species Act so these fascinating animals aren’t lost forever to extinction.

  • Protect California's Aquifers From Toxic Oil Waste
    Fracking-contaminated water

    Right now, if we don't speak up, scores of California's aquifers may become trash dumps for the oil industry.

    As you may know, state oil regulators at the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources aren't doing their job of protecting our water resources from oil-industry contamination. Roughly 1,650 wells continue to illegally inject toxic oil industry waste into groundwater aquifers. But instead of upholding the law and shutting down the wells, regulators are asking the Environmental Protection Agency to grant a pardon and waive the aquifer protections of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

    Your state senator sits on the Senate Natural Resources Committee, which has the power to hold these regulators to task. Those senators need to hear that this issue is important to you, and that the committee should hold oversight hearings of the negligent officials who have missed critical deadlines to shut down the illegal wells and continue to flout the law and common sense by sacrificing our underground water resources.

    Since the Trump EPA will never be the fierce environmental protector we need it to be, we must push hard to make sure our own state officials hold the line.

    Using the form on this page, please ask your senator to hold oversight hearings of state regulators and protect our aquifers from oil-industry contamination.

    And note -- this alert is only for California constituents with state senators on the Senate Natural Resources Committee. Find other Center alerts here.

  • Protect Coral Reefs at Port Everglades
    Elkhorn coral

    Just a few miles off the Florida coast lies the third-largest coral barrier reef system in the world. These corals, which range from 5,000 to 7,000 years old, are in drastic decline because of climate change and human activity.

    Fortunately we now have an opportunity to help Florida's coral reefs.


    Due in part to a lawsuit by the Center for Biological Diversity and allies, the Army Corps of Engineers has agreed to reassess the environmental impacts of the Port Everglades expansion. The Corps is inviting written comments and hosting two public meetings, and will use the public’s feedback to conduct a new environmental study.

    Dredging for another project -- the PortMiami expansion -- caused unanticipated, widespread damage to corals. Instead of the minimal harm the Corps had expected, hundreds of coral colonies and more than 250 acres of reef that provide critical habitat for protected staghorn corals were hurt by fine-grained sediment. The National Marine Fisheries Service reports that 95 percent of the surveyed reef is no longer suitable habitat for coral, and much of it will never recover naturally.

    We must stop this from happening to corals in Port Everglades.

    Using the form on this page, please write to the Army Corps to let it know that you expect it to protect Florida's corals and their habitat.

  • BLM's Methane Rule Is Under Attack -- Take Action
    Methane gas flare

    On Feb. 3 industry-backed members of the U.S. House of Representatives continued their assault on the environment by using the Congressional Review Act to dismantle a common-sense rule that would cut dangerous pollution from the oil and gas sector.

    Each year oil and gas companies leak or deliberately vent millions of tons of methane into the atmosphere, compromising our health, environment and safety. Finalized in November, the Bureau of Land Management's methane rule was long overdue and promises to reduce harmful leakage from the oil and gas industry on our public lands.

    Methane is a climate pollutant that heats the atmosphere 87 times more than the same amount of carbon dioxide over a 20-year period. And reductions of methane are essential to avoid catastrophic climate tipping points and comply with the U.S. commitment to limit global warming to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius.

    And yet unbelievably, members of Congress are now working together to legislatively undermine this law and the years of work that went into it with a rarely used tool that would repeal the rule and then prevent the BLM from adopting any rule that's "substantially the same."

    Tell your senators this is flatly unacceptable. They must oppose any attempts to roll back the BLM's crucial rule.

  • Give Sea Turtles a Chance to Swim Free of Deadly Nets
    Sea turtle

    The National Marine Fisheries Service is at last proposing lifesaving measures to keep sea turtles safe from shrimp trawls. Every year thousands of turtles needlessly drown in these nets set in the Gulf of Mexico and south Atlantic Ocean. Turtle-excluder devices, or TEDs, allow them to escape the nets -- but they're not yet an industry standard.

    The proposed rule would require the use of TEDs for all shrimp trawls, saving thousands of sea turtles. And it would particularly benefit the Gulf shrimp fishery, whose image is tarnished by this bycatch.

    Using the form on this page, please contact the Fisheries Service today and let it know you support its proposal to save sea turtles with this common-sense measure.

  • Tell Rep. Pearce: No Border Wall in New Mexico
    Jaguar

    President Trump insists on a border wall that would halt the life-sustaining migration of wildlife into, and out of, the United States -- from jaguars and Mexican gray wolves to New Mexico ridge-nosed rattlesnakes. In return for killing off endangered animals, what would this massively expensive wall accomplish?

    Absolutely nothing, to judge from history and the miles of border wildlands where a destructive wall already exists. The structure will fail to stop desperate human migrants. It will drive vanishing species toward extinction. And it will stand as a monument to the senseless ruin of our beautiful Chihuahuan Desert -- unless we speak out.

    Please take a moment to call Congressman Steve Pearce at (202) 225-2365 and request that he tell Trump not to build a wall along New Mexico's border.

    We need Pearce's voice to counter Trump's crude and simplistic vision, and we need yours to show Pearce that this wall does not have local support.

    Here's a sample call script which you can paraphrase into your own words.

    Hi, my name is _______ and I'm calling from _______ .  I'd like to request that Representative Pearce tell President Trump not to build a wall along New Mexico's border. A wall would harm wildlife but would not increase border security. Also, I would like to hear back from him on specific actions he will take to ensure a wall doesn't get built and destroy our desert. Here's my contact information: _______. Thank you.

  • Stand in Solidarity Against the Dakota Access Pipeline
    Amazon Shine

    The Trump administration wants to fast-track the Dakota Access pipeline -- and has already directed the Army Corps of Engineers to abandon the full environmental review ordered by President Obama, urging the agency to speed through a final permit.

    If the pipeline's completed, oil spills and water and climate pollution will be inevitable, and the continued desecration of indigenous rights will be a tragedy. Now, more than ever, we need you to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe to demand a full environmental review and ultimately the end of this terrible proposal.

    If we succeed in gaining at least a closer look, this pipeline will be forced into a years-long review of impacts to drinking water, tribal rights and the climate -- a review that will buy time and open the door to other challenges.

    But that won't happen unless millions of Americans speak up. So please take action and demand a full review from the Army Corps today.

  • Save the Northern Rockies Fisher
    Fisher

    The Northern Rockies fisher is equal parts cute and ferocious. A cat-like member of the weasel family with round ears, a bushy tail and a plush coat, this carnivore is also one of the few specialized predators of porcupines. (They bite them on the face till they die, then eat them, starting with their quill-free underbellies.)

    These unique carnivores are also imperiled: Once ranging from Canada to Utah, they now survive only in small populations along the border of Montana and northern Idaho.

    But there's good news for Northern Rockies fishers. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced earlier this month that it's considering protecting them and their habitat under the Endangered Species Act. Fishers desperately need this protection to limit continued threats to their survival, which include logging and trapping.

    Using the form on this page, tell the Fish and Wildlife Service to protect Northern Rockies fishers under the Endangered Species Act so these fascinating animals aren’t lost forever to extinction.

  • Protect Monterey County's Water From Toxic Oil Waste
    Pumpjack near almond orchards

    The next aquifers that California state oil regulators will consider exempting from protection under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act are in Monterey County, where last November voters passed Measure Z by an overwhelming margin. The new law couldn't be any clearer: It phases out wastewater disposal, bans fracking and prevents new wells from getting drilled. And yet unbelievably, the oil industry and regulators are now working together to undermine this law.

    This outrageous move would let the oil industry further contaminate an underground water source with dangerous chemicals. This is a blatant disregard of the will of the people.

    Now is the time to enforce Monterey County's fracking and wastewater-injection ban and protect our water from becoming a toxic garbage dump for this greedy industry.

    This shouldn't happen in Monterey County; this shouldn't happen anywhere. We know that there are many similar applications across the state. If the EPA approves these exemptions, scores of precious aquifers will be permanently contaminated.

    Since Trump's EPA won't be anything other than a rubberstamp for these applications, it's crucial that we demand that state regulators protect our water.  

    Act now to urge your state legislators and Governor Brown to hold regulators accountable and deny Big Oil's application to pollute.

  • Save the Santa Clara River Valley From Development
    Santa Clara River

    Names like "Landmark Village" and "Mission Village" conjure pictures of quaint rural communities -- not a combined new city of 5,500 houses plus 2.5 million square feet of commercial buildings crammed onto coastal wildlife habitat.

    Yet that's exactly what Los Angeles County is proposing for the never-ending zombie project known as Newhall Ranch. These "villages" will destroy more than 290 acres of floodplain of the last free-flowing river in Southern California -- the Santa Clara River.

    In creating a new city of at least 10,000 people, this development would also eat away at already-diminishing habitat for some of the region's most iconic rare plants and animals, including the unarmored threespine stickleback, a rare fish, and two rare birds, the least Bell's vireo and California condor. And while Newhall is promising "net zero" greenhouse gas emissions, don't bet on it. The company's plan relies heavily on purchasing carbon credits from potentially dubious sources.

    Using the form on this page, tell Los Angeles County to reject plans, once again, for Newhall Ranch and focus on protecting the Santa Clara River.

  • Let Condors Soar in Redwood National Park
    California condor

    Exciting news: The National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Yurok tribe are working on a plan to restore California condors to Redwood National Park in Yurok ancestral territory. North America's largest bird was near extinction just decades ago, with only 22 individuals left in the wild. But today there are more than 400 condors flying high, and we have a chance to help restore them to their historic range.

    Condors haven't soared in the Pacific Northwest in more than a century. And so returning the birds to northern California will restore a missing piece of the redwood forest's web of life and contribute significantly to the long-term survival of the species.

    The Yurok tribe is spearheading the reintroduction effort because of the cultural significance of the condor in their traditions. The Yurok believe the condor was among the first peoples of the world, and it now serves as a symbol of the effort to preserve their culture.

    Please join us in supporting this exciting plan and urge the agencies involved to make sure that the birds are safe in their new homes from lead poisoning, the main roadblock to condor recovery.

  • Speak Up for California Wolves
    Wolf OR-25

    Although California wolves are protected as an endangered species under federal and state law, they’re at risk of accidental killing due to hunting and trapping of other species in their habitat.

    Please join the Center for Biological Diversity in urging wildlife officials to ban these practices in wolf territory in California.

    Since 2011, 11 wolves have been confirmed in northern California: pioneering wolf OR-7, the seven-member Shasta wolf family, the newly confirmed Lassen pair, and lone wolf OR-25, who occasionally visits from Oregon. But a significant threat to wolf recovery in California is a state law allowing unlimited hunting of coyotes in areas that have been designated by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife as occupied or potential wolf territory. This creates the risk that a wolf might be mistaken for a coyote and shot, especially at night when visibility is low. In some circumstances state law also allows the use of lethal traps and snares to capture other species, but a wolf could just as easily fall victim to this deadly gear.

    To address this the Center and Project Coyote filed an administrative petition last year with the commission seeking a ban on nighttime hunting and use of lethal traps in current and prospective wolf territory. Now we’re urging the commission to move quickly on this petition to prevent unintentional wolf killings.

    Using the form on this page, urge California Fish and Game Commission members to ban night hunting of coyotes and the use of lethal traps and snares in wolf habitat.

    This letter also includes a request that the commission raise trapping fees so that California’s trapping program, which isn't self-funding as required by law, no longer requires support from taxpayers who may not want their taxes going toward unlimited hunting and trapping of wildlife.

  • Protect Minnesota's Boundary Waters From Copper Mining
    Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

    The 1.1-million-acre Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness is America's most visited wilderness area. Located in the Rainy River watershed in northeastern Minnesota, it includes nearly 2,000 pristine lakes and more than 1,200 miles of canoe routes. It's also great for hiking, camping, skiing, dog sledding and ice fishing, and is home to magnificent wildlife like moose, Canada lynx and wolves. It's rich with prehistoric and historic American Indian settlements.

    Along with Voyageurs National Park and Quetico Provincial Park, the Boundary Waters is part of an international network of protected land and wilderness of well over 2 million acres.

    The mining company Twin Metals has been pursuing a massive copper mine within the Rainy River watershed, just upstream from the Boundary Waters. Fortunately the Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service have halted any new mine proposals in the Rainy River watershed for the next two years due to the severe risk of perpetual, toxic water pollution.

    These agencies are now considering extending the temporary ban into a 20-year ban and are taking public comment and analyzing the risks and environmental impacts of copper mining in the Rainy River watershed. Here's where you come in.

    Using the form on this page, please tell these agencies to protect the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness from sulfide-ore copper mining.

  • Maryland: Ban Fracking Once and for All
    Fracking rig

    In 2015 Maryland successfully passed a moratorium on fracking, effectively ridding the state of this toxic practice for a two-year period.    

    Since then important new studies have confirmed the worst -- that fracking poses unacceptable risks to our wildlife, environment and health, including increased rates of asthma and premature births. And nationwide, fracking has been shown to increase risks of earthquakes, threats to clean air and water, and greenhouse gas emissions -- which is why states like New York have banned it outright.    

    Despite this evidence of harm, Governor Hogan's administration recently released new rules that lay the groundwork for future fracking in Maryland, and Hogan has said he fully intends to move forward with drilling as soon as the two-year moratorium expires this October. That means lawmakers have 90 days to pass a law to prevent the destruction of fracking.

    Act now to urge your legislators to pass a permanent ban on fracking in Maryland. That's the only way we can truly protect ourselves and our environment.

    And save this date: On March 2 we and allies will march on Annapolis to demand our state legislators pass the fracking ban. Stay tuned for more from us soon.

  • Fight Trump's Nominee for Interior Secretary
    Ryan Zinke

    We need your help today to fight the nomination of Ryan Zinke for Trump's Interior secretary. Interior oversees the protection of more than 1,500 endangered species and more than 500 million acres of America's public lands.

    If Zinke acts as he did in Congress, untold harm will result to native wildlife and our lands. During his short time as a Montana representative, Zinke voted against endangered species protections 100 percent of the time. He has a particular dislike for wolves and voted for stripping life-saving federal protections from endangered wolves, including those in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region. (Remember, Zinke was the one who sent out that cartoonish Christmas card with a dead wolf and him holding a military rifle.)

    Zinke may not want to sell our public lands, but he voted to turn control of them over to the states, which would have a similar end result. He introduced a bill to end Obama's coal-leasing moratorium. He supports more oil and gas drilling on public lands. And he's for stripping the president's authority to designate national monuments.

    Please take a moment right now to call your senators and tell them to oppose Zinke's appointment. And note: Voice mailboxes in Washington, D.C., have reportedly been full, so find numbers for your senators' state offices here.

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to express my opposition to Ryan Zinke's nomination for Interior secretary. He's against protecting endangered species. He wants more coal mining and oil and gas drilling on our public lands. And he would end protections for wolves. We need a secretary who will stand up for imperiled wildlife, our lands and climate. I strongly urge you to oppose Zinke's confirmation. Thank you.

  • Wyoming: Help Stop This Anti-renewables Bill
    Wyoming wind farm

    Wyoming's energy future -- and your ability to choose renewable energy -- is in trouble.

    State Senator Larry Hicks recently introduced a bill that, if passed, would prohibit utilities from providing electricity from large-scale wind or solar by 2019, even if their customers want it or if it's the cheaper option. This would effectively stifle renewable energy growth and force you and your neighbors to keep paying for dirty fossil fuels. We can't let that happen.

    This bill would hurt Wyoming's climate, water and wildlife and could stop as many as 20,000 new and long-lasting jobs from coming to the state. It would prevent a reliable source of homegrown energy from thriving and helping the U.S. meet its energy independence goals.

    But you can do something to prevent this from happening. Urge your state representatives to vote no on this irresponsible, anti-renewables energy bill.

  • Stop Cruel Killing of Rays in Chesapeake Bay
    Cownose rays

    Each spring cownose rays migrate up the Atlantic Coast to Chesapeake Bay, seeking refuge for feeding and breeding. But what awaits them is unthinkably cruel: Gliding along the water's surface, these intelligent and gentle kite-shaped creatures make an easy target for bowfishers, who compete for prizes in gruesome killing contests.

    This blood sport must end. Rays are being shot, impaled with gaffs and even beaten to death with bats before getting tossed into dumpsters or the bay. Combined with fishing-net entanglements, these contests are causing serious harm to ray populations. Mothers produce just one pup a year.  

    Please ask your state legislators to cosponsor bills H.B. 211 and S.B. 268, which will ban the contests in Maryland once and for all.

    And if you can, come to a public hearing on Jan. 31 at 1 p.m. at the State House in Annapolis. Your voice is needed to support the new bills that will end these contests.

  • Help Save Oregon's Elliott State Forest
    Elliott State Forest

    With towering old trees and excellent habitat for endangered coho salmon, marbled murrelets and spotted owls, the Elliott State Forest is a priceless gem owned by all Oregonians. But whether you know its beauty already or hope to visit someday, now is the time to act if we're going to preserve this special place: The Elliott could be sold as soon as Feb. 14 when the Department of State Lands next meets.

    Headed by Governor Kate Brown, the department held an auction on Dec. 13 and received a single bid from a timber company. But fortunately the department decided to delay acceptance of this bid to consider an option for keeping at least part of the Elliott in public hands.

    There are three things you can do to help save this forest:

    1) Join us in Salem for a day of lobbying on behalf of the Elliott on Feb. 23 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. You'll have a chance to meet with your elected officials and talk to them face to face about why you love the Elliott and why it deserves protection. Transportation will be provided from Portland, and various carpools will be forming throughout the state. Free lunch and a free T-shirt and training will also be provided at the start of the day. RSVP here.

    2) Whether or not you can attend the lobby day, use the form on this page to send a letter to the state land board and tell them you want the Elliott to remain protected and in public hands.

    3) Call the members of the land board and tell them that you don't want to see the Elliott sold to a private timber company. Here are the numbers to call: Gov. Kate Brown (503) 378-4582, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson (503) 986-1523, and State Treasurer Tobias Read (503) 378-4329.

  • Keep Fracking Out of the Wayne National Forest
    Wayne National Forest

    This past December the Bureau of Land Management auctioned hundreds of acres in southeast Ohio's Wayne National Forest to oil and gas developers, opening up these beautiful public lands to large-scale fracking for the very first time. The Center for Biological Diversity and local groups are actively working to invalidate this lease sale, but in the meantime the BLM and U.S. Forest Service already plan to auction another 1,100 acres in March in the Wayne's Marietta Unit, near the Ohio River and its tributaries.

    Please join us in sending a strong message to these agencies that our public lands are not sacrifice zones. What plays out in Ohio could have huge implications for surrounding states.

    If fracking is allowed in the Wayne, it will industrialize one of the few public forests in Ohio and threaten precious water supplies -- including the Ohio River, a drinking water source for millions of people. Fracking also endangers our climate and will degrade habitat for imperiled species like the Indiana bat, which is already struggling against habitat loss, white-nose syndrome and climate change.

    Act now to urge the BLM and Forest Service to cancel the March lease auction and end new oil and gas leasing in the Wayne. Fracking has no place in our public forests.

  • Tell Congress: Don't Mess With Wolf Recovery
    Gray wolf

    U.S. Senators Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) and Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) recently introduced a bill to strip federal protection from wolves in Wyoming, Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin. This bill is an ugly political ploy that will result in the deaths of thousands of wolves and do serious damage to one of the America's most important endangered species success stories.

    In response to lawsuits from the Center and allies, federal judges overturned a series of bad decisions to prematurely remove Endangered Species Act protection from wolves. But with language explicitly preventing further judicial review, the new bill would reverse these court orders, end federal wolf protections, and undermine the basic rule of law and the rights of citizens to challenge illegal government actions wherever they occur.

    That means that such cruel hunting methods as steel-jaw leghold traps, strangulation snares and even packs of dogs could be unleashed on wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region.

    Tell your representatives in Congress that you won't stand for it. Urge them to vote no on H.R. 424 and S. 164 and let science and law govern wolf recovery, not politics.

  • Demand a Stop to Attacks on Women and Wildlife
    Protester

    Donald Trump's first executive action after the historic Women's March was to reinstate the global gag rule, restricting access to reproductive healthcare and putting women's lives at risk. This response to the millions who marched for women's rights, equality and the environment sends a clear message that Donald Trump won't hesitate to pass policies that harm women, people of color and the planet.

    Congress can overturn the global gag rule, which prohibits international organizations from receiving funding if they participate in any abortion-related activity. But as soon as the current session of Congress convened Jan. 3, it began attacking women's rights and the environment. We need to stand together and keep the momentum of the Women's March going by demanding our representatives protect women's rights and reproductive freedom.

    Anti-choice Republicans are trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act and affordable access to birth control for millions of women, defund Planned Parenthood's reproductive health services, and pass a 6-week abortion ban to effectively create a federal ban on abortion. And now that Trump is in office, the stakes are even higher.

    Not only is reproductive freedom a basic human right, it is also inextricably linked to the preservation of wildlife and wild places. A woman's ability to access healthcare and prevent unplanned pregnancy is critical to reducing the pressure of human population on endangered species and fighting the effects of climate change.

    Using the form on this page, email your representatives to demand that they block any attempt to roll back access to reproductive healthcare.

    Center for Biological Diversity staff members joined hundreds of thousands this weekend in the Women's March on Washington. It was thrilling to see longtime activists as well as those who have never marched before rise together against Trump's dangerously racist, intolerant, anti-woman, anti-environmental agenda.

    We witnessed this same solidarity and commitment to action on our #Earth2Trump Roadshow of resistance, where every venue from coast to coast was filled to capacity. And we’ll need to maintain this momentum to protect the rights and values threatened by the new administration.

    In response to Donald Trump's first 100 days in office, the Center has created a 100-day plan outlining priorities, goals and methods. We're opposing Trump's attacks on our environment and values at every turn -- but we need your help. Start today by telling your representatives in no uncertain terms to protect women's rights.

  • Don't Let Trump's Climate Denier Run the EPA
    Scott Pruitt

    On Jan. 18 the Senate Environmental and Public Works Committee held its nomination hearing for Trump's pick for EPA administrator -- and the choice could hardly be worse. As Oklahoma's attorney general, Scott Pruitt took almost $350,000 in campaign contributions from the fossil fuel industry. In return he regularly sided with corporate polluters at the expense of his constituents.   

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Pruitt's appointment. And note: Voice mailboxes in Washington, D.C., have reportedly been full, so find numbers for your senators' state offices here.

    We can't let a climate denier run the EPA. Putting Pruitt in charge of the very agency he wants to dismantle will mean huge rollbacks to protections for our air, land and water.

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to oppose Scott Pruitt's nomination for EPA administrator. We can't allow someone who wants to dismantle the EPA to take control of it. Clean air and water belong to us all, and we must defend them from corporate polluters.

    I strongly urge you to oppose Pruitt's confirmation. Thank you.

  • Keep California's Rivers Clean and Clear of Mining
    Coho salmon

    State officials are considering opening up California's rivers to a reckless form of river mining known as suction dredging. We need your help in urging the state to permanently outlaw this dangerous and polluting hobby. In 2009 California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger enacted a moratorium on the practice -- and three years later Gov. Jerry Brown affirmed it. It's time to end this destructive hobby for good.

    Suction dredging -- which mines for gold using machines that suck up gravel and sand from river bottoms -- can turn a pristine mountain stream into a murky ditch that's unfit for people to swim in and for amphibians and fish to live in. It can also pollute rivers by stirring up toxic mercury.

    Suction dredge mining is a net loss for Californians: For a few flecks of gold, it destroys our water quality, harms endangered wildlife like coho salmon and red-legged frogs, and turns peaceful waterways into noisy mining sites.

    Urge the State Water Resources Control Board to ban suction dredging and protect wildlife habitat, water supplies and quiet river recreation.

  • Speak Up for Southern African Leopards
    South African leopard

    All leopards are at risk of extinction because of habitat and prey loss, poaching, human conflict and trophy hunting -- but not all leopards have the same protection under the Endangered Species Act. Southern African leopards, which range from South Africa to Kenya and Gabon, are protected as a threatened species only, while all other leopards in Africa and Asia are considered endangered.

    Let's work together to win the strongest protection available for these overlooked cats.

    In southern Africa, where leopards are currently classified as threatened, populations have declined by more than 30 percent over the past 25 years. Leopards are losing their prey to snares set to catch bushmeat and their habitat to expanding human populations. As humans and leopards come in closer contact, conflict erupts -- and the cats tend to lose. Leopards are killed not only in retaliation, but also for sport or their beautiful spotted fur.

    Endangered status would offer more protections to leopards in southern Africa and send a signal that the United States cares about leopard conservation worldwide. That's why, in the summer of 2016, the Center for Biological Diversity along with the Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society International, International Fund for Animal Welfare, and the Fund for Animals petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect all leopards as endangered. In a promising turn of events, the Service has acknowledged this may be necessary.

    Now the Service needs to hear from you. Take action today to tell the feds to give southern African leopards the fullest protections possible.

  • Say No to Trump's Dangerous Pick for Attorney General
    Jeff Sessions

    We need your help right now to stop Congress from approving former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as U.S. secretary of state.

    Handing control of the State Department to the man who's been running the world's largest oil company for the past decade would unleash more devastating fossil fuel extraction around the world -- dooming our climate, lands and water to a hellish future as Tillerson uses a government institution to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people.

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Tillerson's appointment. To get their phone numbers, enter your ZIP code into the box on this page and click "Submit."

    Trump's nomination of Tillerson is one of the worst in U.S. history. Over the past 10 years, with Tillerson at its helm, Exxon has used its enormous power to ruthlessly push for more oil and gas extraction, no matter the environmental and human costs. Tillerson hid Exxon's own research documenting the grave danger of global warming while funding right-wing think tanks to deny its existence.

    As the cabinet member charged with implementing the president's foreign policy, the secretary of state will decide the fate of both the Keystone XL pipeline and the Paris Climate Agreement.

    Please take just a few minutes to call your senators now. And if you don't get a staffer on the line, be sure to leave a voicemail. (Note: If the mailbox is full, try again later. Sending an email is also great.)

    Here's a sample script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to stop Rex Tillerson's confirmation as secretary of state. It's totally unacceptable to turn the State Department over to the former CEO of ExxonMobil to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people. With Tillerson in charge, oil industry profits would take priority over protecting our climate, and human rights would be cast aside.

    I strongly urge you to oppose his confirmation. Thank you.

  • Say No to Trump's Dangerous Pick for Attorney General
    Jeff Sessions

    On Jan. 10 the Senate Judiciary Committee held its nomination hearing for one of Trump's most dangerous cabinet picks. U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) has a disastrous record of voting against environmental protections and civil rights. And yet he would be responsible for enforcing and upholding our nation's laws, including the Endangered Species Act and Clean Air Act, and prosecuting the most egregious crimes committed by corporate polluters.  

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Sessions' appointment. And note: Voice mailboxes in Washington, D.C., have reportedly been full, so find numbers for your senators' state offices here.

    Throughout his career as Alabama's attorney general and as a U.S. attorney under President Reagan, Sessions has a history of making racist comments, denying climate change and voting against almost every piece of environmental legislation since 1997. Let's make sure he isn't appointed to this crucial post, meant for leaders who will defend our environment and civil rights.

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to stop Jeff Sessions' confirmation as attorney general. Mr. Sessions has consistently opposed many of the federal laws he will be responsible for enforcing, and he has a disastrous record on environmental and civil rights. The American public does not want him in office; please listen to your constituents.

    I strongly urge you to oppose his confirmation. Thank you.

  • Halt Trump's Disastrous Nomination of Exxon CEO
    Rex Tillerson

    We need your help right now to stop Congress from approving former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as U.S. secretary of state.

    Handing over control of the State Department to the man who's been running the world's largest oil company for the past decade would unleash more devastating fossil fuel extraction around the world -- dooming our climate, lands and water to a hellish future as Tillerson uses a government institution to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people.

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Tillerson's appointment. And note: Voice mailboxes in Washington, D.C., have reportedly been full, so find numbers for your senators' state offices here.

    Trump's nomination of Tillerson is one of the worst in U.S. history. Over the past 10 years, with Tillerson at its helm, Exxon has used its enormous power to ruthlessly push for more oil and gas extraction, no matter the environmental and human costs. Tillerson hid Exxon's own research documenting the grave danger of global warming while funding right-wing think tanks to deny its existence.

    As the cabinet member charged with implementing the president's foreign policy, the secretary of state will decide the fate of both the Keystone XL pipeline and the Paris Climate Agreement. Please take just a few minutes to call your senators now. 

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to stop Rex Tillerson's confirmation as secretary of state. It's totally unacceptable to turn the State Department over to the former CEO of ExxonMobil to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people. With Tillerson in charge, oil industry profits would take priority over protecting our climate, and human rights would be cast aside.

    I strongly urge you to oppose his confirmation. Thank you.

  • Send Donald Trump a Letter
    Donald Trump

    Something about Trump.

  • Petition (Full Banner)
    Gray wolf

    I pledge to stand in resistance to Donald Trump's assault on America's clean air, clean water, climate, wildlife, civil rights, reproductive rights, gender and racial equality, and freedom of speech and religion.

    I pledge to stand in solidarity with those threatened by violence and intimidation because of who they are, what they believe or their opposition to Trump's dangerous agenda.

    Donald Trump is an unprecedented threat to our nation's democracy, health and environment. He must not be allowed to dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency, gut the Clean Air and Endangered Species acts, raid our public lands, eliminate regulations protecting poor communities from pollution, deport millions of people, take away our reproductive freedom, or force millions to live in fear.

    I pledge to resist Trump through action.

    I pledge to speak out, make phone calls, sign petitions, join rallies, support conservation and civil rights groups, educate my family and friends, and keep a compassionate, loving heart while fighting fiercely for the values I cherish most.

  • Letter (With Full Banner)
    Gray wolf

    They're at it again. Attached to this year's "Department of Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill" (the annual spending bill for agencies like the EPA and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) are several disastrous riders that have nothing to do with our nation's budget and are a shameful attempt to undermine science, democracy and environmental laws. Republicans in Congress are trying to sneak these riders through -- and we need your help to make sure that doesn't happen.

    Please call your representatives and tell them to vote no on this bill until these riders are removed. If these riders go through, gray wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region will lose federal protections, greater sage grouse will never get the protection they need, and endangered salmon and Delta smelt may never get a chance to thrive in the wild.

    You can leave your message with the receptionist or at the office's voicemail.

  • Halt Trump's Disastrous Nomination of Exxon CEO
    Rex Tillerson

    We need your help right now to stop Congress from approving former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as U.S. secretary of state.

    Handing control of the State Department to the man who's been running the world's largest oil company for the past decade would unleash more devastating fossil fuel extraction around the world -- dooming our climate, lands and water to a hellish future as Tillerson uses a government institution to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people.

    Please take a moment to call your senators and tell them to oppose Tillerson's appointment. To get their phone numbers, enter your ZIP code into the box on this page and click "Submit."

    Trump's nomination of Tillerson is one of the worst in U.S. history. Over the past 10 years, with Tillerson at its helm, Exxon has used its enormous power to ruthlessly push for more oil and gas extraction, no matter the environmental and human costs. Tillerson hid Exxon's own research documenting the grave danger of global warming while funding right-wing think tanks to deny its existence.

    As the cabinet member charged with implementing the president's foreign policy, the secretary of state will decide the fate of both the Keystone XL pipeline and the Paris Climate Agreement.

    Please take just a few minutes to call your senators now. And if you don't get a staffer on the line, be sure to leave a voicemail. (Note: If the mailbox is full, try again later. Sending an email is also great.)

    Here's a sample script.

    Hi, my name is ____ , and I'm from [City, State]. I'm calling to ask you to do everything in your power to stop Rex Tillerson's confirmation as secretary of state. It's totally unacceptable to turn the State Department over to the former CEO of ExxonMobil to advance the interests of the oil industry rather than the American people. With Tillerson in charge, oil industry profits would take priority over protecting our climate, and human rights would be cast aside.

    I strongly urge you to oppose his confirmation. Thank you.

  • Help Save Oregon's Elliott State Forest
    Elliott State Forest

    With its old-growth forests and streams, the 83,000-acre Elliott State Forest in Oregon's Coast Range provides critical habitat for marbled murrelets, spotted owls, Oregon Coast coho and other salmon. Right now the Elliott belongs to all Oregonians -- but we may lose it unless we take action.

    On Dec. 13 Governor Kate Brown and the other two members of the land board, Ted Wheeler and Jeanne Atkins, will decide whether or not to sell the Elliott to the highest bidder for logging. If the board sells the Elliott, this cherished and stately coastal rainforest will be turned into a giant clearcut.

    Several years ago conservation groups sued Oregon to stop the state from logging more of the Elliott's old forests needed by the marbled murrelet and so many other species for their survival. The state agreed to stop logging forests used by the murrelet -- but then turned around and put the forest up for sale.

    There are three things you can do right now to express your opposition to the sale of the Elliot: Send a letter to Gov. Brown and the other members of the land board, follow up with phone calls, and attend a rally at the Dec. 13 meeting of the board. If you can take even just one of these actions, great. If you can do two or more, even better.

    Send a Letter to Land Board Members

    Using the form on this page, send Gov. Brown and the other members of the land board a letter requesting they keep the Elliott in public hands.

    Follow Up With Calls

    Before Dec. 13, call the members of the land board and tell them that you don't want to see the 83,000-acre Elliott State Forest sold to a private timber company. Your statement can be as simple as that, or you can use additional details from our letter on this page. Here are the phone numbers to call:

    Gov. Kate Brown: (503) 378-4582
    Ted Wheeler: (503) 378-4329
    Jeanne Atkins: (503) 986-1523

    Attend a Rally Dec. 13

    Please join public lands advocates from across Oregon for a rally urging our state leaders to go back to the drawing board and find a solution for the Elliott that keeps it permanently in public ownership and protects its natural resources. The rally takes place just prior to the land board meeting; if you can, plan to stay after the rally for the meeting.

    When: Dec. 13, 9 a.m.
    Where: Keizer Community Center, 930 Chemawa Rd. NE, Keizer

    If you're on Facebook, join the event.

    Thank you for standing up for Elliott State Forest.

  • Protect Alameda County's Water From Toxic Oil Waste
    Oil derrick

    The next aquifer that California state oil regulators will consider exempting from protection under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act -- the Greenville Sands -- lies adjacent to the city of Livermore in Alameda County.

    We know that there are many similar applications across California. Regulators are in the process of rubber-stamping operations like this one and attempting to get aquifers exempted from the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. To do so the state must first approve an application, then send it to the EPA for a final stamp. That's right -- in the middle of a drought, the industry and state want to destroy scores of aquifers that may affect thousands of people.

    If approved, exemptions would allow the oil industry to contaminate underground water sources with dangerous chemicals -- an unthinkable move even if California weren't in the midst of a devastating drought.

    This shouldn't happen in Alameda County; this shouldn't happen anywhere. Now is the time to build off Alameda County's fracking ban and protect our water from becoming a garbage dump for this toxic, greedy industry. With the possibility of a gutted EPA under Trump, California must take charge and ensure its water is protected.

    Act now to urge your state legislators to hold regulators accountable and deny Big Oil's application to pollute.

  • Pledge of Resistance to Donald Trump's Assault on America's Environment, Democracy and Civil Rights
    The Fight Is On.

    I pledge to stand in resistance to Donald Trump's assault on America's clean air, clean water, climate, wildlife, civil rights, reproductive rights, gender and racial equality, and freedom of speech and religion.
    Read More  

  • Last Chance to Tell Obama: Stop Coal Mining in Roadless Forests
    Bulldozer

    In western Colorado, amid some of our country's most beautiful roadless forests, there are plans afoot for destructive coal mining -- but we have a last chance to stop it. Help shut down Arch Coal's bid to destroy public lands for profit and send a clear message to the incoming Trump administration about where we stand.

    Urge President Obama to uphold protections for this roadless area.

    Right now these public lands are protected by the Colorado Roadless Rule. But under a loophole the U.S. Forest Service is now proposing, 65 miles of new roads across 19,000 acres of wild forest would be bulldozed. A beautiful place could disappear -- a place that's home to bears, elk, goshawks and lynx.

    The climate costs attached to this plan are also astounding: The Forest Service's own analysis concludes it could add millions of tons of carbon dioxide pollution to our atmosphere and cause as much as $3.4 billion in damage to the world's economy and environment.

    Act now to urge President Obama to protect his climate legacy and our wildlands by keeping Colorado roadless forests closed to coal mining.

  • Wisconsin: Your Voice Is Needed for Wolves
    Gray wolf

    Attached to this year's 'Department of Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill' (the annual spending bill that funds agencies like the EPA and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) is a disastrous provision that would strip federal protections from wolves in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan and Wyoming.

    Republicans have been trying to sneak this provision through for years, and now, caving in to the pressure of the anti-wildlife voices, Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) has publicly offered her support. We can't let it happen. Riders like this undermine science, democracy and our environmental laws -- and if this one goes through, hunters and industry will declare open season on wolves.

    If you're from Wisconsin, please call Senator Baldwin toll-free at (800) 247-5645 and urge her to withdraw her support from this backhanded legislation.

    You can leave your message with the receptionist or at the office's voicemail.

    Here's a sample call script.

    Hi, my name is ______, and I'm a Wisconsin resident who lives in ______.  I'm calling to express my disappointment with Senator Baldwin's recent letter to the U.S. Senate supporting the removal of protections for Great Lakes wolves. The rider that seeks to delist wolves in this year's appropriations bill has nothing to do with our nation's budget and is a shameful attempt to undermine science, democracy and environmental laws.

    Please stay strong and protect our wildlife -- now is not the time to back down to the extreme voices in Congress. Thank you.

  • Pledge of Resistance to Donald Trump's Assault on America's Environment, Democracy and Civil Rights
    The Fight Is On.

    I pledge to stand in resistance to Donald Trump's assault on America's clean air, clean water, climate, wildlife, civil rights, reproductive rights, gender and racial equality, and freedom of speech and religion.
    Read More  

  • Pledge of Resistance to Donald Trump's Assault on America's Environment, Democracy and Civil Rights
    The Fight Is On.

    I pledge to stand in resistance to Donald Trump's assault on America's clean air, clean water, climate, wildlife, civil rights, reproductive rights, gender and racial equality, and freedom of speech and religion.
    Read More  

  • End the Harvest of New York's Terrapins
    Diamondback terrapin

    With speckled skin and elaborately patterned shells, diamondback terrapins are gorgeous creatures. They're also hard workers who keep the balance along our coasts -- by eating snails that would otherwise devour salt-marsh grasses and lead to ecosystem collapse.

    Right now these turtles face a host of serious threats, from fishing-gear entanglement to car strikes and overcollection. But luckily for New York's terrapins, the state is considering a solution that will give them a chance to recover: a full closure of the harvesting season. 

    Currently any person who holds a diamondback terrapin license can take them in unlimited numbers during a nine-month open season. This is terrible policy, given that scientists have repeatedly shown that even moderate levels of collection can send populations into a crash.

    Take action below -- tell New York's wildlife officials to follow the lead of other East Coast states and end the harvest as soon as possible.

  • Help Save California's Flat-tailed Horned Lizards
    Flat-tailed horned lizard

    In late 2014 the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned the California Fish and Game Commission to protect flat-tailed horned lizards -- and the commission agreed to consider these vanishing creatures for state Endangered Species Act protection.

    Unfortunately agency staff subsequently recommended no protection for these lizards based on a review that was deeply flawed.

    In a formal recommendation to the commission, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife ignored extensive habitat degradation occurring in many designated "conservation areas" and wrongly concluded that these lizards don't need the protection of California's laws. The agency is assuming that voluntary actions by federal agencies will suffice -- but that's a very bad assumption in the face of a Trump administration.

    The commissioners will make their final decision on Dec. 8, which is why we need your help. Urge them to do the right thing and protect these lizards now.

  • Protect Gulf Whales and Dolphins From Trump
    Dolphins

    With Trump's energy policy promising to lead to a rapid expansion of the U.S. fossil fuel industry, we must speak up quickly and loudly to protect the Gulf of Mexico's whales and dolphins from the harm they suffer from seismic surveys.

    Seismic exploration surveys use arrays of high-powered airguns to search for oil. The sonic blasts from these guns, which can exceed 250 decibels and be heard for miles, can permanently deafen marine mammals -- and a deaf whale is a dead whale. The blasts also disturb essential behaviors such as feeding and breeding, mask communications between individual animals, and reduce catch rates of commercial fish.

    As a result of a settlement secured by the Center and allies, the federal government recently disclosed previously hidden data about the harmful impacts of offshore oil and gas surveys on marine mammals. The news is alarming: Over the course of the next 10 years, whales and dolphins will be injured and harassed by oil surveys up to 31.9 million times.

    Marine mammals have already suffered from inadequate regulation of offshore oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Mexico. For decades seismic surveys have harmed marine mammals in violation of environmental laws. These whales and dolphins have also suffered habitat loss and injuries from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Their populations cannot survive business as usual.

    Take action now: Call on the federal government to protect the Gulf's marine mammals from being bombarded by deafening oil and gas seismic surveys.

  • Pledge to Resist Donald Trump's Assault on America's Environment, Democracy and Civil Rights
    The Fight Is On.

    I pledge to stand in resistance to Donald Trump's assault on America's clean air, clean water, climate, wildlife, civil rights, reproductive rights, gender and racial equality, and freedom of speech and religion.
    Read More  

  • Don't Let Congress Turn Our Forests Into Fuel
    Cut trees being chipped for biomass

    The timber industry wants Congress to change the laws of physics by declaring that burning trees for energy is "carbon neutral" and won't harm the climate. At least three different anti-science proposals are under consideration during the lame-duck session now underway -- and we need you to speak out against them.

    Wood-burning power plants release even more carbon than coal or gas plants per megawatt-hour, so switching to wood actually increases immediate climate pollution. And even if all the trees we burn today are replaced by new trees -- which no one can guarantee -- it will take decades or longer for the carbon to be reabsorbed.

    But we don't have decades: We need to cut carbon to address the climate crisis right now, and one very good way to do that is simply to keep carbon in the forest and out of the atmosphere.

    For the past few years the EPA has been working with scientific experts to figure out how to account for carbon emissions from burning wood and other "biomass" in a scientifically credible way. The timber industry's riders would slam the door on this ongoing scientific process by requiring regulators to pretend that CO
    2 created by burning wood simply doesn't exist.

    Treating wood as carbon neutral would sanction and promote dirty, inefficient, high-carbon biomass energy in federal policy, undermining the gains we're poised to make under the Clean Power Plan, Paris Agreement and other climate policies. Instead of looking for more things to burn, we need to be developing and expanding actual zero-carbon options such as wind and solar.

    These anti-science riders also could lead to a ransacking of our forests. In Europe, where regulators ignore biomass carbon, huge power plants are already importing shiploads of wood pellets from the United States, made from clearcutting native southeastern forests. If the EPA follows suit, many more of our trees will fall, taking precious habitat and wild creatures with them.

    Help us stop this anti-science effort in its tracks. Ask President Obama and your representatives in Congress to oppose the timber industry's anti-science biomass riders.

  • Save Burrowing Owls From Eviction
    Burrowing owls

    As their name implies, burrowing owls need underground cover for survival. And yet, at the request of developers, California wildlife officials routinely allow owls to be evicted from their burrows. They call this practice "passive relocation," but there's nothing passive or humane about it.

    Biologists install one-way doors on burrows that allow the owls to exit but not return -- effectively evicting them without notice. State wildlife officials admit that owls are likely harmed, and even killed, as a result. 

    Burrowing owls have already been fully eliminated from a quarter of their former range in California due to habitat loss, eradication of burrowing rodents, and the practice of booting owls from construction sites.

    Tell the state's wildlife officials to stop the inhumane eviction of burrowing owls and work toward ensuring their safe future.

  • Stop GE Grass From Invading Oregon and Idaho
    Creeping bentgrass

    We've been here before. Almost 15 years ago, Scotts and Monsanto petitioned the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow the commercial sale of creeping bentgrass, genetically engineered to withstand the herbicide Roundup. But before the approval came through, they caused an environmental catastrophe that forced them to pull their petition.

    Despite the fact that they have been unable to contain this catastrophe, today Scotts and Monsanto are back with the same petition and request.

    What happened 15 years ago is that an invasive, herbicide-tolerant frankengrass designed for golf courses escaped its test environment and contaminated pristine Crooked River national grassland in Oregon. To this day the grass continues to spread across the Oregon and Idaho landscape. Despite a federal report indicating bentgrass would harm endangered species in Oregon, the USDA has just issued a new analysis stating it poses no threat to endangered species or the environment.

    This disingenuous analysis will allow the USDA to relinquish authority over the grass and let Scotts and Monsanto off the hook for cleaning up their mess. Deregulating GE bentgrass would absolve Scotts and Monsanto of the duty to mitigate the damage they've caused. Any "promises" they make to continue to help with the cleanup are not binding.

    Take action below -- tell the USDA it must deny the new request from Scotts and Monsanto and prevent GMO grass from contaminating wild lands and hurting endangered species in our states.

  • Tell BLM: Don't Treat Climate Protesters Like Criminals
    Keep It in the Ground

    As the movement to end fossil fuel leasing on public lands grows, the Bureau of Land Management is responding with increasingly desperate measures to avoid climate controversy.

    After moving fossil fuel auctions online to dodge growing "Keep It in the Ground" protests, the agency has now proposed a new rule in Colorado that would treat climate activists like criminals. The rule would grant the agency excessive discretion to bar some forms of speech and assembly precisely when we need them most.

    While the BLM should be able to protect the safety of its employees and anyone who attends its hearings, parts of this rule give the agency too much latitude to silence peaceful opposition.

    Urge the BLM to strike these controversial sections from its proposed rule due to the threats they pose to our free speech and ability to act on climate change.

  • Stop This Massive Desert Tortoise Translocation
    Desert tortoise

    The U.S. Marine Corps' combat center near Twentynine Palms, Calif., is expanding an additional 260 square miles in the Mojave Desert. But the collateral damage that will result from the current plan is astounding: The Marines want to physically move up to 3,200 desert tortoises, with only half expected to survive.

    Last year, after the Center for Biological Diversity opposed this plan, the Marine Corps and Bureau of Land Management released a supplemental environmental impact statement and tortoise relocation plan. But this new document still doesn't look at any alternative that would leave more tortoises in their homes, designate new habitat, or limit damage.

    We know another way is feasible because, earlier this year, the Marines used the area for training and drove only on existing roads, thereby fulfilling their mission while minimizing harm to tortoises.
     
    Join us in urging the Marines to rethink their strategy and find a solution to this problem.

  • Don't Hang Joshua Tree Out to Dry
    Joshua tree

    Southern California's Joshua Tree National Park is home to an incredible cast of desert plants and animals. But the area's precious groundwater, which makes life possible, is at serious risk.

    The park and surrounding public lands are threatened by a massive drawdown of ancient groundwater by the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Project. Developers plan to siphon more than 9 billion gallons from the aquifer for storage in open-air reservoirs formed from old mine pits. The idea is to produce electricity when the water runs from the higher pit into the lower pit, but the reality is that the plan will use even more energy to pump the water back upward.

    The loss of water to evaporation would also be significant, and the groundwater loss will add to stresses from climate change and drought.

    We still have a chance of stopping this project. Developers need a right-of-way permit to build a water pipeline and electric transmission line on Bureau of Land Management lands. Join us in urging the agency to reject this permit and defend the desert's most precious resource.

  • End Unlimited Harvest of Louisiana's Turtles
    Red-eared slider

    Louisiana is a hotspot for freshwater turtles, but these shelled reptiles are at great risk of disappearing. Current state law allows commercial trappers to capture 20 types of turtles from the wild in unlimited numbers. Add this threat to vehicle strikes, pollution and habitat loss, and you've got a recipe for extinction.

    Scientists agree that even moderate levels of commercial harvest can lead to population crashes. And with many species like common snapping turtles and spiny softshells being sold domestically and abroad, the incentive is strong for trappers to capture turtles until none can be found.

    That's why the Center for Biological Diversity and Gulf Restoration Network have asked the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries to end the commercial harvest. The Center's advocacy has prompted states across the country to restrict turtle trapping for the sake of these struggling creatures.

    Help give Louisiana's turtles a fighting chance. Tell state officials you support a commercial trapping ban.

  • Give Bluefin Tuna Endangered Species Protection
    Bluefin tuna

    Pacific bluefin tuna populations have sunk to dangerously low levels, declining to just 3 percent of their historical numbers. And most -- possibly more than 98 percent -- of these tuna that are caught and processed are immature juveniles that have never reproduced. In other words, young bluefin tuna aren't getting the chance to grow up to be parents. It's an ecological emergency and a recipe for extinction.

    The international commissions that set catch levels for Pacific bluefin tuna have failed to set the necessary limits to allow populations to recover. Earlier this month the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission met to discuss Pacific bluefin -- and once again chose business as usual, which means that rampant overfishing continues.

    In response to the alarming decline of the species, the National Marine Fisheries Service is considering whether to list bluefin tuna as an endangered species.

    But the Service must act quickly and boldly in the face of the inevitable industry backlash. Write to the agency to request a thorough scientific review -- the next step necessary to protect these magnificent fish under the Endangered Species Act.

  • Stop Zombie Development in Riverside County
    White-tailed kite

    In 2012 the Center and allies stopped a mega-development from being built right next to the San Jacinto Wildlife Area. But like a zombie, the project has returned from the dead: Riverside County is moving forward with an almost identical real-estate development in the same location.

    The Villages of Lakeview project, composed of up to 11,350 dwelling units and about 1.4 million square feet of commercial development, would be even more damaging than its vanquished predecessor. It would destroy an additional 94 acres of wildlife habitat adjacent to the San Jacinto Wildlife Area and the San Jacinto River floodplain, paving over habitat for raptors like white-tailed kites and imperiled birds like burrowing owls. With some of the highest-density housing planned right beside the refuge, the project would set up conflicts between people and wildlife. By building housing far from jobs and public transportation, it would lead to unprecedented increases in traffic and air pollution.

    Building a sprawling city far from existing infrastructure is outdated thinking that has no place in this time of climate change. This project will not only harm wildlife and quality of life, but put California's climate change goals further out of reach. We have to stop it.

    Tell the Riverside County Planning Department to shelve this bad project for good.

  • Colorado's Bears and Lions Need Your Help
    Mountain lion

    Colorado Parks and Wildlife has proposed a plan to kill mountain lions and black bears in the Piceance Basin over a three-year period under the guise of recovering mule deer herds.

    But the science is clear: Habitat loss and poor food quality are what's impacting deer recovery, not predation. The Piceance Basin in northwest Colorado has been hammered by oil and gas drilling for years, resulting in degraded habitat for wildlife. Because mule deer are limited by their food resources, this habitat loss is significant.

    Despite this, agency officials have put together a "Predator Management Plan" to test a theory that removing carnivores from the landscape will magically boost deer numbers. Spoiler alert: It won't. This plan completely ignores science, which shows that killing native carnivores to increase deer populations is unlikely to work -- especially here, where habitat loss and inadequate nutrition have already been proven the limiting factors.

    In mid-December the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission will meet to determine whether to approve the agency's plan and move forward with a kill order. Urge the commissioners to review the science, reject the plan and spare our wildlife.

  • Tell Obama: Put Solar Panels on Federal Buildings
    Federal building

    A recent study published in Nature shows that without fundamental changes to how we get and use energy, the United States is on track to miss its emissions-reduction target under the Paris Climate Agreement.

    Fortunately there's huge untapped potential for distributed-solar energy: Federal agencies own or lease 360,000 buildings with a total footprint of over 1.2 billion square feet. If solar were installed on all these rooftops, federal buildings could generate more than 24 billion kilowatt hours of solar energy annually -- enough to power more than 1.8 million American homes and reduce carbon emissions by 16.8 million metric tons annually.

    A clean, wildlife-friendly energy economy is technically and economically within our reach, but requires visionary leadership and political will.

    Tell President Obama to issue an Executive Order requiring the federal government to put solar panels on all federal buildings or, for incompatible buildings, to obtain energy from local distributed-solar energy.

  • Oregon: Say No to a Massive New Factory Farm
    Dairy cows

    Oregon officials are considering whether to permit a new factory farm in the northeast's Umatilla River Basin, and we need your help to stop this harmful project.

    Let's be real: There's nothing remotely sustainable about 30,000 dairy cows stuffed into a concentrated feedlot. If approved the quaintly named "Lost Valley Ranch" would transform the basin into a wasteland.

    Beyond the obvious water-quality concerns related to maintaining so many cows (which generates approximately as much excrement and urine as a medium-to-large city), the ranch developers intend to withdraw 890,000 gallons of water per day from the Lower Umatilla River. We can't let that happen. This basin supports an incredible range of wildlife including two kinds of fish -- bull trout and summer steelhead -- that are protected under the Endangered Species Act precisely because of threats including water withdrawal and diversions for agriculture, degraded water quality, and increased sedimentation.

    Take action below: Urge Oregon's officials to protect the state's water, public health and wildlife by denying the permit for this factory farm -- and if you can, personalize your letter.

  • Stop Climate Calamity on Colorado Public Lands
    Uncompahgre National Forest

    A scientific report released in October shows that meeting the Paris Agreement's climate targets ratified by President Obama will require no new fossil fuel development beyond what's already under production.

    But on our public lands -- including Bureau of Land Management lands in western Colorado's Uncompahgre region -- business as usual continues. The BLM wants to allow even more coal mining there while opening vast new areas to oil and gas fracking over coming decades.

    In fact, despite the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, every alternative in the BLM's new draft management plan would increase such emissions over baseline levels. And none of the alternatives would limit fossil fuel production in any way -- every alternative would allow more leasing, fracking and drilling for oil and gas.

    It's time for the BLM to bring forward public lands policies that align with rather than undermine our nation's critical climate goals. Take action below to tell the agency that we can't continue to do business as usual -- and to go back to the drawing board with its new draft management plan.

  • Protect Grand Canyon's Magnificent Watershed
    Greater Grand Canyon watershed

    The Grand Canyon is a breathtaking, awe-inspiring site visited by millions of people every year. The canyon is surrounded by public lands, where native wildlife roam through magnificent old pines and life-giving streams and springs feed the Colorado River and iconic Havasupai Falls. This magnificent landscape is also the cultural and spiritual home of many southwestern tribes.

    But the lands surrounding the majestic canyon remain unprotected and open to exploitation. Working with Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), local tribal nations have proposed the creation of the Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument to protect the surrounding 1.7-million-acre watershed from toxic uranium mining and destructive old-growth logging.

    Congress isn't likely to act in time, so we're urging President Obama to use his power under the Antiquities Act to forever protect these lands for future generations.

    Tell the president to leave a legacy we can all be proud of by designating the Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument.

  • Help Oregon Close a Loophole to Invasive Species
    Deballasting on the Columbia River

    The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is poised to do the right thing on aquatic invasive species -- but it needs your support to counter opposition from a stubborn shipping industry. 

    Ships use ballast water to maintain their balance. But when they discharge this water collected from ports around the world, they release invasive species that have hitched rides along the way -- up to 4,000 in a single tank. These invasives can change water chemistry and disrupt food webs. They can out-compete imperiled wildlife such as salmon and steelhead. And they can wreak economic havoc by clogging water intakes, locks and dams.

    While federal agencies currently require ships to treat ballast water prior to discharge, the low level of treatment isn't enough. Oregon DEQ has proposed a partial solution: rules that require ships at high risk of discharging invasives into freshwater ports to flush their ballast water out at sea

    Urge Oregon DEQ to stand up to the political pressure of the shipping industry and protect the state's waters and wildlife from avoidable harm.

  • Save These Ocean Beauties From Extinction
    Chambered nautilus

    A relative of squid and octopuses, the chambered nautilus is an ancient ocean mollusk that's survived five major mass extinctions. Despite this remarkable resilience, it's now rapidly disappearing to line trinket shelves and decorate walls.

    The colorful, fractal spiral shells of the nautilus have made these primeval creatures into red-hot commodities in the international shell trade.

    Fortunately, in response to a Center petition, the National Marine Fisheries Service has said that Endangered Species Act protection may be warranted for the nautilus. Our petition seeks to curb imports of nautilus shells and calls for the U.S. government to encourage the Philippines, Indonesia and other Indo-Pacific countries to enforce their environmental laws and stop the unsustainable harvest.

    Take action below -- urge the Fisheries Service to act quickly to protect these fascinating creatures that have graced our oceans for half a billion years.

  • Tell the National Park Service to Serve Earth-friendly Food
    Veggie burgers

    More than 23 million meals are served every year at national parks across the country, from Acadia to Yosemite. This makes the National Park Service one of the largest purchasers of food in the federal government, giving it the responsibility to serve meals that are good for people, wildlife and the environment.

    The Service took a step in the right direction when it created the Healthy Food Healthy Parks campaign in 2012. But its standards for food-service providers are already out of date and fail to do enough to protect our parks from the harm to the environment caused by meat production and food waste.

    Recent studies show that meat production is the single greatest threat to biodiversity and that we’ll be unable to meet international climate goals without reducing meat and dairy consumption. In addition, about 40 percent of food in the United States goes uneaten, which wastes all the natural resources that went into producing it.

    The National Park Service should be a leader in setting the standard for sustainable menus and food-waste reduction. Tell it to update its guidelines to serve less meat and more plant-based foods, and prevent food waste in the parks.

  • Speak Up Again for Iowa's Wild Turtles
    Common snapping turtle

    Threats like habitat destruction, pollution and trapping are causing alarming declines in freshwater turtle populations across the country.

    Fortunately, in response to public outcry and a 2009 petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources earlier this year recommended rules that would protect the state’s turtles from trapping during their nesting season as well as set daily quotas that limit how many turtles can be killed by trappers.

    Thanks in part to our supporters for voicing support for these recommendations, the agency has now turned them into formal proposals. Although Iowa should ultimately end commercial turtle trapping outright, season closures and daily bag limits are crucial first steps.

    Speak up for freshwater turtles -- tell state officials you support regulations to help protect Iowa's wild turtles from trapping.

  • End Cruel Trapping on Our Public Lands
    Fox

    Cruel and dangerous traps have no place on federal lands set aside for conservation and recreation, such as the millions of acres within our national wildlife refuges and national forests.

    Yet government trappers continue to target animals like wolves, coyotes and mountain lions, even though research shows that eradicating these ecologically essential predators to protect livestock is simply a bad idea. And commercial trappers are still allowed to use federal lands to kill foxes, beavers and other wildlife for their fur.

    Captured animals suffer excruciating pain for hours or even days before a trapper returns, and many die from dehydration, injuries or predation. These traps are also indiscriminate -- capable of seriously injuring people and pets if hidden along popular trails or waterways.

    Take action below -- urge your representative in Congress to cosponsor the Limiting Inhumane Federal Trapping for Public Safety Act (H.R. 5954, introduced by Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore.), which would at last help stop this unnecessary killing across a vast swath of federal lands.

  • Stand in Solidarity Against the Dakota Access Pipeline
    Dakota Access Pipeline protest

    We need you to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and more than 150 tribal nations opposing construction of the dangerous, unnecessary and monumentally disrespectful Dakota Access Oil Pipeline.

    Sign the letter below and we'll send it to President Obama and share it with tribal leaders fighting this pipeline.

    Water is life -- and in North Dakota the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is leading an inspiring and historic battle to protect it by stopping the Dakota Access pipeline.

    The pipeline would carry almost 19 million gallons of dirty oil per day from North Dakota to Illinois, slashing through traditional indigenous lands, fragile wildlife habitat, sacred sites and the Missouri River. Spills are inevitable, and the carbon costs to our climate unacceptable.

    Led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, a massive wave of grassroots opposition is building, with protests and civil disobedience temporarily halting plans. But construction is moving forward and scheduled to be completed soon.

    President Obama has the power to stop the bulldozers -- and he should. The Army Corps of Engineers rubber-stamped the Dakota Access pipeline this past July using a controversial fast-track permit that shielded cultural and environmental problems from public scrutiny.
     
    Please join us in standing with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Urge President Obama to rescind the Dakota Access pipeline permit and stop this project once and for all.

  • Darden letters
  • SalsaStaff 139269: Responsive action test
    Confluence

    Real-estate developers are seeking approval from the Navajo Nation Tribal Council to construct a resort at the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado rivers. This mega-development would be a permanent, disastrous blight on Grand Canyon -- and your help is needed to stop it.

    The proposed 420-acre development, named "Escalade," would include a hotel, restaurants, shops and a tramway. Many local and tribal communities have been fighting this proposal because it threatens to destroy the environment, their way of life, and cultural traditions.

    Tell Navajo Nation Tribal Council delegates that you oppose this development. Time is of the essence: Please take action below by Saturday, Sept. 3.

  • Stand with Tribal Communities: Say No to Grand Canyon Development
    Confluence

    Real-estate developers are seeking approval from the Navajo Nation Tribal Council to construct a resort at the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado rivers. This mega-development would be a permanent, disastrous blight on Grand Canyon -- and your help is needed to stop it.

    The proposed 420-acre development, named "Escalade," would include a hotel, restaurants, shops and a tramway. Many local and tribal communities have been fighting this proposal because it threatens to destroy the environment, their way of life, and cultural traditions.

    Tell Navajo Nation Tribal Council delegates that you oppose this development. Time is of the essence: Please take action below by Saturday, Sept. 3.

  • Stop Offshore Drilling in Alaska's Cook Inlet
    Cook Inlet

    The Obama administration is proposing to lease 1 million acres of Alaska's Cook Inlet to oil and gas companies next year. If the lease sale is held, offshore drilling will be a fact of life in the region for decades to come, worsening the climate crisis and posing threats of pollution and devastating spills.

    The science is clear: To avoid the most catastrophic impacts of climate change, we must leave the majority of the world's fossil fuels in the ground. Alaska is already experiencing coastal erosion, increased storm effects, sea-ice retreat and permafrost melt and is preparing for the coming reality of climate change refugees: Numerous villages will need to relocate due to sea-level rise. As a matter of fact, Shishmaref village on Sarichef Island in the Chukchi Sea recently voted to relocate.

    Given the serious climate change hardships Alaska is already facing, selling the rights to burn more fossil fuels is irresponsible and foolhardy. Oil companies already have enough currently identified fossil fuel reserves to last for decades -- more than enough to get through the transition to clean power.

    Alaska still reels from the damage from the devastating 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster. New offshore-oil development poses the risk of more oil spills. Tribal tribal leaders in Chickaloon and Eklutna villages oppose the proposed oil and gas lease sale in their traditional homelands and waters because of the potential impacts to their subsistence way of life and precious environment.

    Please take action below to tell the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to adopt the "no action alternative" and cancel Lease Sale 244 to protect Alaska's climate, oceans, coastal environments, wildlife and communities.

  • Tell Obama: Keep Tar Sands Oil Off Our Rivers, Oceans
    Horseshoe crab

    If the oil industry gets its way, it'll soon be shipping 1.5 million barrels of tar sands crude per day to the United States from Canada via barges and supertankers. It's hard to imagine a worse energy plan: It threatens three major U.S. rivers (the Hudson, Mississippi and Columbia) and our shores on every coast with spills that are nearly impossible to clean up. Meanwhile the eventual burning of the tar sands oil will choke our atmosphere with 385 million tons of carbon pollution.

    President Obama has the authority to direct the U.S. Coast Guard and the Environmental Protection Agency to ban oil barges and supertankers in U.S. waters.

    Help protect America's coasts and rivers from devastating tar sands spills. Urge the president to ban tar sands traffic now.

  • Tell Missouri to Stop Unlimited For-profit Turtle Trapping
    Snapping turtle

    Because Missouri allows commercial trappers to take unlimited numbers of turtles from the state's rivers, thousands of the state's vulnerable turtles have been caught and killed over the past 10 years. Common snapping turtles and softshell turtles are sold domestically or exported to Asian markets to be slaughtered for food and medicine.

    Commercial trapping is devastating to turtle populations that are already suffering from threats like habitat destruction, water pollution and getting hit by cars. That's why the Center for Biological Diversity and the Great Rivers Environmental Law Center have asked the Missouri Department of Conservation to ban for-profit exploitation of the state's turtles.

    In response to our petition and because of your support, the department has agreed to address for-profit turtle trapping through a formal rulemaking.

    State officials now need to hear that you support a complete ban on commercial trapping of Missouri's turtles. Please take action today.

  • Tell BLM to Protect Colorado High Country From Fossil Fuel Development
    Thompson Divide

    Colorado's Thompson Divide is 221,500 acres of uninhabited forest and roadless mountain meadows -- habitat for countless animals, wild landscapes for people who love to be out in nature, and open lands for hunting and fishing.

    And it's a battleground for one of the West’s dirtiest public-lands energy conflicts.


    In 2003 and 2004, under the George W. Bush administration, the Bureau of Land Management quickly sold off the rights to drill thousands of acres in the Thompson Divide and White River National Forest. When it came to light that these leases were illegal, having been made without required environmental impact studies, the BLM last year considered cancelling 65 of the illegal leases. This is the right thing to do to protect public land from industrialization and our climate from more greenhouse gas pollution.

    But now the BLM is caving to industry pressure: A new and almost-final plan released a few weeks ago proposes to keep 40 of those leases open for development. This would mean building roads, drilling for oil, and the risk of water pollution in the middle of habitat for species like northern goshawk and native cutthroat trout.

    We have one final chance to tell the BLM to protect the Thompson Divide and adjacent roadless areas. Please take action below.

  • President Obama: Cancel the New Orleans Fossil Fuel Auction
    Louisiana flooding

    Last week Gulf Coast communities were inundated with extreme flooding from a massive storm. Tens of thousands of people have been evacuated, thousands of homes were damaged, and at least 11 people were killed.

    Louisiana is in a state of emergency. The Red Cross says it's the nation's worst disaster since Hurricane Sandy -- and it's exactly the sort of flooding that scientists warn will escalate with global warming.

    Unbelievably the Obama administration plans to make matters worse next week by auctioning 24 million acres for fossil fuel development in the Gulf of Mexico.

    In the face of this climate emergency, join us and our allies in the Gulf in urging President Obama to cancel next week's auction and end new federal fossil fuel leasing altogether.

    We need to keep fossil fuels in the ground and stop treating the Gulf Coast like a sacrifice zone. Offshore drilling endangers both the people of the Gulf and the climate we depend on. In the midst of this disaster, moving forward with this auction is unconscionable.

  • Speak Up for Wolf Protection in Oregon
    Oregon wolf

    Oregon's Wolf Conservation and Management Plan is currently being revised by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. When a draft of proposed revisions comes out for public comment later this year, the Center for Biological Diversity will thoroughly analyze it and guide our supporters in providing specific feedback to state officials.

    But the commission members need to hear from the public now, while they're drafting changes to the plan.

    There are three key areas wolf supporters should be commenting on right now to best ensure no harmful changes are made to the plan.

    First, we must hold the commission and the department to promises that this plan would prioritize the conservation of wolves, not their eradication. Second, we must retain the parts of the plan that have been proven to work well for all parties. And last, we must ensure that there is no public hunting or trapping of wolves, of any kind, in Oregon. Ever.

    Please take action -- write to the commission now and, if you can, customize your letter. Tell the commission you expect Oregon's wolf plan revisions to manage wolves as protectively as possible, and not weaken protections for wolves on behalf of special interests like the ranching and sport-hunting industry. Remind state officials of their obligation to manage and conserve wolves as a public trust for all Oregonians.

  • Say No to These Three Uranium Mines at Grand Canyon
    Warning sign

    The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality is preparing to issue permits to allow the operation of three uranium mines in greater Grand Canyon watershed. Of course, this would benefit Energy Fuels Resources, Inc., the mining company that's requesting the permits. But what do the rest of us get? Radioactive pollution that threatens human health, wildlife, and ground and surface water.

    Allowing private companies to profit at the expense of public health and the environment is just wrong -- and we can't let it happen.

    Uranium mining creates fine dust containing radioactive particles, lead and arsenic. Because the dust is so fine, it travels far from mines into our waterways, recreation sites and communities. It can increase the risk of lung cancer, birth defects and kidney disease. Uranium mining exacts other costs as well: The federal government has spent billions trying to clean up old uranium mines, and the costs continue to mount.

    The Center for Biological Diversity has been working to end all uranium mining in the greater Grand Canyon region. Stopping these three mines is a very important part of that greater goal, and we need your help to make it happen.

    Please take action below -- tell the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality that you oppose the operation of the Canyon, AZ1 and EZ uranium mines.

    And if you can, join us on Tuesday, Aug. 30 in Flagstaff at Sinagua Middle School to voice your opposition to the issuance of new permits that will allow toxic uranium mining to continue on the rim of Grand Canyon. If you plan to attend, RSVP to Katie Davis.

  • Overturn 'Citizens United' and Stop the War on Wildlife

    American burying beetle As a result of the U.S. Supreme Court's disastrous Citizens United ruling -- which holds that corporations are legal persons and money is "free speech" -- big moneyed interests are now allowed to spend unlimited amounts on political campaigns.

    Since the 2010 ruling, political contributions going directly to Congress from the oil and gas industry jumped from $14 million in 2010 to $25 million in 2014. And the back-scratching has been mutual: Members of Congress turned around and launched a 660 percent increase in legislative attacks on the Endangered Species Act and wildlife like American burying beetles and sage grouse, whose protection was in conflict with fossil fuel projects. 

    Fortunately senators on Capitol Hill have put forth Senate Bill 6 and Senate Joint Resolution 5 -- the "We the People Package" -- to make campaign reform a priority for the next Congress. The bills would put limits on campaign contributions, mandate public disclosures, and require all candidates running for federal office to report donations over $1,000.

    Your voice is needed -- sign our petition below to protect wildlife and end money's corrupt influence on U.S. politics. 

  • Speak Up for the Mojave Desert's Mountain Snails
    Mohave shoulderband snail

    The Mohave shoulderband snail is a tiny tan-and-pink snail that lives on just a few mountaintops in the Mojave Desert of Southern California. Its entire global range is less than eight square miles. Shoulderband snails have survived their extreme desert environment for tens of thousands of years, but their future is now threatened by climate change, industrial wind development, and mining.

    The Center for Biological Diversity is working to gain Endangered Species Act protection for the snail and to develop a conservation plan to ensure its survival. As a first step, we need the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to fund biological surveys to determine the snail's range and critical habitat needs.

    Snails aren't charismatic; they lack the graceful flight of birds, the muscles of jaguars, and the eye-catching patterns of giraffes. But snails play critical roles in building and maintaining the web of life, and they deserve our help. They decompose vegetative litter, recycle nutrients, build soils and provide food and calcium for many other animals including birds, amphibians, reptiles, small mammals and other invertebrates. They also help disperse seeds and fungi. Empty snail shells are used as shelters and egg-laying sites by insects and other arthropods. Snail shells return calcium to the soil and are the primary calcium source for the eggs of some bird species.

    Please send an email to the Fish and Wildlife Service urging it to prioritize funding for surveys so that we have the information to ensure that the Mohave shoulderband survives for future generations.

  • Stop Sage Grouse Hunting in California
    Sage grouse

    Like all greater sage grouse populations across the West, those in California have declined dramatically since the early 1900s. And it's no wonder why: Vast portions of their habitat have been significantly degraded or eliminated by livestock grazing, off-road vehicle use, roads, wildfire and relentless development.

    And while hunting has not been considered a major risk factor to the species to date, adding that variable to the mix further threatens the few small, isolated sage grouse populations still clinging to survival.

    That's why the state's wildlife officials should be taking steps to protect sage grouse rather than allowing trophy hunting to continue. 

    Please join with the Center in urging the California Fish and Game Commission to end hunting of this iconic sagebrush species.

  • Protect San Francisco Bay's Wildlife From Toxic Selenium
    Chinook salmon

    The Environmental Protection Agency has at last proposed to update its 1992 water-quality standards for the San Francisco Bay-Delta to address threats from a dangerous heavy metal called selenium.

    Selenium is a naturally occurring element and actually needed in tiny amounts by people -- but it becomes toxic in high concentrations when allowed to build up in the environment. In the 1980s concentrated selenium from agricultural runoff poisoned thousands of birds at the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge in California's Central Valley.

    It's also deadly for endangered fish such as chinook salmon and other wildlife like ducks that feed on clams (clams absorb high amounts of selenium when they filter water as they feed).

    Selenium is released into rivers and streams via oil refinery wastewater and agricultural runoff. But a new source could make matters worse: A proposal to build twin tunnels under the Bay-Delta could increase selenium concentrations by recycling selenium-laden water to Central Valley farms.

    Tell EPA to keep the Bay-Delta wild and livable by creating strong water-quality standards.

  • Speak Up for the Sierra Nevada's Forests
    Sequoia National Forest

    The U.S. Forest Service has published drafts of plans for the Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra national forests. These plans, which will determine how the forests are managed over the next 20 years, are abominable.

    Instead of protecting our public lands and the wildlife that make their home there, the draft plans expand the Service's power to allow the most destructive forms of logging, including clear-cutting and salvage logging.

    Clear-cutting and group selection (a technical term for mini-clearcuts about 3 acres in size) remove all the trees from one area at the same time, leaving only stumps behind. Salvage logging, which removes trees impacted by fire, destroys rich and necessary habitat for wildlife -- research shows that fire-killed trees are ecological gems that need to be protected, not logged. The Service's new plans would also allow expansion of a logging technique called "mechanical thinning." Some thinning can be helpful for reducing fire risk in areas adjacent to human communities, but the plans call for increased mechanical thinning in backcountry areas where it will harm habitat for rare wildlife.

    Forest plans are supposed to contain what are referred to as "standards and guidelines." But these new draft plans contain no meaningful standards or guidelines to prevent the Forest Service from harming important wildlife habitat or using destructive logging techniques in the wrong places. The new plans put a number of rare species at risk, including California spotted owls, fishers and black-backed woodpeckers.

    You will also be sorely disappointed to hear that although the Service could have recommended the addition of hundreds of thousands of wilderness acres to the national forests, it thus far is seeking zero new acres for the Sequoia or Sierra national forests.

    These forest management plans must be revised. Using the form below, tell the Forest Service to go back to the drawing board.

  • Oppose Grizzly Bear Hunting in Idaho
    Grizzly bear

    The future of grizzly bears in the Yellowstone region is at a pivotal point. Following a recent proposal from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to remove grizzlies from the endangered species list, Idaho just released proposed rules for public comment, which will determine how the state's bears are managed if federal protections are removed.

    So far it doesn't look good: The rules aim to allow trophy hunts.

    This destructive proposal comes at a time when key grizzly bear food sources in the heart of the Yellowstone ecosystem have been collapsing and grizzly mortality rates have been on the rise. It also fails to see the big picture, in which these bears have recovered in only 4 percent of their historic range.

    Using the form below, let Idaho know that trophy hunting is not appropriate for this recovering population -- and if you can, personalize your letter. Comments are due July 27.

  • It's Time to Ban Atrazine Now
    California red-legged frog

    A new analysis from the Environmental Protection Agency paints a grim picture for wildlife in the United States. The country's second-most commonly used pesticide, atrazine, is likely harming most species of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles, especially in the Midwest where its use is highest.

    Sadly the findings aren't all that shocking -- we've known about this for decades. The European Union banned atrazine a dozen years ago for exactly this reason.

    Around 70 million pounds of atrazine are used every year in the United States on crops, lawns, schools, playgrounds and athletic fields. And it's not just harming wildlife -- atrazine exposure has been linked to birth defects and cancer in humans.

    The chemical industry is fighting hard to keep the status quo. Tell the EPA to listen to its own scientists and not the chemical companies. We must ban atrazine now.

  • End Phosphate Strip Mining in Florida
    Sinkhole in phosphate mine

    Phosphate mining is one of the most destructive practices on Earth -- a brutal process that completely destroys landscapes and leaves behind 200-foot-tall, radioactive waste piles, which put people and wildlife, from gopher tortoises to sandhill cranes, at risk.

    On Aug. 27, 2016, a sinkhole opened under one of these waste piles, causing more than 200 million gallons of contaminated wastewater to enter the Floridan Aquifer. It's not the first time the state's main source of drinking water has been imperiled by the phosphate industry, nor is it likely to be the last.

    Mosaic (the largest phosphate mining company in Florida) wants to dig up an additional 50,000 acres of the state's beautiful, biodiverse lands, creating more radioactive waste. But this incident shows that Mosaic can't even handle the radioactive waste it currently generates.

    It's time for us to stand against this dangerous, destructive practice. Tell your elected officials to do everything in their power to end the blight of phosphate mining in Florida.

  • End Coal Leasing on Our Public Lands
    Coal train in Wyoming's Powder River Basin

    Coal is the most widespread and carbon-intensive fossil fuel in use today, a badge that carries no honor. Burning it contributes to, and intensifies, global food and water insecurity, heat waves and other extreme weather events, coastal flooding, Arctic sea-ice melt, coral reef loss and wildlife extinction.

    More than 40 percent of all U.S. coal comes from public lands, primarily the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. A little-known fact: Approximately 95 percent of known U.S. coal reserves are unburnable and must stay in the ground to meet our climate commitments.

    Decisions made today about the national coal program will have consequences for our energy and climate future for decades to come.

    Urge the Obama administration to evaluate and quantify all the costs and consequences of continuing coal leasing -- on climate, health, lands, rivers and wildlife. Now's the time to phase out coal leasing on our public lands.

  • Tell the Feds: Don't Let Big Oil Harm Cook Inlet's Beluga Whales
    Beluga whale

    Critically endangered Cook Inlet belugas are facing a significant new threat: the first large, multistage frack in Cook Inlet.

    Fracking blasts massive amounts of water mixed with toxic chemicals down oil and gas wells at pressures high enough to fracture rock. This extreme extraction method, which poses risks of oil spills, earthquakes and other accidents, has no place in unique and fragile ecosystems.

    Cook Inlet belugas -- among the most endangered whales on the planet -- are especially vulnerable to direct exposure to toxic fracking chemicals and the killing or harming of their prey. These belugas are already under great duress from industrialization of their habitat near Anchorage. The last thing they need in their struggle to recover and survive is a vast fracking operation in their habitat.

    Nevertheless, an oil company named BlueCrest Energy wants to establish new wells and conduct the first large, multistage frack using horizontal drilling ever done in Alaska's environmentally sensitive Cook Inlet. And it wants to start fracking now -- this summer.

    Fortunately, we can still stop this dangerous project. BlueCrest needs a permit from the National Marine Fisheries Service to begin its planned drilling activities. And the Fisheries Service has the power to protect Cook Inlet beluga whales from toxic offshore fracking.

    Urge the Fisheries Service to block BlueCrest's plans and protect our rare, threatened whales.

  • Don't Let Developers Pull Strings to Wreck the Coast
    California coast

    California's coastline is some of the most beloved and valuable land in the world. So it shouldn't come as a surprise that real-estate development interests have been secretly trying to influence decision-makers. After a series of controversies this year over how California's coastal zone is being managed, and for whom, new legislation seeks to ensure the people's business is conducted in the open rather than in private meetings.

    The California Coastal Commission was created in the 1970s by the landmark Coastal Act to protect the coast and its unique wildlife habitat. But in recent years, its mission has been compromised by private meetings between its politically appointed commissioners and those seeking to maximize the value of their coastal real-estate investments. First it was a rock star getting preferential treatment after meeting privately with commissioners in Ireland. Then a series of private meetings undercut a staff recommendation to deny the massive Banning Ranch project in Newport Beach late last year. Finally there was this year's controversial firing of Executive Director Charles Lester in a coup orchestrated by the most pro-development commissioners.

    Current rules require commissioners to report private communications, but those rules were ignored by Commission Chair Steve Kinney in the Banning Ranch case. And even when the rules are followed, they do little to deter unfairly influenced decisions or illuminate what really takes place during private meetings.

    Senate Bill 1190 would ban all ex parte communications and require the people's business to be conducted in open session. Let your representatives know you support it.

  • Tell the Feds: Ban Imports of Fish Stunned With Cyanide
    Clownfish

    The tropical fish trade has a deadly secret. Each year up to 90 percent of the 12.5 million tropical fish entering the United States as pets are caught illegally using cyanide poison.

    The process is as horrific as you imagine -- divers in countries like Indonesia and the Philippines squirt deadly liquid cyanide directly onto coral reefs. The poison wreaks havoc on the environment, killing coral and as much as 75 percent of the nearby fish population on contact. The dead fish are left floating along ruined reefs, while the stunned survivors are collected and shipped to the United States to be sold for aquariums. As much as 500 metric tons of cyanide are dumped annually on reefs in the Philippines alone. The damage done is incalculable. It must stop.

    Urge federal authorities to use their power under the Lacey Act to halt illegal imports and help end this outrageous practice.

  • Keep the North Woods Alive With Moose
    Moose

    Because moose are built to live in cold environments, our warming climate puts them at increased risk of overheating, leading to malnutrition and lowered immune systems. Making matters worse, ticks and other parasites that harm moose thrive with rising temperatures.

    These threats -- along with habitat destruction from logging and mining in the North Woods -- are pushing moose to the brink in the upper Midwest. In fact, Minnesota has already lost more than half of its moose, and scientists have warned that the animals could disappear from the state within five years if the trend isn't reversed.

    Fortunately there's still hope for preserving this piece of the region's natural heritage: In response to a petition from the Center, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced that moose in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan and North Dakota may warrant federal protection.

    Join others in defending these beautiful giants of the North Woods. Urge the Service to quickly move forward with protections for moose.

  • Tell Gov. Brown: Stop Watering California Crops With Oil Wastewater
    Oil derrick

    Do you live in the United States? Do you eat commercially grown almonds, pistachios, citrus, grapes or vegetables? If so, there's a chance you're eating food that was grown using treated waste from toxic oilfields.

    Big Oil makes millions by selling recycled waste from oilfields to Central Valley farmers desperate for water. Hundreds of chemicals are used in oil operations, some known to cause cancer, kidney failure and liver damage -- and these chemicals could be in the oil waste used to irrigate our nuts, fruits and vegetables. California grows about half of all of the produce in the U.S., so this is a problem for all of us.

    And, deeply troubling, samples of oil wastewater have been shown to contain dangerous levels of acetone, oil and benzene, a known human carcinogen.

    The state has convened a panel to review statewide practices, but the process is plagued by shoddy testing standards, poor public access and the presence of oil industry representatives on the panel. Meanwhile, we're still eating food grown with oil waste. And as California braces for another dry summer, plans are underway to expand the use of oil wastewater for crop irrigation.

    We need to put an end to this practice immediately. Please sign this petition urging Gov. Brown and state water officials to prohibit the use of oil wastewater for crop irrigation in California.

  • Tell Congress: Don't Sell Out Wolves, Wildlife
    Sage grouse

    They're at it again. Attached to this year's "Department of Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill" (the annual spending bill for agencies like the EPA and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) are several disastrous riders that have nothing to do with our nation's budget and are a shameful attempt to undermine science, democracy and environmental laws. Republicans in Congress are trying to sneak these riders through -- and we need your help to make sure that doesn't happen.

    Please call your representatives and tell them to vote no on this bill until these riders are removed. If these riders go through, gray wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region will lose federal protections, greater sage grouse will never get the protection they need, and endangered salmon and Delta smelt may never get a chance to thrive in the wild. 

    You can leave your message with the receptionist or at the office's voicemail.

    Here's a sample call script. Type in your ZIP code below to get your representatives' phone numbers, then let us know you called.

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______.  I'm calling to urge you to oppose the gray wolf delisting rider and any anti-endangered species riders that have been, once again, attached to this year's Interior appropriations bill. These riders have nothing to do with our nation's budget and are a shameful attempt to undermine science, democracy and environmental laws.

    Please stay strong -- do not cut any deal that would undermine the Endangered Species Act or our environmental protections. Thank you.

  • Take Action for Terrapins: Ban Their Unsustainable Harvest
    Diamondback terrapin

    Named for the beautiful pattern on their shells, diamondback terrapins are a charming and important part of estuarine ecosystems along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. But they're in grave peril now due to habitat loss, vehicle collisions, entrapment in crab pots and overcollection.

    New Jersey state laws currently allow unlimited commercial harvest of diamondback terrapins, which are captured to serve voracious Asian markets. This wildly unsustainable practice has devastated the state's terrapins, threatening their very existence.

    Fortunately New Jersey has stepped up for terrapins, proposing legislation and an environmental regulation to ban their harvest.

    Tell Gov. Christie and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection that you support this ban to help terrapins recover.

  • Don't Let the Santa Ana Suckers' River Go Dry
    Santa Ana sucker

    For tens of thousands of years, Santa Ana suckers have survived floods, droughts and other natural events. But this rare fish with a funny face is now threatened with extinction in its namesake river, the Santa Ana.

    The sucker currently lives in just four to 10 miles of the Santa Ana that's fed primarily by outflows from water treatment plants. However, the plant that provides most of this water is proposing to divert more than two-thirds of its outflow away from the river into spreading basins for groundwater replenishment. This would cause major portions of the sucker's habitat to go dry, threatening to extirpate the fish from the river.

    The proposal also would hurt southwestern willow flycatchers and least Bell's vireos, threatened birds that rely on the riparian habitat flanking the Santa Ana River for successful breeding. The current outflow also sustains federally protected critical habitat for flycatchers.

    Monitoring of the Santa Ana sucker population in the river over the past 10 years already shows a steady downward decline. Diverting more water and drying up its last remaining habitat will be disastrous.

    Speak up for suckers -- tell the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department to reject the proposal to divert water treatment plant outflows away from the Santa Ana River.

  • Don't Let BLM Spark Climate Disaster in Utah
    Utah's Book Cliffs

    High-carbon energy development in the face of a worsening climate crisis is dangerous public policy. That's why it's so disturbing that the Bureau of Land Management is on the verge of paving the way for dirty oil shale development in the Uinta Basin, near Utah's scenic Book Cliffs and the Green and White rivers.

    A pending request for a right of way from an Estonian company would allow it to build oil, gas and electric transmission lines across miles of public land and strip mine thousands of acres for oil shale, one of the world's most carbon-intensive fossil fuels.

    When superheated, oil shale rock becomes a goo that can be refined and used as liquid petroleum. But the process requires huge energy inputs and results in massive carbon outputs -- in this case, half a billion tons of potential greenhouse gas pollution.  

    The proposed project would also cause enormous ecological harm -- converting wildlands into industrialized wastelands, fouling the air, and withdrawing huge amounts of water from the already-overallocated Colorado River basin.

    Protect Utah's beautiful desert and urge the BLM to deny the company's application.

  • Fight Food Waste, Standardize Date Labels
    Food date label

    Food date labels are notoriously confusing -- a problem that's led to 90 percent of Americans tossing perfectly safe food because the date printed on the packaging has passed. But before you do so next time, consider: Unless they're printed on infant formula, those expiration dates are virtually unregulated.

    When food is wasted, all of the land, water, pesticides, fossil fuels and other costs to wildlife and the environment that went into producing that food are wasted, too. And Americans waste a lot of food -- about 40 percent of edible food goes uneaten, and too much of that is thrown away simply because of arbitrary dates on packaging.

    The Food Date Labeling Act, introduced by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-Maine), would create a national system for date labels that distinguishes between when food may have passed its peak freshness and when it may become unsafe, in addition to allowing food to be sold or donated past its "best if used by" date.

    It's estimated that creating a standard, meaningful system for expiration dates could divert nearly 400,000 tons of food from landfills each year and save more than 1.5 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and 192 billion gallons of water.

    Help fight food waste by urging your legislators to support the Food Date Labeling Act and keep food, money and natural resources out of the garbage.

  • Tell EPA to Protect Bees, Not Pesticide Companies

    Honey beeThe USDA's honey bee die-off numbers just came out and the news is grim. Beekeepers lost an average of 44 percent of their honey bee colonies last year, and recent research indicates that other pollinator species like native bees are also in steep decline.

    The cause is no mystery. Scientists have determined that certain pesticides called
    neonicotinoids are a leading cause of pollinator decline. So why isn't the Environmental Protection Agency using its authority to halt the widespread use of these toxic chemicals and save our bees? Because it's under massive pressure from pesticide industry, which is doing everything it can to protect its profits.

    Powerful international pesticide companies are pouring millions of dollars into campaigns shifting the blame for bee deaths away from pesticides, despite abundant research linking pesticides to bee declines. We know the EPA is getting an earful from these corporations, and that's why we need to make our voices heard too.

    The good news is that we're gaining ground. In January the EPA finally admitted that imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid, poses risks to honey bees, and this is just the beginning. The reason the agency has begun to listen to the growing body of independent science confirming the role of pesticides in bee die-offs is because of relentless pressure from activists like you.

    Now we need to turn up the heat to make sure the harmful effects from these pesticides are eliminated once and for all. Together with our allies, we are working to bring 2 million signatures to the EPA in the next three weeks. Please take action now and tell the EPA it needs to do its job and protect bees, the planet and all of us from pollinator-killing pesticides.

  • End Unlimited Trapping of Iowa's Wild Turtles
    Common snapping turtle

    Threats like habitat destruction, pollution and trapping are causing alarming declines in freshwater turtle populations across the country. Fortunately, in response to public outcry and a 2009 petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is now considering rules to protect turtles from trapping during their nesting season (January 1 to July 15) as well as daily quotas that limit how many turtles can be killed by trappers.

    Advocacy by the Center has led to states across the country restricting trapping to prevent further declines of these vulnerable animals. Although Iowa should ultimately end commercial turtle trapping outright, season closures and daily bag limits are crucial first steps.

    Speak up for freshwater turtles -- tell state officials you support regulations to help protect Iowa's wild turtles from trapping.

  • Tell Congress: Just Say No to Disastrous Energy Bill
    Fracked landscape

    Right now, industry special interests are trying to pass one of the most environmentally damaging energy bills ever contemplated in Congress. If it becomes law, our efforts to protect wildlife and public lands, and avoid disastrous climate change, will be set back by decades.

    The list of riders attached to the so-called "Energy Policy Modernization Act of 2016" (S.2012) is appalling. If passed, the bill would:

    • Fast-track the approval and expansion of fracking projects nationwide;
    • Accelerate the logging and burning of precious trees for electricity;
    • End federal protections for gray wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region;
    • Undermine global efforts to stem the slaughter of African elephants;
    • Allow big agribusiness to wreck California's Bay-Delta ecosystem; and
    • Expedite mining on public lands without
      meaningful environmental review.

    Write your senators today and tell them to reject this horrible bill outright because big-business giveaways are not the path to the clean-energy future we need.

  • Protect Montana's Wildlife From This Year's Hunts
    Bobcat, fisher, wolf, grizzly

    Over the next month Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks is taking public comment to determine rules for the state's annual hunting and trapping season (view the proposals), which will include specific "quotas" for each species stating how many animals are allowed to be killed.

    At the end of the day much depends on these final numbers: whether grizzlies continue on the path toward recovery, whether visitors will hear the howl of wolves next year near Yellowstone, and whether bobcats, fishers and a host of other furbearing animals will be reduced to pelts and sold overseas.

    Please take a moment today and speak up for these magnificent creatures.

    Tell Montana's wildlife officials that you don't support a grizzly bear hunt, even if federal protections are removed; that you don't support increasing wolf quotas around Yellowstone; and that you'd like to see the rest of the state's wildlife preserved, not killed.

  • Restore Funding for Citizen Science, Frogs
    Spring peeper

    Frog songs are music to our ears -- but they're also a key tool for tracking the health of wildlife and ecosystems. For years the U.S. Geological Survey has overseen the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program, a unique initiative that trains novice enthusiasts ("citizen scientists") to get out in the field, identify frog calls and submit data to a central website. Government scientists use this information to study and document the status of frogs across the country.

    But due to insufficient congressional funding, USGS had to shutter this program in 2016 -- bringing years of important research to a halt and hindering many state conservation efforts. This is bad news for amphibians, which increasingly face extinction from threats like pollution, habitat destruction and climate change.

    Don't let our amphibians lose this crucial support. Tell Congress to restore funding for the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program.

  • Help Make Joshua Tree National Park Whole Again
    Bighorn sheep

    Land that was removed from Joshua Tree National Park in the 1940s for iron mining is now available to be reincorporated into the park. The Park Service has submitted a proposal that contains several scenarios for restoring this land. Help us urge the Park Service to make the best plan for the park's plants and animals -- a plan that combines two alternatives set forth in the proposal.

    Alternative C from the Park Service's proposal is beneficial because it outlines the immediate reincorporation of 22,515 acres of BLM-managed lands back into the park. However, the Park Service needs to include Alternative D's long-term vision of repatriating all the remaining 6,085 acres of state and private lands as they become available for acquisition. Only this hybrid alternative will successfully return Joshua Tree National Park to its former 1936 boundary as quickly as possible.

    Tell the Park Service to combine Alternatives C and D to immediately reincorporate 22,515 acres and also set the long-term goal of reincorporating all remaining lands that were temporarily cut out of the park, returning it to its original boundary.

  • Hold Your Ground: No New Drilling in the Gulf
    Snowy egret

    Join the tide of resistance to oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. Hundreds rallied for "No New Leases" in March on a historic day at New Orleans' Superdome, and hundreds more turned out at public hearings to demand that the Obama administration end, not expand, offshore drilling.

    We know the administration heard us loud and clear -- the movement has garnered major national media attention, and the feds heightened security at the public hearings -- but they're still not responding to our many concerns.

    As the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management proposal stands, the feds still plan to hold 10 lease sales from 2017-2022 that would offer up more than 70 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico to fossil fuel companies. This would condemn the Gulf to decades of dirty extraction when we need to be moving in the opposite direction.

    Tell the feds that they're standing on the wrong side of history. It's time to end all new oil and gas leases and keep these fossil fuels in the ground.

  • Don't Make This Tortoise Wait Any Longer
    Gopher tortoise

    Gopher tortoises spend their days munching leafy greens under open canopies of pine trees and industriously digging burrows to hide from extreme weather and predators. But they're also team players, sharing their burrows with hundreds of other species like rabbits, foxes, quail, owls, frogs and rare eastern indigo snakes.

    Unfortunately this keystone species is struggling to survive as its woods are destroyed to make way for pine plantations and urban development. Although western populations of gopher tortoises are protected under the Endangered Species Act, eastern populations are not -- and they continue to lose their homes and lives.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service knows these tortoises are on the road to extinction, but relegated them to a waiting list that offers them no protection. Many candidate species have gone extinct waiting for the Act's vital safeguards; the gopher tortoise has already waited for more than a decade. Time is of the essence.

    Tell the Service to protect eastern gopher tortoises before it's too late.

  • Tell USDA to Promote Sustainable Diets
    Extinction Facts Label

    Research shows that we can't meet international climate targets without reducing meat and dairy consumption. The U.S. Department of Agriculture had the opportunity to include sustainability in its latest dietary guidelines, but the agency ignored the science and overwhelming public support, instead releasing recommendations that the meat industry could celebrate.

    The agency says that sustainable diets are an important policy conversation, but it remains silent about the effects of America's super-sized appetite for meat and dairy. We need that conversation now more than ever.

    Governments around the world -- including the Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden -- have published national dietary guidelines urging people to eat less meat. This advice has enormous influence. It can change how people eat and how menus are created in schools and government facilities. And ultimately it can change the quantity of greenhouse gases released into our atmosphere.

    It's time for the USDA to acknowledge that animal products demand more resources than plant-based foods and take concrete steps to address the environmental and health problems that come with high meat and dairy consumption.

    Urge the USDA to issue a public statement and plan of action to promote a sustainable American diet. Then read and share our Extinction Facts labels.

  • Say No to Big Coal in Bangladesh's Mangroves

    Bengal tiger The Sundarbans in Bangladesh -- the world's largest mangrove forest, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and a safe haven for Bengal tigers and other endangered species -- is under serious threat from Big Coal.

    Orion Group, a Bangladeshi conglomerate, is building a coal-fired plant near the edge of the World Heritage site. The plant's infrastructure, shipping and emissions will have devastating effects on the Sundarbans and the thousands of people who depend on the forest ecosystem for their livelihoods. And it will come in addition to a second coal-fired plant the company is building near the capital of Dhaka. Together these plants will spew millions of tons of carbon into the atmosphere -- in Bangladesh, one of the nations at highest risk from climate change.

    Orion has reportedly approached the Export-Import Bank, a U.S. government agency with a long track record of committing billions of taxpayer dollars to finance fossil fuel projects abroad. Ex-Im Bank's support for Orion's plants would grease the wheels for coal development abroad, even as the United States moves away from dirty coal on the domestic front.

    Sign the petition to tell Ex-Im Bank to promptly, publicly deny funding for Orion’s coal plants.

  • Stop This Gargantuan Coal Terminal in Its Tracks
    Coal Train

    A corporation named Millennium Bulk Terminals is proposing to build a coal-export terminal in Longview, Wash., near the Columbia River. This facility -- which if built will be the largest of its kind in North America -- would bring toxic coal dust, air pollution, and increased traffic to the Pacific Northwest. We can't let that happen.

    Coal mined in Montana would be transported to the Longview terminal on trains and barges, threatening communities and wildlife all along the way with coal dust, diesel exhaust and spills. From the terminal, coal would be shipped to buyers in Asia, where its use would contribute to the climate crisis.

    From mines in Montana, across tracks in Idaho, onto barges in Washington, and then through smokestacks in Asia, coal poses an unacceptable threat to our health and climate.

    We have an opportunity to raise our voices against dirty coal and in favor of a clean-energy future. Help us stop the disastrous Millennium Bulk coal-export terminal in its tracks.

  • Keep Illinois Chorus Frogs From Going Silent
    Illinois chorus frog

    Illinois chorus frogs are in trouble. These rare, inch-long frogs don't ask much -- shallow ponds to breed in and sandy soils to escape harsh weather -- but even that is proving hard to come by. From all sides developers are creeping in on their ancient homes.
     
    And now one of the last populations of chorus frogs in Madison County, Ill., is at risk. Developers plan to build a 652-acre shipping center right beside the most important conservation area remaining in the county. The chorus frogs need this area and the surrounding land to live and mate. The proposed project would directly kill them during construction, destroy their habitat and subject them to toxic pollution, introduced predators and roadkills.

    Right now the developers seek permission from the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to move forward with construction, even though they've failed to provide scientific information or conservation measures to ensure the project won't drive the frogs closer to extinction.

    Tell Illinois DNR to deny the developer's application and keep this frog song alive.

  • Yellowstone Bears Need Your Help
    Grizzly bears

    Grizzly bear numbers in the Greater Yellowstone area have improved since the animals were first protected in 1975, but the bears continue to be threatened by isolation from other grizzly populations, loss of key food sources and human-caused mortalities. Overall grizzlies occupy less than 5 percent of their historic range in the lower 48 -- and yet the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to remove protections from Yellowstone's bears.

    The plan presents a potentially tremendous setback. To make matters worse, the states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana have all enacted plans that would allow for trophy hunting of grizzly bears upon delisting. Idaho's plan is severely outdated, and none of the plans do enough to protect grizzly bears into the future. 

    Tell the Service to maintain protections for Yellowstone grizzly bears. If removed, we know what to expect: Wyoming, Idaho and Montana have already agreed to allow trophy hunts.

  • Is 'Natural' Food Really Natural?
    Grocery cart

    Pesticides, antibiotics and other synthetic chemicals are often used in the production of food on store shelves -- including foods that are labeled "natural." This misleading label makes it increasingly difficult to make informed decisions about the food that nourishes you and your family.

    Nearly 90 percent of people expect "natural" to mean more than it currently does. This disconnect means that people are being misled by the term. Ultimately it undermines our ability to drive change with our pocketbooks.

    Based on pressure from both the public and industry, the Food and Drug Administration is considering defining the term natural in food products -- a move that could create a meaningful label for people to make more Earth-friendly choices or, alternatively, may create yet another way for companies to greenwash products.
     
    Tell the FDA to prohibit the use of the "natural" label on foods produced from GE crops or by any other unnatural means of production.

  • Stop Nestlé From Sucking Strawberry Creek Dry
    Yellow-legged frog

    Under a permit that's been expired since 1988, Nestlé sucks 68,000 gallons of water a day from Strawberry Creek in California's San Bernardino National Forest -- a precious waterway that's home to rare and endangered fish, amphibians and birds. But Nestlé's diversions are putting the creek at risk: Its water levels are at record lows.

    The Center for Biological Diversity and partners sued the U.S. Forest Service over Nestlé's expired permit to force the Service to conduct the environmental impact analysis the creek needs. In response the agency finally started a permit-renewal process -- but it's proposing to let Nestlé continue piping water out of the forest while the environmental impact studies are conducted. And that's not good enough.

    The Forest Service needs to consider alternate proposals for the permit process, as well as comprehensively analyze the impacts of its actions on all the forest's resources, including wildlife and habitat. The Service also should analyze the downstream impacts of plastic water bottle pollution that results from Nestlé's bottling operations.

    Using the form below, tell the Service to draft new proposals that better serve Strawberry Creek and the plants and animals that rely on it for their existence.

  • Raise Your Voice to Save Oak Flat
    Oak Flat

    In December 2014 international mining giant Rio Tinto engineered a backroom deal in the U.S. Congress to authorize a land exchange that would enable it to carve a massive copper mine out of Oak Flat, a precious, unique place that has been off limits to mining for 60 years. This sleazy deal kicked off a campaign of resistance by the San Carlos Apache and their allies, who have occupied Oak Flat continuously since February 2015 in an effort to defend land that is sacred to them.

    But the law also mandates that an environmental impact statement be prepared before the land exchange can be completed. This process allows room for public input, which is very important in holding the Forest Service accountable and ensuring a transparent and fair analysis.

    Take action now to make sure the Forest Service considers your concerns about the future of Oak Flat. The agency's analysis includes environmental, social, cultural, economic and any other foreseeable impacts, so feel free to add your own concerns to those suggested in the sample letter.

  • Protect Public Lands

    Sandhill cranes The timelessness of the Grand Canyon; the remote solitude of Alaska's wild frontier; Great Smoky Mountains National Park; the redwoods and the Everglades -- America's public lands are national treasures owned by all of us and held in trust for wildlife and future generations. They include more than 600 million acres of towering forests, rushing rivers, swaying grasslands and magical deserts.

    Sadly these special places are under attack, and we need your help to make sure these public lands remain in public hands.

    In January, armed militants illegally took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Oregon. And while the occupation came to an end, the struggle to protect our public lands is far from finished. Politicians in Washington, D.C., and state legislatures across the nation have proposed bills designed to hand over our public lands to the states or private developers. We can't let that happen.

    Stand up and protect your public lands. Please sign the petition below and share it with your family, friends and anyone you know who values America's public lands.

  • Stop This Blob From Getting Any Bigger
    Methane cloud over Four Corners region

    Southern Colorado's HD Mountains Roadless Area is rich with ponderosa pine forests, Mexican spotted owls and ancient American Indian sites. Yet hanging over the region is the largest patch of methane pollution in the United States, discovered recently by NASA scientists.
     
    To make matters worse, the U.S. Forest Service now proposes to let the fossil fuel industry drill on an additional 6,000 acres. And not just anywhere -- the plan includes drilling in officially protected roadless areas.
     
    We need your help stopping this proposal. More dangerous drilling on our public lands will only deepen the climate crisis. And the industrialization that comes with such development will ruin remote wildlands and habitat -- values that are rare, and difficult or impossible to replace.
     
    Using the form below, tell the Forest Service to withdraw its proposal immediately and keep these fossil fuels in the ground.

  • Protect Sea Turtles -- Ban Harmful Gillnet Fishing in California
    Leatherback sea turtle hatchling

    With scientists predicting extinction for leatherback sea turtles as soon as 2030, the killing of even one more of these rare, ancient animals is too many. That's why the turtles need your support for California Senate Bill 1114, which would ban the use of indiscriminate drift gillnets.

    Drift gillnets are fishing nets as long as the Golden Gate Bridge that are set out to drift overnight, unattended, through our oceans. While the nets are intended for swordfish and sharks, they catch just about everything in their mile-wide path. Whales, dolphins, sea lions and endangered leatherback sea turtles are snared in these "walls of death" where they drown, their bodies thrown away as trash.

    Fortunately, a California senate bill has been proposed that would transition California's fisheries away from wasteful gillnets to targeted, more sustainable hook-and-line gear. This bill gives hope to rare and vanishing marine animals like leatherbacks.

    Using the form below, please urge your state representatives to support S.B. 1114, the "Sustainable Swordfish and Marine Life Protection Act."

  • Ban Super-toxic Rat Poisons in California
    San Joaquin kit fox

    As the name implies, rodenticides are used to control rodents -- but these toxic chemicals also have deadly, unintended effects: They frequently poison wildlife, pets and even children.  

    Wildlife poisonings and deaths have been documented in numerous species, including eagles, hawks, falcons, owls, bobcats, mountain lions and endangered San Joaquin kit foxes. Poisonings also occur each year in thousands of children and pets across the United States.

    Safer alternatives exist that are inexpensive and effective, yet many consumers and pest-control companies refuse the safer fix. Now a new bill in the California legislature, A.B. 2596 (Bloom), will allow for rational controls on these dangerous poisons to eliminate their use where they lead to nontarget poisonings, while still allowing for limited applications to protect the state's agricultural economy, public health and environment.

    Act now to urge your elected officials to ban the use of dangerous rodenticides in urban areas, where they pose unnecessary risks to people, pets and wildlife.

  • Rein in the U.S. Market for Endangered Wildlife
    African elephant, pangolin

    It's time to address the massive elephant in the room -- because if we don't, the booming international trade in wildlife could soon wipe out two of the world's most imperiled species.

    Africa's elephants are being poached to near extinction for their ivory. Fewer than 100,000 forest elephants and 400,000 savannah elephants are thought to remain, down from more than 1 million animals just 40 years ago. Yet some ivory sales remain legal in the United States -- and, in fact, the country has the world's second-largest ivory market behind China.

    Pangolins, small and exotic-looking mammals covered with large scales, once inhabited broad swaths of Asia and Africa but have been poached to near extinction in many areas. Hunted for their meat and scales (believed by some to have medicinal properties), these adorably armored wonders may soon disappear due to their legal sale in Asia and the United States.

    To raise the alarm and restrict trade in these imperiled species, last year the Center for Biological Diversity and allies asked the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect pangolins and both African elephant species as endangered.

    The Service just agreed that such action may be warranted -- so tell the agency to do its part to save these species and end the trade in rare wildlife.

  • Tom Vilsack: Don't Use 'Judas' Wolves to Kill Whole Families
    Gray wolf

    The wildlife haters will stop at nothing to kill America's gray wolves.

    We've learned that the U.S. Department of Agriculture's rogue wildlife-killing program, Wildlife Services, is using the gruesome tactic of "Judas" wolves to locate and slaughter whole wolf families.

    Wolves are sensitive, intelligent, social animals, and those are exactly the traits the killers at Wildlife Services are exploiting. A Judas wolf is a wolf that is captured, outfitted with a radio collar and turned loose to lead hunters straight to its pack. Once the wolf's family is located, aerial gunners in helicopters swoop in and slaughter it -- leaving the Judas wolf alive to lead the killers to another pack next season.

    The Judas scheme -- officially called "collaring for later control" -- uses unsuspecting wolves to betray their families over and over until the day they die, or the batteries in their collars run down.

    It's time to end this cruel practice once and for all. Tell Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to immediately end the use of "collaring for later control" to kill entire family packs.

  • Get the Lead Out of Minnesota Ammunition
    Bald eagle

    The scientific evidence is extensive and the facts are undeniable: Toxic lead from hunting ammunition enters the food chain and exacts a deadly toll on wildlife. Spent lead ammunition regularly poisons and kills bald eagles, trumpeter swans and other birds. It also poses serious health risks for people who eat wild game.

    We've removed lead from our homes, gas tanks and children's toys -- but not from ammunition, a persistent source of toxic lead in the environment. The time to act on this issue is now.

    The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has proposed a reasonable phase-in of nontoxic shot for small-game hunters in farmland Wildlife Management Areas. But in response, right-wing lawmakers proposed House Bill 3209, which would prohibit the agency from adopting rules that further restrict the use of lead shot.

    Tell your lawmakers that you oppose any legislative efforts to prohibit the state agency from taking reasonable action to safeguard Minnesota's wildlife and human health from lead shot.

  • End Commercial Fur Trapping in California
    Fox

    In November 2015 conservationists celebrated when the California Fish and Game Commission voted to ban bobcat trapping, an important step toward bringing the state's wildlife management into the 21st century. But the job was left undone: Foxes, coyotes, badgers and a host of other furbearing animals are still subject to cruel trapping, and it's come to light that the state's oversight of its trapping program is illegal.

    California law requires that the state's costs of managing a fur-trapping program must be fully recovered through trapping-license fees. But the state spends hundreds of thousands of dollars on wardens, biologists and administrators to oversee trapping, yet only brings in a tiny fraction of that amount in fees. Taxpayers are footing the bill for the rest.

    With any luck, that will soon end. At its upcoming meeting the commission will consider a Center for Biological Diversity petition to comply with this never-enforced provision of California law. If implemented, it could mean the end of commercial trapping in the state.

    Tell California's Fish and Game Commission that you value wildlife alive and fully support ending all commercial fur trapping in the state.

  • Let's Ban Leaded Gasoline Once and for All
    Small aircraft

    Although leaded gasoline was banned for use in road vehicles in 1995, more than 70 percent of U.S. airplanes still use fuel containing lead. These planes create almost 500 metric tons of lead emissions per year, much of which lingers around airports, exposing an estimated 3 million children who live and go to school in these areas.

    A 2011 Duke University study found that children living within about 550 yards of an airport where leaded aviation gas is used have higher blood lead levels than other children. These children are disproportionately low income and from minority populations, reflecting an ugly national truth: Environmental pollution hurts low-income families far more than others.

    Lead is an extremely toxic heavy metal that can cause severe nervous system damage, reduced intelligence, behavioral changes and developmental defects that are often irreversible. This is not only the case for humans, but for many species of animals we share this world with. It's high time we stopped using leaded aviation gasoline.

    Fortunately, a bill recently introduced into the House of Representatives would result in a ban on leaded aviation gasoline in the United States.

    Don't let our children keep breathing lead -- using the form below, please urge your representative to vote yes on the "No Lead in the Air Act of 2016."

  • Keep Offshore Oil Where It Belongs -- In the Ground
    Polar bear

    To meet international climate agreements from the Paris accord and prevent dangerous climate change, we need to keep oil and gas in the ground -- no doubt about it. Yet the Obama administration has announced plans to do just the opposite. It proposes to expand oil and gas leasing in the Arctic (which has been largely off limits) and ramp up drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, still suffering from 2010's Deepwater Horizon disaster.
     
    Under the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management's proposed five-year plan, there would be 13 lease sales from 2017 to 2022: 10 sales in the Gulf of Mexico and three off the coast of Alaska.

    And while President Obama is using executive action to put some of the most sensitive areas in the Arctic's Beaufort and Chukchi seas off limits, this falls far short of what we really need: an end to all new oil and gas leasing in public waters.

    Tell President Obama that if he's going to meet his climate promises, he needs to step up and keep fossil fuels in the ground. That means ending, not expanding, offshore oil and gas leases under his administration's five-year plan.

  • Burning Trees for Electricity? Tell the Senate That Doesn't Make Sense
    Clearcut
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    The U.S. Senate is considering a bill that contains an amendment that would force government agencies to ignore carbon pollution from forest bioenergy -- the large-scale burning of trees to generate electricity. The senators who introduced the amendment argue that burning forests is "carbon neutral" because new trees may eventually reabsorb carbon as they grow.

    That's profoundly anti-science.

    Wood-burning power plants release even more carbon than coal or gas plants per megawatt-hour, so replacing coal and gas with wood increases immediate climate pollution. Even if all the trees we burn today are replaced by new trees -- and there's no guarantee that will happen -- it will take decades or longer for the carbon to be reabsorbed. And we need to tackle the climate crisis right now.

    For the past few years the EPA has been working with scientific experts to figure out how to account for carbon emissions from burning wood, and other fuel derived from biomass, in a scientifically credible way. But the new amendment would slam the door on that scientific process by requiring the EPA to pretend CO
    2 created by burning wood simply doesn't exist. Solving the climate crisis and protecting America's forests requires following the science, not trying to change the laws of physics.

    Treating wood as carbon neutral would promote dirty, inefficient energy production, undermining any gains we make under the Clean Power Plan, Paris Accord or other climate policies. Instead of looking for more things to burn, we should be focused on clean-energy options like wind and solar.

    The amendment also could lead to a ransacking of our forests. In Europe, where regulators ignore biomass carbon, huge power plants are already importing shiploads of wood pellets -- made by clearcutting native forests -- from the United States. If the EPA follows suit, many more of our trees will fall, taking precious habitat and wild creatures with them.

    Ask your senator to remove amendment No. 3140 from S.B. 2012 and oppose any similar efforts to override clear scientific facts for political expedience.

  • Demand an End to California Offshore Fracking
    Offshore drilling platform

    The federal government just gave the green light to fracking off California's coast. But offshore fracking is a dirty, dangerous practice that increases the risk of oil spills and earthquakes and has no place in our ocean.
     
    Indeed, even though fracking has a track record of making people sick and polluting the environment, the government just completed a cursory analysis that found offshore fracking has "no significant environmental impacts." This lifts a moratorium won by the Center for Biological Diversity earlier this year.

    We must speak out against offshore fracking or oil companies will be allowed to continue dumping an alarming 9 billion gallons of chemical-laden wastewater into our ocean each year. These chemicals have been identified by scientists as among the most toxic to aquatic life -- killing fish and harming sea otters -- and they can harm people too.

    Urge Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to protect our oceans and ban offshore fracking.

  • Tell Amazon to Shine With Rooftop Solar
    Amazon Shine

    Amazon.com is named after a unique and threatened ecosystem that's charmed and inspired us all, yet the land and climate footprint of the company's operations pose a serious threat to biodiversity worldwide. That's why the Center for Biological Diversity has launched its new Amazon Shine campaign, urging the company to install solar panels on its huge warehouses.

    Amazon's fulfillment centers are some of the largest in the world, taking up more than 70 million square feet of space in the United States alone -- and that's not counting the land and climate impacts of powering these buildings. The entire process requires the mass extraction and transport of fossil fuels, as well as the generation and transmission of electricity over long distances.

    As a powerful, growing company, Amazon has the responsibility to consider wildlife in its decisions -- from siting future buildings to minimize wildlife impacts to meeting as much of its energy needs from rooftop solar panels as possible.

    By putting solar panels on top of its warehouses, Amazon can help lead the way toward an energy future that's better for wildlife, people and the planet. It'll also make it easier for others to follow suit.

    Amazon has responded to similar petitions before -- for instance, by committing to power its web services with 100 percent renewable energy. So join us now in asking Amazon to shine by installing solar panels on its U.S. warehouses.   

  • Protect Our Pollinators
    Pollinators
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    Worth billions of dollars economically and so much more in inherent value, pollinators like birds, bats, bees, butterflies and beetles are responsible for much of our food and many of our beautiful spring flowers. But tragically they're also being poisoned by our overuse of toxic pesticides.

    The Environmental Protection Agency has just released a report finally acknowledging that neonicotinoids may be harming bees. But the report is deeply flawed, looking only at impacts of neonics on honeybees and entirely ignoring their impacts on more than 4,000 species of native bees, not to mention birds, bats, butterflies and beetles. 

    The EPA needs to fix its report to address these impacts. Even more importantly, it must act to protect our pollinators from dangerous pesticides. 

    Take action below -- urge the EPA to address the deficiencies in its original risk assessment and give our pollinators the close look they need to survive.

  • Protect California's Drinking Water From Toxic Oil Waste
    Pumpjack

    California state oil regulators recently asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to exempt a San Luis Obispo aquifer from protection under the Safe Drinking Water Act in order to use it as a dumping ground for toxic oil waste.

    This outrageous move would allow the oil industry to contaminate an underground water source with dangerous chemicals. In the midst of a devastating drought, polluting our precious water is unacceptable.

    We know that many similar applications across the state are waiting on the outcome of this application, which will set a precedent for the security of all other aquifers in California.

    If the EPA approves the exemption, California's precious aquifers will become trash dumps for the oil industry. This decision has a potential impact on water for thousands of communities across California.

    EPA Region 9 is considering the fate of California's water right now, and that's why they need to hear from you. Join us to demand they deny Big Oil's application to pollute.

  • A New Path to Save Oak Flat
    Save Oak Flat

    For centuries Apache people have held religious and coming-of-age ceremonies at Oak Flat, a sacred site in central Arizona's wild, beautiful and juniper-flecked Tonto National Forest. That's why the area was formally withdrawn from all mining 60 years ago by President Eisenhower.

    Yet in December 2014 Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) led an effort to trade this sacred land away to international mining giant Rio Tinto in a midnight rider on a defense bill. This political double-dealing was an egregious betrayal of the Apache people and all other Americans who value public lands for what they are, not the profits they can produce for foreign corporations.

    Thankfully Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) has introduced a bill to repeal the Oak Flat giveaway, S.B. 2242. This follows on the heels of a similar bill introduced last year by Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), H.R. 2811.

    Now's the time to urge your senators to cosponsor S.B. 2242 and repeal the Oak Flat land swap. Together these bills offer an exciting pathway to save a precious place.

  • Pennsylvania's Timber Rattlers Need Your Help
    Timber rattlesnake

    Timber rattlesnakes are slowly disappearing across the country, and in many states they're nearing extinction. But in the mountains of Pennsylvania these fascinating rattlers have found a sanctuary, thanks in part to state laws that protect them as a "candidate species" at risk of becoming threatened or endangered.

    Unfortunately the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, the agency responsible for looking after rare and vulnerable reptiles, proposes to remove this protective status without starting a conservation and monitoring program. That's like sending a patient hobbling out of a hospital with a pat on the back and "good luck."

    These snakes deserve better. If they're to survive, they need protected habitat for essential behaviors such as basking in the sun, foraging for food and hibernating during cold winters. And because of the way they live -- in groups and sharing the same dens, year after year -- this haven is even more important.

    Removing protections now will leave these snakes and their homes open to obliteration -- by oil and gas companies waiting to drill and by people who aim to kill the snakes based on the mistaken belief that they're a threat.

    Take action below -- tell the Fish and Boat Commission that now is not the time to give up on timber rattlesnake recovery.

  • I Stand with El Jefe, America's Only Wild Jaguar
    El Jefe

    Recent video shows the only known wild jaguar in the United States in his natural habitat in southern Arizona, where he's been living for more than three years. The stunning footage, captured on remote-sensor cameras, gained national attention for this beautiful cat, named El Jefe by Tucson school kids.

    Many people aren't aware that El Jefe's home is threatened by a massive open-pit copper mine. The proposed Rosemont Mine would blast a mile-wide hole in the ground thousands of feet deep and bury thousands of acres of public land under 800-foot-high piles of toxic mine waste, right in the middle of El Jefe's home territory.

    And the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service -- the agency tasked with protecting and preserving endangered species in the United States -- just gave its approval for this mine project. Documents show that this horrifying decision flies in the face of what the Service's own scientists recommend. It is part of a distressingly familiar pattern of the Service caving to political pressure at the expense of our native wildlife.

    Take action -- let Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe know that the decision to allow the destruction of El Jefe's home is unacceptable.

  • Tell Gov. Kate Brown: Oregon's Wolves Deserved Better
    Gray wolf pup
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    In November 2015 the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission, ignoring comments from 25 scientists, removed wolves from the state's endangered species list. The Center for Biological Diversity and allies then filed a lawsuit to challenge this decision. Our suit simply requests a judicial review to determine if the commission acted legally. We don't believe it did.

    In an attempt to dodge our lawsuit, Republican legislators representing a handful of ranchers and hunters who want to halt wolf recovery in Oregon introduced House Bill 4040. The bill passed both chambers of the legislature and was just signed by Gov. Kate Brown. By signing this bill, Gov. Brown has signaled that it's OK with her to impede a judicial review of the decision to remove protections from wolves and to set a dangerous precedent of allowing politicians to meddle with species conservation.

    Using the form below, please write the governor to tell her you're extremely disappointed that she signed H.B. 4040 into law. We encourage you to customize the letter -- and it will greatly increase your impact if you can also call Gov. Brown at (503) 378-4582, referring to our letter for talking points.

  • Keep Protections Strong for Manatees
    Manatee
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    Ignoring ongoing threats, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to downlist Florida manatees from "endangered" to "threatened." Although manatees have returned from the brink of extinction, they continue to be cut down by boats and killed by red tide and other pathogens -- and are also facing critical habitat degradation. It's too soon to reduce protections for these endangered animals.

    In making its premature proposal, the Service used a computer model based on incomplete data that failed to take into account recent massive manatee die-offs. And the Service has no plan for reducing boat collisions or addressing habitat loss. Manatees' natural warm-water refuges are diminishing, and the man-made warm-water refuges on which the majority of manatees have come to rely are facing imminent closure.

    Let the Service know that manatees still need our help. Send a letter below -- and join us at the public hearing in Orlando on Saturday, Feb. 20, from 3 to 6 p.m. in the Great Hall of the Buena Vista Palace Conference Center, 1900 Buena Vista Drive, in Orlando. RSVP to Jacki Lopez.

  • Halt Fracking on Public Lands in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas
    Fracked water
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    On April 20 the Bureau of Land Management is planning to auction off federal oil and gas leases that would allow dangerous new fracking on 36,000 acres of public land in Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

    We can't let that happen -- the costs to our water supplies and climate are just too high.

    Some of the parcels up for auction lie directly beneath water sources that serve major cities like Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston. A single failed well or groundwater mishap could spell disaster, contaminating drinking water for millions of people and putting wildlife in harm's way. 

    Burning these publicly owned fossil fuels is also terrible policy, of course. This oil and gas should be considered unburnable in the context of international climate goals.

    Take action below -- help us stop this auction and keep these fossil fuels in the ground.

  • Save Alaska's Ancient Trees
    Tongass National Forest
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    Anyone who's spent time in an old-growth forest knows what it means to stand in awe -- of time and mass on another scale, life in a different hue.

    That's why we must save one of America's most prized national treasures -- southeast Alaska's Tongass National Forest -- from a host of feller bunchers, harvesters, skidders and other forestry equipment waiting to turn these temperate rainforest trees into boards and pulp.

    Along with climate change, habitat destruction is putting the Tongass in peril, as well as the bears, salmon and rare Alexander Archipelago wolves who call it home. And a new plan from the Forest Service falls well short of fixing these problems -- instead of ending old-growth logging now, the agency proposes to let it go on for 15 more years.

    Join us in asking for an immediate end to old-growth logging in the Tongass and a better plan to protect the wildlife habitat and carbon-rich forests of southeast Alaska.

  • Stop Cruel Gassing of Texas Wildlife
    Western diamondback rattlesnake

    The Center for Biological Diversity and local partners have urged Texas state officials to ban gassing, a barbarous hunting technique used to drive snakes out of their underground shelters. Hunters pour gasoline into snake dens and capture snakes that emerge seeking fresh air.

    Gassing is already banned in dozens of states, including all the states bordering Texas, for good reason: Underground dens offer important shelter to hundreds of species, including foxes, lizards, birds and invertebrates. In Texas 20 endangered species living underground can be harmed by suffocating gas fumes.

    Only with your support can we convince Texas wildlife officials to stop the cruel and unnecessary practice of using noxious chemicals to hunt wildlife.

    Please -- add your name to our petition today.

  • Help Nevada Get Back on Track for Rooftop Solar
    Solar panel
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    Nevada's public utility commission just approved new anti-solar rules that hit consumers with added fees and slashed bill credit for the valuable and wildlife-friendly solar power they send to the state utility NV Energy.

    That means that families and small businesses with rooftop solar are seeing their investments vanish. Hundreds of people employed by the state's growing solar sector are already, or will soon be, out of work. And solar is now out of reach for many Nevadans who dreamed of one day harnessing the sun for their own power, and to protect wildlife from large-scale solar arrays.
     
    In short, this order props up the state's powerful existing utilities but does nothing to get Nevada any closer to a sustainable, clean-energy future.

    Tell the state's public utility commission to right this wrong and put Nevada back on track for rooftop solar.

  • Tell Senator Heinrich to Stand With Wolves
    Gray wolf
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    Having failed to attach a wolf-killing "rider" onto December's massive end-of-year government-funding bill, the enemies of wolves have tacked the provision onto a bill that's largely intended to ensure access to public lands for lawful hunting and fishing. The bill's new section would remove wolves from the endangered species list in Wyoming, Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and portions of other midwestern states.

    Federal law calls for taking animals off the protected list only when science determines they no longer face extinction throughout the significant parts of their range. Wolves haven't yet met that threshold. If Congress bypasses the Endangered Species Act by stripping wolves' protection prematurely, hundreds of wolves will be killed -- further imperiling the existence of this beautiful, intelligent and social mammal.

    New Mexico’s U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich, an original sponsor of Senate Bill 405, the "Bipartisan Sportsmen's Act of 2016," supports science-based wildlife recovery. Now that his bill has been commandeered by anti-wolf zealots, he should withdraw his sponsorship.

    Please ask Sen. Heinrich to drop his support of S.B. 405 until the wolf-killing provision is removed.

  • Stop GMO Grass From Spreading Across Oregon
    Creeping bentgrass
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    Almost 15 years ago, Scotts and Monsanto petitioned the U.S. Department of Agriculture to allow the commercial sale of creeping bentgrass that was made for golf courses and genetically engineered to withstand heavy doses of Roundup pesticide. But a catastrophe occurred and the companies were forced to pull their petition and do damage control.

    Today they're back with the same petition and the same request.

    The catastrophe that derailed the first attempt was the escape of GE bentgrass into the pristine Crooked River National Grassland in Oregon. Scotts and Monsanto are still trying to control the problem, even as it continues to spread.

    If the USDA grants this request, it would remove a major hurdle for the commercial sale of this GE grass, threatening to displace native plants and wildlife wherever it's sold.

    Urge the USDA to tell Scotts and Monsanto that they have to take responsibility for their mistakes, clean up their mess and destroy this creation once and for all.

  • Stop the Coup That Would Ruin California's Coast
    Big Sur, California
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    A behind-the-scenes effort to oust the California Coastal Commission's Executive Director Dr. Charles Lester has just come to light. That's why we must band together and defend this important wildlife advocate.

    The attack on Dr. Lester is an attack on the one of the state's most powerful environmental laws, the Coastal Act of 1976, which the commission is bound to enforce. Pro-development members looking for a way around this law have decided they must remove Dr. Lester first.

    Tell the California Coastal Commission that you stand with Executive Director Dr. Lester and want to see our coasts protected for future generations.

    And if you can, join us for a hearing on Feb. 10 in Morro Bay. The commission will discuss Lester's possible termination, which is why we must show up and defend his record to protect wildlife.

  • Help Ban Fracking in Our National Wildlife Refuges
    Kenai brown bear
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    National wildlife refuges provide critical rest stops for migratory birds, are strongholds for imperiled plants and wildlife, and keep millions of acres of wetlands pristine. Unfortunately when some refuges were created the government wasn't able to purchase the oil, gas and other fossil fuels beneath the land. Drilling in these wildlife refuges has destroyed habitat, caused toxic spills, water and air pollution and wildlife deaths.

    More than 5,000 oil and gas wells now exist in 107 refuges, and at least 32 more are at risk for future extraction, including via fracking. They include Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in California, Delta National Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana and many refuges in North Dakota's Bakken region.

    These places are simply too important to sacrifice to the fossil fuel industry, whose environmental record on these lands is galling.

    Help protect our national wildlife refuges by calling on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to ban fracking on lands vital to migratory birds and wildlife. 

  • Protect Oregon's Rivers From Scofflaw Miners
    Suction dredging
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    Suction dredge mining in Oregon has increased dramatically over the past several years, and continues to this day though it's now illegal. This form of hobby mining peppers rivers and streams with platoon-like rafts, each equipped with a motor and hose used to suck up gravel from the stream bottom. Flecks of gold are then sorted out, and the remaining sediment is flushed back into the stream. 

    The harms of this kind of mining are well documented. Suction dredging degrades critical habitat for imperiled wildlife like salmon, as well as other highly sensitive frogs and fish. In the process it muddies waters and stirs up toxic plumes of mercury.

    A new bill before the state legislature would help enforce the existing five-year moratorium on suction dredging in salmon habitat and develop stronger rules to protect Oregon's natural heritage and cover the costs of any illegal dredging that does occur. It's an important step, but what we need is a permanent ban.

    Please urge your state representatives to protect our nationally renowned rivers, streams and drinking water from this destructive mining practice.

  • Stop the Slaughter of New Hampshire's Bobcats
    Bobcat
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    New Hampshire has protected bobcats since 1989, after decades of hunting and trapping caused the state's population to plummet to only 200 animals. But if the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department gets its way, hunters and trappers could once again target these beautiful cats, which have only begun to rebound.

    Under the department's newly adopted rules, hunters would be allowed to use bait and hounds to go after bobcats. And trappers would be able to litter our forests with hundreds of indiscriminate traps that could hurt or kill endangered Canada lynx.

    New Hampshire's legislative oversight committee can stop these rules from going into effect. Take action below -- tell the committe you don't want bobcats cruelly hunted and trapped.

    And if you can, speak up for bobcats at the rule hearing on April 1. It'll take place at 9 a.m. at the Legislative Office Building (Rooms 306 & 308), 33 N. State Street in Concord.

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  • Oregon Standoff AA
    Western meadowlark at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge
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  • President Obama: Keep Your Climate Promise
    Polar bears
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    Just six months ago, the oil industry -- with the support of the Obama administration -- seemed unstoppable as it pushed for new offshore drilling projects in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. But things have changed quickly.

    Fighting in court and in the streets, the Center and allies helped pressure Shell and StatOil to end their Arctic drilling ambitions. The U.S. government cancelled two planned Arctic lease sales. And on the East Coast, dozens of town councils passed resolutions aggressively opposed to Atlantic drilling. 

    Now's the time to build on this momentum: Tell Obama to end all new federal oil and gas leases, starting with a permanent ban on drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic.

    At the Paris climate talks, the United States and 195 other countries recommitted to the goal of limiting global temperature increases to no more than 2 degrees Celsius, as well as efforts to keep that increase to 1.5 degrees. That means leaving the majority of fossil fuel reserves safely in the ground. Among the best places for the United States to begin is offshore, keeping 61.5 billion tons of carbon emissions out of our atmosphere.

    So please -- take a moment to urge the U.S. government to align its climate goals and energy policies by declaring the Arctic and Atlantic oceans off-limits to drilling. 

  • Help Tennessee Protect Its Mountains From Big Coal
    Green salamander
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    Tennessee's Cumberland Mountains region is one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth, and it's home to many species the Center is working to protect, including the green salamander, Cumberland dusky salamander, Big South Fork crayfish, ashy darter and many freshwater mussels.

    That's why your help is so urgently needed right now -- to take advantage of a unique opportunity to permanently protect this special region from the looming threat of surface coal mining.

    The state of Tennessee has petitioned the U.S. Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement to designate more than 67,000 acres of the tops of the Cumberlands as "lands unsuitable for mining." But Big Coal wants to keep blasting away, of course, and polluting downstream waterways.

    Take action below -- lend your support to Tennessee's visionary action and help protect this area for the many rare and fascinating creatures that call it home.

  • Help Us Halt Fracking Leases on Pristine Colorado Lands
    Thompson Divide, Colorado
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    In the 1990s and early 2000s, the Bureau of Land Management began illegally issuing fracking leases in Colorado with no environmental analysis, no roadless protections and no consultation with experts at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    As a result, some of the state's most sensitive and valued public lands are now at risk. The Thompson Divide is the site of illegal oil and gas leases -- and it contains vast swaths of aspen forest, unspoiled wildlife habitat and watersheds for major tributaries of the Colorado River.

    Fortunately, the Obama administration has released a draft plan that would wholly or partially cancel 25 of those 65 illegal fracking leases -- but that's not good enough.

    Urge the BLM to cancel all of the leases and keep these fossil fuels in the ground.

  • Stop the Slaughter of Nebraska's Rare Cougars
    Mountain lion

    Hunters and trappers exterminated Nebraska's cougars over a century ago, but these remarkable survivors have begun returning to the state. If the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission gets its way, sport hunters targeting these rare cats will prevent any further recovery.

    Contrary to the views expressed by groups wanting to eliminate predators from the landscape, sport hunting is not necessary to protect livestock. Only one incident of a cougar attacking a calf has been reported in Nebraska, and state law already allows killing of any cougar that threatens people or livestock.

    These beautiful wild cats need your help to recover within the state.

    Tell your elected officials to support Legislative Bill 961, which would end the issuing of permits for cougar trophy hunting.

  • Help Ban Fracking in Our National Parks
    Grand Tetons
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    National parks are the crown jewels of America's public lands system. But when certain parks were created, the government wasn't able to also purchase the oil, gas and other fossil fuels located beneath the land.

    That's why there are currently 12 national park units with active oil and gas operations, and another 30 are at risk for future extraction, including via fracking. They include treasures like Florida's Big Cypress National Preserve (where rare panthers find refuge from encroaching urbanization), Everglades National Park in Florida, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area in Utah, the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, Dinosaur National Monument in Colorado and Utah, Aztec Ruins National Monument in New Mexico, Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas and many more.

    These places are simply too important to sacrifice to the fossil fuel industry.

    Help us protect our natural treasures by banning any future non-federal oil and gas development on lands administered by the National Park Service.

  • Tell Obama: Declare Climate Emergency, Ban Oil Exports
    President Obama

    Following the signing of the historic Paris Agreement, President Obama has a chance to take real climate action by declaring a "national emergency" and banning all U.S crude oil exports. More than 350 environmental, social-justice, health and faith organizations have urged him to do just that. Now you can join them.

    As global temperatures hit record highs, climate change is unquestionably a national emergency. In fact, it's a "global emergency," according to renowned climate scientist Dr. Jim Hansen.

    The president must halt crude exports to give America -- and the world -- a fighting chance to meet the Paris Agreement's crucial goals of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Halting U.S. oil exports could prevent up to 500 million tons of greenhouse emissions -- the pollution equivalent of more than 135 coal-fired power plants -- from entering our atmosphere. Stopping these exports would also curb the dangerous U.S. fracking boom.

    Last December, less than a week after agreeing to the Paris climate accord, President Obama signed an omnibus bill lifting a 40-year-old ban on crude oil exports. This was a grave mistake, even if the bill was "must pass." But fortunately there's still a way forward: President Obama can declare a national emergency and prohibit exports for a one-year period, which can be renewed indefinitely.

    Please sign our petition calling on the president to declare a climate emergency, reinstate the ban on crude oil exports, and keep fossil fuels in the ground.

  • Get Neurotoxins Out of Our Food
    Watermelons
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    Once used in chemical warfare, organophosphate pesticides are now sprayed on the fruits, vegetables and grains that we eat, ranging from watermelons to lettuce leaves. These pesticides are toxic to humans and other animals, just as they are to insects, their intended targets.

    Organophosphate poisoning has resulted in the death of more than 335,000 birds in North America. And those are just the deaths that have been documented and we know about.

    It doesn't have to be this way. Organophosphates are not compatible with sustainable food production, nor are they necessary for high crop yields. They're simply a relic of the past, a reminder of what happens when the unthinkable becomes the new normal.

    The EPA has the power to change this, but it needs public pressure to do the right thing. Urge the agency to make good on its promise to phase out these toxic pesticides.

  • Tell the Senate and President to Protect the Oil Export Ban
    Fracking illustration
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    America's decades-old crude oil export ban is under urgent threat of repeal through backroom dealing and an imminent vote on a congressional spending bill. The ban is a critical safeguard against climate change and the damages and risks of fracking.

    Lifting the ban would massively boost oil production at a time when the science demands that we must leave at least 80 percent of remaining fossil fuels in the ground. The combustion of the additional oil that would be produced is estimated to generate more than 515 million metric tons of carbon pollution per year -- the equivalent annual greenhouse gas emissions of 135 coal-fired power plants or more than 100 million passenger cars.

    If this horrendous bill passes, communities across America will face more pollution, illness and disruption from drilling and fracking. We can't afford to lift the crude oil export ban just to contribute to Big Oil's windfall profits.

    Phone calls to your senators and the White House are urgently needed. Here are some talking points. Type in your ZIP code below to get your senators' numbers, then let us know you called.

    For senators:

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______. I'm calling to urge you to vote NO on the omnibus bill that repeals the crude oil export ban. Lifting the ban would increase oil production and damage from fracking and other dangerous drilling while undercutting progress fighting climate change. It will increase Big Oil's profits at our expense. No deal could justify lifting the 40-year-old crude oil export ban.

    Please -- vote against any bill that lifts the crude oil export ban or has other sneak attacks on our environment and democracy.

    Can you tell me how Senator X plans to vote? Thank you.


    For the White House:

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______. I'm calling to urge you to veto the omnibus bill that repeals the crude oil export ban. Lifting the ban would increase oil production and damage from fracking and other dangerous drilling while undercutting progress fighting climate change. It will increase Big Oil's profits at our expense. No deal could justify lifting the 40-year-old crude oil export ban.

    Please veto any bill that lifts the crude oil export ban or has other sneak attacks on our environment and democracy.

  • Stop the Biggest Oil Train Terminal in North America
    Oil train
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    Following the Paris climate talks, oil companies' proposals for massive expansions of fossil fuel infrastructure appear cynical and decidedly tone-deaf. One company, Tesoro-Savage, wants to ramp up transport of Canadian tar sands and North Dakota crude by building a $190 million rail complex at Washington's Port of Vancouver.

    The port would process 360,000 barrels of oil per day, or nearly half of what the entire Keystone XL pipeline would have carried. And these newly unearthed fossil fuels? They would be sold and burned, deepening the global climate crisis.

    And the likelihood of an accident is no idle threat: In the past three years there have been 11 oil train derailments in North America, resulting in damaging spills and deadly explosions. Tesoro's project is expected to result in a derailment every two years.

    Take action below -- urge Washington's energy officials to deny this dangerous proposal.

  • Coal Mining in Roadless Forests? Not in Colorado
    Bulldozer
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    The dangerous disconnect between the Obama administration's climate rhetoric and its actions on fossil fuel leasing just got worse.

    If the U.S. Forest Service has its way, it'll OK a loophole within the Colorado Roadless Rule and open 19,000 acres of backcountry to coal mining. The result? 130 million tons of new carbon pollution.

    Arch Coal, the nation's second-largest coal company, is the beneficiary of the plan. It would get to build 65 miles of roads in otherwise-protected forest in western Colorado. The losers in the plan are goshawks, elk, beaver and other wildlife whose habitat would be destroyed. And then us, of course -- some of our last, best public lands would suffer from the mining and eventual burning of this dirty fossil fuel.
     
    Take action below -- demand that the Forest Service withdraw this dangerous plan and protect this beautiful Colorado backcountry.

  • Tell Congress: Don't Sell Out Wolves, Environment in Budget Deal
    Gray wolves

    In recent years it's become increasingly common for certain Republicans to attempt to pass controversial, anti-environment provisions by attaching them to must-pass bills that fund our government. These attempts are sneaky and undemocratic. Policies that would never pass on their own as bills, and which have no basis in science and couldn't hold water in court, are becoming laws -- with devastating consequences.

    Attached to this year’s Interior spending bill are more than 100 policy riders: 17 would weaken or remove protections for endangered species, including gray wolves, and another would incentivize a fracking boom by lifting a crude oil export ban.

    Please call your senators today and urge them to push for a clean budget, no backroom dealings. You can leave your message with the receptionist or at the office's voicemail.

    Here's a sample call script. Type in your ZIP code below to get your senators' phone numbers, then let us know you called.

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______.  I’m calling to urge you to oppose the more than 100 anti-environment policy riders attached to this year’s Interior appropriations bill. These riders have nothing to do with our nation’s budget and are a shameful attempt to undermine science, democracy and environmental laws.

    Please -- do not cut any deal that would remove protections from gray wolves, lift the crude oil export ban, undermine the Endangered Species Act, or endanger our air and water. Thank you.

  • Howl for Wolves' Full Return to California
    Shasta pack wolves
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    Following decades of extermination programs at the behest of hunters and the livestock industry, wolves are finally starting to return to California after an 87-year absence. But irrational fears and dirty politics still abound -- which is why the state's new wolf conservation plan must be fiercely protective of wolves for as long as possible, lest the state backslide into the ways of last century.

    To its credit, the draft wolf plan recently released by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife does emphasize nonlethal strategies to prevent livestock conflicts, as well as the importance of outreach and education to promote coexistence with wolves.
     
    That's why it's disturbing to read, in the same plan, proposals to strip wolves of all state Endangered Species Act protections when they reach just 50-75 animals; to obtain authority to kill wolves even while they are on the state endangered species list; and to kill bears, coyotes and eventually wolves to boost elk and deer numbers. This is not yet the plan that will achieve the full recovery that the department's own scientists have shown is possible -- with nearly 500 wolves able to be supported in Northern California alone, and more in the central Sierra Nevada.

    Urge the department to protect wolves until they fully recover. And if you can, join the Center's West Coast Wolf Organizer Amaroq Weiss at one of three public meetings in Yreka (Jan. 21), Long Beach (Jan. 26) and Sacramento (Feb. 1).

  • Protect Lake Superior Watershed From Toxic Mine
    Superior National Forest
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    The proposed PolyMet sulfide copper mine poses a major threat to the wetlands, waters and wildlife of the Superior National Forest in northeast Minnesota. PolyMet seeks to construct an open-pit mine that would operate for 20 years and then require mechanical water treatment "indefinitely." Yet the company and regulatory agencies have not disclosed a plan for how PolyMet could possibly ensure adequate funding for centuries of water treatment, monitoring, maintenance and mitigation. 

    The mine would generate a staggering 15 million tons of waste rock every year, totaling over 300 million tons. Polluted tailings would be added to an existing taconite tailings basin that's already known to leak toxic chemicals. And both the mountain of waste rock and tailings basin would leach pollution into nearby groundwater, wetlands and streams on their way to Lake Superior.

    The proposed mine would also destroy or indirectly harm thousands of acres of high quality wetlands, as well as habitat for northern long-eared bats, lynx and wolves.

    The Forest Service knows this project isn't even allowed on the Superior National Forest. But instead of protecting this area, the agency has proposed a land swap with the mining company -- effectively giving away 6,000 acres of public lands and acting as if the area's environmental protections do not exist.
     
    Take action below -- urge your state and federal officials to reject PolyMet's mine proposal.

  • Keep Fracking Out of Florida
    Alligator
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    Through dozens of city and county resolutions, the people of Florida have spoken loud and clear: We do not want oil and gas companies taking over our land, destroying our ecosystems and crushing efforts to protect ourselves from fracking.

    Fracking is an inherently dangerous activity that contaminates huge amounts of water, jeopardizes public safety, contributes to global warming and destroys wildlife habitat. Industry-friendly regulations won't protect us or our priceless natural resources; you can count on that. 

    Oil companies already have their eyes set on fracking Florida's Everglades, the largest subtropical wilderness left in the lower 48. It would only take one spill to spoil this home for dozens of imperiled wildlife. A single accident would also deal a serious blow to tourism as well as the source of drinking water for one in three Floridians.

    Unfortunately we can expect a relentless push from oil and gas companies for access to drill and frack. That's why our only hope is in a permanent ban.

    Take action below -- urge state Sen. Charlie Dean and state Rep. Steve Crisafulli to introduce S.B. 166 and H.B. 19, respectively, to the committees they chair. These two bills will bring Florida one crucial step closer to a statewide fracking ban.

  • Save the Kentucky Arrow Darter
    Kentucky arrow darter
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    In the mountains of eastern Kentucky, an unexpectedly beautiful fish needs you to speak up for its protection.

    The Kentucky arrow darter lives in small Appalachian streams under high threat from surface coal mining, and Big Coal doesn't want to see this little fish gain an ounce of protection, lest it disrupt business as usual.

    The darter has already been completely lost from 36 of 74 known sites, with 16 extirpations having taken place since the mid-1990s as mountaintop-removal coal mining expanded. The pollution that's killing these fish also continues to plague the people who live downstream.

    Urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to finalize Endangered Species Act protection for the Kentucky arrow darter. You can help protect this fish from extinction and restore clean water to a region gripped by coal.

  • Defend Joshua Tree From Massive Dewatering
    Joshua tree
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    Home to desert tortoises, bighorn sheep and numerous rare and imperiled plants, Southern California's Joshua Tree National Park is a biological gem. The park is now threatened unfortunately by a water-pumping scheme that will draw down ancient groundwater and leave wildlife out to dry -- all to fuel urban growth.

    The Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Project, now permitted by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, would pump more than 9 billion gallons from the
    aquifer. It took thousands of years to collect and store that water, and in a single generation much of it could be lost.

    The National Park Service and its parent agency Department of the Interior must protect the park from this ill-conceived project at all costs.

    Demand that these agencies defend this national treasure by challenging FERC's flawed environmental review in court.

  • Tell USDA to Stop Retaliating Against Its Own Scientists
    Soybean seeds
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    Disturbing reports from U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists reveal that the agency is suppressing research on the dangers of pesticides and retaliating against them when their studies reveal unfavorable facts about these chemicals.

    Indeed, when public interest in Jonathan Lundgren's work grew -- work that's shown neonicotinoid pesticides are killing monarchs and don't even provide tangible benefits to farmers -- USDA began to seriously harass the senior scientist, eventually forcing him to file a federal whistleblower complaint.

    Widely used on crops such as corn and soybeans, neonicotinoids have quickly become the most commonly used insecticides in the United States and are a major source of revenue for the multibillion-dollar pesticide industry, despite the overwhelming body of science linking them to declining pollinator populations. By suppressing its own scientists, USDA has shown that it's more interested in protecting these powerful industry interests than the integrity of American agriculture.

    We need be able to trust USDA to properly regulate our food supply. Take action below -- demand a full investigation and the restoration of scientific integrity at USDA.

  • Stop Oil Trains in the Northwest
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    In the wake of Keystone XL's rejection, oil companies anxious to reroute their toxic assets have set their sights on pushing crude by rail through the Pacific Northwest.

    One plan aims to build two new crude terminals in Washington state's Grays Harbor, but the issue is far from local. The plan would endanger hundreds of communities along the rail routes, which is why we need your help to stop it now.

    We've seen how risks can quickly turn to tragedy: In the past three years there have been 11 oil train accidents in North America, including one in Quebec in 2013 that killed 47 people. Before that there was the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska and the Nestucca spill off Grays Harbor, both in 1989, that contaminated beaches and ravaged ocean wildlife.

    The science is clear, and now it's time for us to make ourselves heard: The only safe home for these fossil fuels is in the ground. Urge the Washington Department of Ecology and city of Hoquiam to reject the proposed oil terminals.

  • Stop Zoo Imports of Wild African Elephants
    Swaziland elephant
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    To the dismay of conservationists around the world, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced plans to import 18 wild elephants from the Kingdom of Swaziland for permanent placement in American zoos.

    The southern African country only has 39 elephants in all -- so the proposal will cut the nation's elephant population by nearly half.

    Confining wild elephants that have naturally huge home ranges simply isn't conservation. A better move for the United States would be to help close the ivory market as quickly as possible, expand habitat protections, and increase anti-poaching personnel and equipment.

    Take action below -- urge the Service to retract its plan to import wild elephants for American zoos.

  • Ban New Offshore Drilling on the West Coast
    Platform Holly in Southern California
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    Surfing, sea otters, sunbathing, whale-watching, soaring squadrons of pelicans -- and sticky oil slicks. These are all features of Southern California's sandy beaches, but we don't think the last item belongs on the list. Let's take it off for future generations by permanently banning new offshore oil and gas leases.

    Offshore oil platforms have been part of the West Coast for too long, polluting the waters and coating the beaches in sticky goo with sickening regularity. Surprisingly, the coastal areas off California, Oregon and Washington are still available for federal oil leases. Oil drilling deepens our climate crisis and imperils wildlife.

    Let's stop offshore drilling now and forever by passing the West Coast Ocean Protection Act, which would ban new oil and gas leases on a coastline valued by locals and tourists from around the world.

    "Keep It the Ground" has become the mantra of a new generation of citizens concerned about the climate and carbon pollution, and this is an important first step in that process -- so let your representatives know how you feel.

  • Help the Hellbender!
    Hellbender salamander
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    Ozark National Scenic Riverways was the United States' first federally protected national river, and it's home to a key population of endangered Ozark hellbenders. These unique creatures, North America's largest amphibians, are imperiled even in protected areas like the Riverways.

    Mismanagement of recreational activities like ATV use and horseback riding has contributed to the decline of these aquatic salamanders, which are protected under the Endangered Species Act. Ozark hellbenders need good water quality and serve as a barometer for the health of the freshwater ecosystems where they live. Trails that cross or are adjacent to rivers damage the hellbenders' habitat through erosion and an influx of sediment, and the huge numbers of horseback rides in the Riverways have contaminated the rivers with horse waste.

    The National Park Service has just begun a process to create a new "Roads and Trails Management Plan" for the Riverways.

    Now's your chance to let the Service know it must prioritize the protection and recovery of Ozark hellbenders in its plan.

  • Stop New Highway Through Red Cliffs National Conservation Area
    Desert tortoise
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    Southwest Utah's unique desert tortoises have declined precipitously because of development in recent decades. That's why in 1996 the Red Cliffs Preserve was established as part of the Washington County Habitat Conservation Plan -- to set aside 61,000 acres of habitat for imperiled species like desert tortoises; create space for activities like hiking and horseback riding; and protect stunning red-rock views.

    In 2009, however, a large chunk of that protected area was carved out by legislative fiat and handed over to developers -- and now Congress wants to ram a four-lane highway right through the heart of the remaining 44,000-acre preserve.

    We can't let this happen. The Bureau of Land Management recently proposed a plan for Red Cliffs NCA with the preferred management being no new roads, highways or transmission lines. Congress should not be legislating public land management and cutting us out of the process.

    Please help save Red Cliffs National Conservation Area from this attack by writing to the BLM and your congressional delegation. Tell them to oppose this outrageous bill.

  • Tell the Mauritian Government: Stop the Bat Kill
    Mauritius fruit bat
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    With large, round eyes and a wingspan stretching two and a half feet, Mauritius fruit bats (aka flying foxes) are huge and hugely adorable. They also play a key role in their ecosystem as pollinators and seed dispersers -- which is why we need your help to stop a major threat to their survival.

    The Mauritian government is planning a massive cull that will wipe out 18,000 of these bats, or roughly 20 percent of the entire population. The kill is planned during the bats' breeding season and will cruelly leave orphaned young to starve -- all to "protect" lychee fruit growers.

    Bat experts with the International Union for Conservation of Nature have expressed serious concerns about the killing, and many conservationists fear the cull will threaten this already vulnerable species with extinction.

    Urge the Mauritian government to reverse its kill order and keep this bat from going the way of the dodo.

  • Tell Sen. Klobuchar: Don't Mess With Wolf Recovery
    Minnesota wolf
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    Congressional efforts are now underway to reach a budget agreement to fund the government for the next year. Unfortunately, removing federal protections for wolves may very well be the price the Republican-led Congress demands to keep the government running after Dec. 11.

    We need you to deliver an important message to Sen. Amy Klobuchar: Reject any budget deal that includes removing federal protections from wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes region.

    If this policy rider is included, it will likely lead to a widespread wolf slaughter -- killing that could include more trophy hunts and cruel traps. We can't let such riders become law.

    Deciding when to remove Endangered Species Act protections is not the role of politicians, and these bills would set a dangerous precedent and weaken this bedrock environmental law. Wolves would lose the Act's lifesaving protections for no reason other than being unpopular with special interests and extremists. During this critical time, it's essential that Sen. Klobuchar hears from you.
     
    Take action below -- write or call Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) to speak up against the wolf riders and any other attempts to undermine the science and integrity of the Endangered Species Act during the budget negotiations process.

  • Protect the Ban: No Crude Oil Exports
    Fracking illustration
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    A critical safeguard against climate change and the public-safety risks associated with fracking, America's decades-old crude oil export ban is now under attack. Earlier this year, the House voted to lift the ban. Now Republican congressmen need just a few more Democratic votes to ram the legislation through.

    Lifting the ban would be a huge mistake: It would massively boost oil production at a time when the latest climate science and reports on the wildlife extinction crisis demand that we leave as much of those fossil fuels in the ground as possible.

    Specifically the combustion of all that newly fracked oil is estimated to generate more than 515 million metric tons of carbon pollution per year -- the equivalent annual greenhouse gas emissions of 135 coal-fired power plants or more than 100 million passenger cars.  

    Take action below -- urge Congress to oppose overturning the crude oil export ban and stand up to Big Oil, whose only stake in the matter is its own profit.

  • Tell Congress to Save Oak Flat
    Save Oak Flat protest
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    Oak Flat in central Arizona is sacred land to the San Carlos Apache tribe, but Congress traded it away last year to facilitate a huge copper mine for international mining giant Rio Tinto.

    You can help save Oak Flat with a single phone call. Urge your representative to cosponsor H.R. 2811, a bill to repeal the Oak Flat giveaway. You can leave your message with the receptionist or at the office's voicemail after hours. Just remember to be quick and polite -- and to include your name and where you're from.

    Here's a sample call script. Type in your ZIP code to get your representative's phone number, then let us know you called.

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______. I'm calling to urge you to cosponsor H.R. 2811, a bill to repeal the Oak Flat land exchange. I care deeply about our public lands and wildlife, and I was outraged when Oak Flat was traded away to a foreign mining company last December in a midnight rider. This land is sacred to Apache people and has very high wildlife and recreational value. Congress should never have made this rotten deal in the first place. Please help repeal the land exchange as soon as possible.

  • Tell U.S. Climate Negotiators to Back Airplane Pollution Cuts
    Airplane
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    If commercial aviation were considered a country, it would rank seventh after Germany in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. So why is this sky-high source of planet-warming pollution getting a free pass at international climate talks?

    Ahead of this year's Paris climate summit, negotiators from the United States and other nations have been crafting a document that will form the basis for a final global treaty. Aviation and shipping have been addressed in that text since early on. But the latest version turns responsibility for these sources' pollution over to industry-friendly regulators -- the International Civil Aviation Organization and the International Maritime Organization.

    That would be disastrous. In the past 18 years, the aviation organization has not adopted any measure to curb aircraft-induced global warming. And the maritime organization has rejected any need to cap shipping emissions.

    The Obama administration's climate negotiators must strongly and publicly support international efforts to truly address aviation and shipping pollution in the Paris agreement.

    Take action below. Tell Todd Stern, the State Department's special envoy for climate change, to back strong international measures to curb greenhouse pollution from airplanes and ships.

  • Stop Urban Sprawl Near Joshua Tree
    Desert tortoise
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    In Southern California, a zombie project killed off once before is staggering upright again. We need your help to shut it down for good. The proposal: To build a new city just south of Joshua Tree National Park. The leapfrog housing development would sprawl across 5,000 acres and sit dozens of miles from the nearest towns in the Coachella Valley.  

    The mega-development would also pave over existing habitat for rare plants and animals, including desert tortoises and bighorn sheep. And it would destroy a huge ephemeral wash with rare small-leaved trees that has provided crucial habitat for migratory birds in this arid landscape since the Pleistocene.

    The planners' absurdly named "Paradise Valley" is the epitome of poorly sited sprawl development in a landscape already short on water and quickly warming and drying due to climate change.

    Please do your part to preserve this irreplaceable desert locale by writing to Riverside County and expressing your opposition to this proposed new town.

  • Demand Warning Labels in California for Cancer-causing Meats
    #MeatKills

    After evaluating more than 800 scientific studies, the World Health Organization has concluded that processed meats like bacon, sausage and ham are known to be carcinogenic to humans, classifying these meats alongside cigarettes and asbestos. The WHO also classified red meat as a probable carcinogen.

    Meat production -- particularly of red and processed meat -- is also a known hazard to the environment, responsible for massive amounts of greenhouse gas emissions, toxic pollution and habitat loss for threatened and endangered species.

    Now that the verdict is in, these dangerous meats must be labeled under California's Proposition 65, which requires warnings on all products containing known carcinogens. The powerful meat industry is gearing up to fight this classification, of course, out of fear that informed consumers will choose to eat less meat if they know their health is at stake. Help us fight back.

    Urge California's health officials to require labels for processed and red meats linked with cancer. As California goes, so goes the nation ... with your help.

  • Help Ensure Washington's Wild Future
    Washington wildlife collage
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    Wildlife agencies in many states have long managed animals as a resource for consumption or a nuisance to be contended with. But the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is now seeking input on other ways to move forward.

    The prospect is exciting, but at least one major hurdle lies ahead. The agency's operating budget is overwhelmingly funded by hunters, trappers and anglers. This has meant that some species have been allowed to thrive while others have become targets for killing.

    This is no way to manage a public trust.

    The department is calling this comment opportunity "Washington's Wild Future: A Partnership for Fish and Wildlife." Let's show the agency what a real partnership looks like.

    Take action below -- tell the agency you want wildlife to be conserved for future generations, based on science and an appreciation for their intrinsic value. Let it know that its budget should come from sources that don't compromise its public trust obligation. And if you can, personalize your note.

  • Wolves Under Attack -- Tell Obama to Use His Veto
    Gray wolf
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    It's no secret that some politicians cater to special-industry interests and have no respect for established precedent, science or federal laws. Through the use of unrelated policy riders tacked onto must-pass spending bills, House and Senate Republicans have repeatedly shown that they're not above trying to undermine wildlife protections through closed-door tactics. 

    President Obama has repeatedly threatened to veto legislation that rolls back environmental protections. Now's your chance to urge him to make good on his word by using his veto power to reject all riders negatively targeting wolves in the Department of Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill.

    The president must choose science over politics and set a precedent against any future attempts to strip wildlife protections through such bills.

    Take action below -- urge President Obama to keep a hawk's eye on the Interior spending bill and use his veto until all toxic riders are cut.

  • Help Stop This Outrageous Project in the Arctic
    Polar bear
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    Just when we thought offshore drilling in the Arctic was done and we could breathe easy, along comes the so-called "Liberty" project off Alaska's coast. But with your help, we can stop this dangerous project before it threatens wildlife and lights the fuse on a 150-million-barrel carbon bomb.

    Polar bears and other threatened wildlife are having a hard enough time these days without expanding fossil fuel production in waters crucial to their survival. Offshore oil drilling is inherently dangerous, and an oil spill would be impossible to clean up in the Arctic Ocean.
     
    Before regulators consider allowing construction of this massive island of oil rigs, they need to hear from you.

    Urge the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management to reject this dangerous project and instead put us on a course toward the clean energy future we all need and want.

  • Save New Mexico's Last Free-flowing River

    Gila River, New Mexico Originating in America's first designated wilderness area, New Mexico's Gila River is an ecological treasure that deserves long-term protection. Its riparian forests are home to one of the highest concentrations of breeding birds in the country, and its waters teem with fish. A dammed and diverted Gila would mean significantly less water in the river -- a deadly blow to the area's outdoor economy and wildlife, and a story we’ve seen written across the Southwest too many times.

    After three previous failed attempts to dam and divert the Gila, the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission and local New Mexico CAP Entity are pushing forward with a Gila River diversion project yet again.

    But fortunately at least one major hurdle still lies ahead: The New Mexico CAP Entity and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell must sign off on an agreement by Nov. 23.

    Take action below -- sign our petition urging Secretary Jewell to save the Gila River by refusing to sign this agreement. The area's long-term water needs can be met by other proven means -- through conservation, groundwater management, water recycling and watershed restoration. 

  • End the Use of Toxic Flame Retardants in Household Items
    Car seat
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    Recent research has made some deeply troubling finds: Toxic flame retardants are pervasive in our homes, our bodies and the wild places that we love. These chemicals are associated with multiple adverse health effects, including reproductive and developmental problems, hormone disruption and cancer. Due to frequent hand-to-mouth contact, children are extremely vulnerable. 

    Flame retardants are designed to persist and some are in the same chemical class as DDT -- so the sooner we can rid our environment of these chemicals, the better.

    Following recent legislative action in California, many consumer products can now meet federal and state standards without the use of toxic flame retardants. Yet they are still pervasive in the products we buy.

    Make your voice heard -- tell the Consumer Product Safety Commission to ban the sale of products containing these unnecessary toxic chemicals.

  • Stop Bomb Trains in California
    Oil train
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    Right now is a critical moment to stop oil trains in California. Oil giant Valero wants to build a massive terminal for oil trains at its Benicia refinery.

    If Valero gets its way, mile-long oil trains carrying explosive and toxic crude will travel daily throughout California. The project's environmental review admits that impacts from hazardous materials will be "significant and unavoidable." The risks to health and safety are unacceptable.

    We also know that this project is a disaster for the climate. Building a new oil train terminal would lock us into decades of using some of the most carbon-intensive oil on the planet: Canadian tar sands and fracked North Dakota Bakken crude. At a time of extreme drought and intense heat waves, we need to invest in safe and clean energy projects.

    Take action below -- urge Benicia's planning department to protect our communities and say no to oil trains in California.

  • Say 'Shell No' to Oil Trains in the Northwest
    Oil train
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    Shell wants to bring mile-long trains full of highly toxic and explosive crude oil from Canada and North Dakota to its refinery in Washington state.

    Shell's refinery sits on the shore of Puget Sound, with the Padilla Bay National Estuarine Reserve next door. The oil train project could have devastating impacts to nearby wildlife and sensitive ecosystems, but the issue is far from local. This project would endanger hundreds of communities along the rail routes through North Dakota, Montana, Idaho and Washington.

    Local elected officials and decision-makers need to know the truth about the impacts before they decide. Shell will try to keep the analysis quick and simple. Your voice will help counter that pressure and make sure a full environmental review is done.

    Speak up and voice your concerns about bringing more oil trains and tankers into the Pacific Northwest.

  • Demand Greener Menus From World's Largest Restaurant Company
    Olive Garden sign

    Darden Restaurants owns and operates more than 1,500 restaurants -- including Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse and Bahama Breeze. Through these restaurants the company employs more than 150,000 people and serves more than 320 million meals a year, making it the world's #1 full-service restaurant operator.

    As a leading food provider, Darden has a unique opportunity and responsibility to use its considerable purchasing power to support a healthier, fairer and more sustainable food system.

    Sign our petition urging Darden to adopt greener menus to promote public health and protect wildlife. With a company this large, the effects of every food choice are magnified.

  • Push for Lifesaving ESA Protections for 17 Species
    Wood turtle
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    We face a profound extinction crisis. With threats like habitat destruction, toxic pesticides and climate change, we're losing animals at up to 10,000 times the historic extinction rate.

    That's why the Center for Biological Diversity is working to get our nation's rarest animals protected under the Endangered Species Act. In petitions to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, our scientists gather data on downward population spirals and document the threats to their survival.

    In a win for more than a dozen species, our petitions have garnered a response from the Service to consider whether eight salamanders, a turtle, three snakes, two lizards, two birds and a minnow deserve federal protection.

    But that protection isn't yet secured. We need your help to do it.

    We can save all 17 of these animals -- from the orange-throated wood turtle, which stomps its front feet to cause earthworm prey to surface, to the lesser slender salamander -- usually just over 1 inch long.

    Take action below -- urge the Service to move quickly to protect these rare animals. And if you want to make an even bigger difference, directly submit your own comments on petitioned animals living near you. 

  • Save Puerto Rico Wetlands From Trash Incinerator
    Puerto Rican parrot
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    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is considering subsidizing a massive incinerator that would burn more than 700,000 tons of trash per year and pollute Caño Tiburones -- Puerto Rico's largest wetland and a biodiversity hotspot.

    But let there be no mistake: Burning city waste won't make problems disappear. The incinerator would release dangerous chemicals -- including dioxins, furans, lead and mercury -- into the surrounding air, soil and water. And the area's local residents and 21 federally protected species will be harmed by the plant's blow-away trash, 24/7 operations, 400 daily tons of toxic ash, thousands of dropoff trucks and proposed floodplain modifications.

    Take action below -- tell the USDA we should be supporting green technology, not burning trash piles. The agency must deny this proposal, which would threaten the health of Puerto Rico's people and wildlife. 

  • Tell Department of Justice: Prosecute Volkswagen's Climate Criminals

    Corporate wrongdoing comes in many forms. What Volkswagen did by cheating on smog-pollution tests is a crime against us all -- those who rely on clean air to breathe today and future generations who deserve a livable planet.

    Volkswagen's deception allowed the greenhouse gas equivalent of at least 32.2 million tons of extra carbon pollution to be released into the atmosphere, roughly the same as the emissions of 6.8 million cars.

    Volkswagen knew what it was doing and did it anyway. The punishment for this kind of violation of public trust has to match the magnitude the impacts will have on people, the environment and our climate.

    Take action below -- tell the U.S. Department of Justice to prosecute those responsible at Volkswagen to the fullest extent of the law.

    And by our calculations, the financial penalties for Volkswagen's environmental violations ought to be at least $25.1 billion -- not the $18 billion that's been discussed so far. (That doesn't include additional potential penalties related to recalls, consumer payments and other factors not related to environmental damage.)

    The punishment needs to fit the crime -- and it has to send a signal to other corporations that they can't cheat current and future generations out of clean air and a livable climate.

  • Stop the Destructive Delta Tunnels
    Chinook salmon
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    California has a long history of oversubscribing its fresh water for human use, and the resulting harms from this mismanagement are glaring: Many salmon runs and other native fish populations in the Sacramento River and Bay-Delta are near collapse.

    But while scientists are calling for increasing flows through the delta to help recover imperiled fish runs, Gov. Brown and state and federal agencies are promoting the opposite: moving forward with the infamous Delta Tunnels project.

    The so-called "California WaterFix" would build massive water diversion tunnels, secure the current overpumping of the delta and create the largest transfer of public wealth to private resources in state history. Taxpayers will bear the costs of the estimated $60 billion project. And despite the propaganda, the project won't produce more water, create more reliable supplies or help wildlife. The project ignores alternatives such as water efficiency, recycling and groundwater recharge.

    Take action below -- help us stop this transparent water grab. Tell the state and federal agencies involved that you oppose the Delta Tunnels plan. 

  • Tell Gov. Inslee to Protect Our Cougars
    Cougar
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    Stealthy, solitary and highly adaptable, mountain lions are incredible survivors. But even so, they're unlikely to escape the killing campaign Washington wildlife officials have in store for them -- unless we speak up.

    At its April meeting, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission voted to increase cougar hunting quotas by a staggering 50 percent in several key areas, catering to special interests who want to eliminate predators from the landscape.

    But a 13-year study in the state has shown that hunting at these aggressive rates will actually tilt the cougar population toward younger males, who are more likely to engage in livestock conflicts than animals in stable, older populations.

    Although commission members admit this vote was made without public notice and are unable to point to any science to support an increase in hunting rates, the commission has rejected our petition to overturn its decision.

    Take action below -- join our appeal to Gov. Inslee to reverse the commission's decision and reinstate last year's science-based quotas. 

  • No More Toxic Pesticides in Minneapolis Parks
    Minneapolis sculpture garden

    The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board has an integrated pest-management plan that has occasionally found ways to use natural pest control. But the city's strategy still heavily relies on the use of toxic fungicides, herbicides and insectides -- a policy that flies in the face of the best science and carries huge risk.

    Pesticide exposure is associated with numerous health threats, especially to children, pregnant women and the elderly. And pesticides can harm nontarget wildlife, pets and beneficial insects like bees. For example, rodenticides used to control moles also kill foxes and raptors that would naturally control these rodents. And poisons applied to plants can seep into groundwater or get washed directly into local waterways and ponds.

    Urge the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to adopt a pesticide-free management policy that's safe for people and wildlife.

  • Protect California's Deserts With New National Monuments
    Mount San Gorgonio, California
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    Rugged, awe-inspiring and soon hopefully protected. Join Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) in calling on President Obama to use his powers under the Antiquities Act to establish three new national monuments in California's deserts.

    The Mojave Trails National Monument would link Joshua Tree National Park, Mojave National Preserve and 13 wilderness areas. Just two hours from Southern California's dense city centers, the monument would provide a refuge for explorers and a chance to see dark night skies, wide-open vistas, wildflowers, and a variety of wildlife.

    The Sand to Snow National Monument would rise from the Sonoran Desert floor up to Mount San Gorgonio at 11,503 feet. The area's home to the headwaters of two of Southern California's lifegiving rivers, the Santa Ana and Whitewater. And many landscape influences -- montane, desert and coastal -- converge here to make the area a living laboratory for evolution and a hotspot for biological diversity.

    The Castle Mountains National Monument, at 29,000 acres, would conserve the missing piece in the northern part of the Mojave National Preserve. The Castle Mountains were originally left out of the national preserve when it was established because of a large gold mine, but the area has since been reclaimed. The area is home to Joshua tree forests and unique desert grasslands. 

    Take action below -- urge President Obama to establish these monuments today.

  • The World's Deadliest Bycatch
    Sperm whale
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    Americans consume more than 5 billion pounds of seafood a year, and roughly 90 percent is imported -- so how that seafood is caught matters. For the more than 650,000 whales, dolphins and other marine mammals unintentionally caught and killed in fishing gear around the world each year, the matter is life and death.

    In 1972 Congress passed the Marine Mammal Protection Act, limiting the number of whales and dolphins U.S. fishermen may catch and requiring them to reduce that number to zero. But Congress also required other nations to meet those standards or lose access to the U.S. market.

    Yet for decades the United States has ignored that law and turned a blind eye to seafood imports with flagrant legal violations -- until now. Following a legal settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. government is finally stepping up to enforce the law.

    Take action below -- urge the National Marine Fisheries Service to quickly finalize its rule to protect marine mammals. The rule can stop tens of thousands of whales and dolphins from dying in nets each year and pull imperiled marine species back from the brink of extinction.

  • Keep Oregon's Wolves Protected
    Oregon wolves
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    After 60 years without its historic top predator, Oregon's first known wolf wandered in from Idaho in 1999, and in 2008 a breeding pair was confirmed in the state. It's only been seven years since then -- yet the state is already considering removing wolf protections.

    Please join us in telling the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission that wolf recovery is nowhere near complete. 

    Oregon wolves occupy just 12 percent of the habitat deemed suitable by the state, and most of those wolves live in the northeast region, where wolves are already less protected due to certain provisions in the state wolf plan. Those wolves are the source population for wolves to spread to the rest of Oregon. So if they lose protections now, recovery across the state is doomed.

    Take action below -- tell your state wildlife officials to keep wolves protected.

  • Calling Local Red Wolf Allies: We Need Your Howl

    Red wolf The Center for Biological Diversity and allies are pushing back against the few vocal, special-interest groups in North Carolina who want to see the red wolf go extinct. If they get their way, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will terminate its recovery efforts rather than listen to the thousands of other citizens and scientists who strongly support keeping the program alive.

    Red wolves were first reintroduced into the wild in 1987 at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. And today a free-ranging population of 50 to 75 wolves inhabits about 1.7 million acres of federal, private and state lands in northeast North Carolina, making the recovery program a success so far.

    While there's still work to be done to properly restore populations, it will be impossible without the commitment of the Service, which has noted it will only move forward with support from local landowners in the recovery area.

    Take action below--- sign our letter to the Service showing your support for keeping red wolves on federal, state and private lands. This remarkable recovery program is not yet done.

  • End Cruel Trapping on Wildlife Refuges
    Canada lynx

    With 563 areas designated, the U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System encompasses an incredible collection of habitats that are home to more than 240 endangered species -- from lynx and wolves to a host of rare and fascinating plants and critters.

    But unbelievably, while these refuges should be a safe haven, trapping is still allowed in more than half of these federally protected lands.

    Jawed traps continue to slam shut with bone-crushing force. Snares continue to fatally tighten around animals' necks. And many nontarget species are also getting hurt or killed. It's time to confront the painfully obvious: Traps don't belong in refuges.

    Urge your representative and senators in Congress to step up and cosponsor the Refuge From Cruel Trapping Act -- legislation that would at last end trapping in our wildlife refuges.

  • Keep Oregon's Wildlife Safe With Science
    Oregon wildlife
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    The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission makes decisions and sets policies that can literally determine the destiny, or fate, of the state's magnificent range of wildlife. So who gets appointed this fall by Gov. Kate Brown will make all the difference.

    If Chair Michael Finley and Commissioner Holly Akenson (the commission's only biologists) are replaced by people favored by the livestock, sporthunting and extractive industries, the balance within the seven-member body could be upset -- with potentially dire consquences for the state's vulnerable wildlife, such as wolves.

    Decisions about Oregon's natural resources should be made by a commission that represents the broad interests in the state, including wildlife-viewers, hikers, scientists and educators -- not just those with a financial stake.

    Take action below -- urge Gov. Kate Brown to reappoint Chair Finley and Commissioner Akenson, whose unique expertise will keep Oregon's wildlife policies rightly grounded in science.

  • Wolves Under Attack -- Tell Obama to Use His Veto
    Gray wolf
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    It's no secret that some politicians cater to special-industry interests and have no respect for established precedent, science or federal laws. Through the use of unrelated policy riders tacked onto must-pass spending bills, House and Senate Republicans have repeatedly shown that they're not above trying to undermine wildlife protections through closed-door tactics. 

    President Obama has repeatedly threatened to veto legislation that rolls back environmental protections. Now's your chance to urge him to make good on his word by using his veto power to reject all riders negatively targeting wolves in the Department of Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill.

    The president must choose science over politics and set a precedent against any future attempts to strip wildlife protections through such bills.

    Take action below -- urge President Obama to keep a hawk's eye on the Interior spending bill and use his veto until all toxic riders are cut.

  • Revoke the Army Corps' License to Kill Cormorants
    Double-crested cormorant

    Making the right calls for conservation isn't always easy. But when thousands of animals' lives are on the line, those calls better be right.

    That's why we must demand the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service revoke its permit for the U.S. Army Corps to kill more than 10,000 double-crested cormorants and destroy more than 26,000 cormorant nests on East Sand Island, near the mouth of the Columbia River. The government agencies are scapegoating these native birds for declines of imperiled salmon and steelhead -- but the real problem is mismanagement of the area's dams, which are disrupting fish runs.

    A recently released document shows that the Service's own biologists found that fish eaten by the birds would have died anyway, consumed by other predators. It makes no sense, then, to kill cormorants. Doing so will not help endangered fish.

    Urge the Service to revoke its kill permit and save these cormorants. Their population in the West is already down to less than 10 percent of historic levels due to drought, climate change and human control.

  • End Mining Within 100 Feet of Streams
    Kentucky stream
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    For decades legal loopholes have allowed coal companies to mine directly through streams, harming imperiled species like the Colorado pikeminnow and eastern hellbender salamander, and poisoning downstream waterways for people.

    But at last the federal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement has proposed a new Stream Buffer Zone Rule that would restrict all mining within 100 feet of streams. While the rules would make it harder for mining to occur near most waterways, we have to make sure an even stricter buffer is applied and all loopholes are sewed shut.

    Your comments could make a real difference, convincing regulators not to bow to pressure from an industry bent on tearing up the Earth.

    Take action below -- urge this agency to adopt the strongest rule possible to ensure protection for our waterways and endangered wildlife.

    And if you can, attend one of the upcoming public hearings to show your support for increased stream protections. Hearings will take place in Colorado (Sept. 1), Kentucky (Sept. 3), Missouri (Sept. 10), Pennsylvania (Sept. 10), Virginia (Sept. 15) and West Virginia (Sept. 17).

  • Big Trucks Need Big Carbon Cuts
    Highway trucks
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    The EPA and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are currently proposing standards for big trucks to limit greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. These standards would save truck drivers at the pump and eliminate the need for nearly 1 million barrels of oil every two days.

    But while they sound impressive, the proposed standards would do little more than maintain current emissions levels, as miles driven will continue to increase even as vehicles become more efficient. This is unacceptable. The International Council on Clean Transportation has shown that 30 percent greater reductions are within reach.
     
    The government must also seriously reconsider what's under the hood of trucks with natural gas engines. The current standards give them a free pass, but the science tells us that switching from diesel to natural gas will incentivize dangerous fracking and undermine steps to address the climate crisis.

    Take action below -- urge our government regulators to enact strong truck standards to reduce climate pollution and toxic air pollutants emitted when burning fuel. These benefits are needed by all, but will be greatest for vulnerable communities that are located near highways and industrialized zones.

  • Only Two Days to Save Alaska's Island Wolves
    Alexander Archipelago wolf
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    Last month Alaska's state scientists announced some disturbing news: In a single year, the Alexander Archipelago wolf population on Prince of Wales Island had been cut in half -- down to 89, and very likely less. Researchers were unable to document reproduction in the island population, a sign it's headed for extinction.

    Prince of Wales is the third-largest island in the United States and a hotspot for genetic uniqueness. But unfortunately the island's rich, old-growth forests have been, and continue to be, heavily logged -- a practice that destroys habitat for the wolves' primary prey, Sitka black-tailed deer, making it harder for both species to survive. Logging also brings roads, increasing access for wolf hunters and trappers.

    Although old-growth logging is the main problem, wolf numbers are now so low that management agencies must shut down the hunting and trapping season altogether to prevent the loss of all the island's wolves.

    Take action below -- demand that the Federal Subsistence Board close this season's Alexander Archipelago wolf hunt on Prince of Wales Island.

    ***Comments are due by Thursday.***

  • Support This Major Move Forward for Manatees
    Manatee in Kings Bay, Florida
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    It's easy to see why people are so drawn to Florida's large, lovable manatees. But in crowding this endangered mammal's winter refuge at Three Sisters Springs in Kings Bay, we're loving them to death.

    Without unhindered access to the area's lifesaving warm waters, manatees are subject to potentially lethal cold-stress syndrome. They shouldn't have to negotiate a tourist frenzy when what they need is to rest peacefully.

    It's long past time to bring these practices to a stop, especially since there are so many other places for swimmers and visitors within Kings Bay to passively observe and admire manatees.

    Take action below -- let the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service know you support its proposal to close all in-water access to the springs during manatee season, and to provide limited in-water experiences to passively observe these remarkable animals.

  • Tell Obama: Our Public Lands and Climate Aren't for Sale
    Oil rig on Wyoming public land

    The Center for Biological Diversity has launched a groundbreaking campaign to end all new fossil fuel leasing on America's public lands, and now we need your help to drum up support and help break the flow of business as usual.

    Under his "all of the above" energy policy, President Obama has already leased nearly 15 million acres of public land and 21 million acres of ocean to the fossil fuel industry. And, in total, more than 67 million U.S. acres -- an area 55 times larger than Grand Canyon National Park -- are now leased to the fossil fuel industry.

    But importantly, those fossil fuels that haven't yet been leased contain up to 450 billion tons of potential climate pollution. That's about half of the world's remaining carbon budget to keep warming below 2 degrees Celsius, and virtually all of the remaining budget for staying below 1.5 degrees. We simply can't burn it -- and if we can't burn it, it should be banned.

    Sign our petition urging President Obama to step up as a true climate leader and stop new fossil fuel leasing on America's public lands and waters.

  • No Time Like Now to Save Orcas
    Orca

    In early 2015 the National Marine Fisheries Service rightly concluded that, to keep Puget Sound's killer whales from forever disappearing, it was absolutely necessary to protect coastal areas off Washington, Oregon and Northern California under the Endangered Species Act.

    But then, in an about-face, the agency postponed a final rule protecting this habitat until 2018 or beyond. The agency says it needs to gather more information, but scientists say there's plenty: Observations and satellite tracking show that the Southern Resident population of 81 orcas uses and needs these foraging grounds.

    Meanwhile the threats continue all along the orcas' migration route, down to the San Francisco Bay and beyond: Fast-moving maritime traffic, coastal pollution, ocean noise, fishing gear entanglements and food supply depletion could all be minimized by new rules.

    Take action below -- urge the Fisheries Service to end its delays. Species with critical habitat protection are twice as likely to be on the path to recovery as those without.

  • 35 Herps Up for Lifesaving Protections -- Take Action
    Alligator snapping turtle

    With threats like habitat destruction, toxic pesticides and climate change, amphibians and reptiles are dying off at up to 10,000 times the historic extinction rate. This loss is especially alarming because frogs, salamanders and snakes play important roles as predators and prey, and are key indicators of ecosystem health.

    That's why the Center for Biological Diversity filed a 2012 petition -- the largest of its kind in history -- seeking protection for dozens of our nation's rarest herpetofauna. In response to our petition, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now considering whether 35 of these "herps" deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act.

    With your help we can save the alligator snapping turtle -- the largest freshwater turtle in North America -- and the inch-long Illinois chorus frog, as well as dozens of other species. 

    Urge the Service to move quickly to protect these rare amphibians and reptiles.

  • Protect Californians From Toxic Atrazine
    Farm workers
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    So dangerous it's been banned by the European Union since 2004, atrazine nevertheless remains on the U.S market as the second most widely used agricultural pesticide.  

    Fortunately a healthier future may soon be within reach: California has finally proposed to list atrazine under Proposition 65, a law which requires the state's businesses to warn citizens of unsafe exposures to toxins.

    There's just one big hitch: The threshold the state proposes is too high to do much good for California's farmworkers who are chronically exposed to these chemicals or our kids who are particularly sensitive. The state's numbers are also flawed, based on a 20-year-old unpublished study by the pesticide's manufacturer.

    Take action below -- urge California's health officials to use only the best science to protect people and wildlife from this dangerous pesticide.

  • Give Polar Bears a Stronger Recovery Plan
    Polar bear
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    Instead of throwing polar bears a lifeline, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last month proposed a weak recovery plan that allows for a massive 85 percent drop in the polar bear population and accepts a disturbingly high likelihood that the species may go extinct. We need your help to tell the Service this isn't good enough.

    While the "recovery" plan recognizes that climate change threatens to wipe out a majority of the world's polar bears, it proposes no meaningful measures to combat this threat. Scientists predict that most bears will likely be gone by 2050 unless there are massive cuts in the greenhouse gas pollution melting their sea-ice home.

    To make matters worse, the Obama administration's Interior Department recently permitted Shell's oil rigs to begin drilling in polar bear habitat in Alaska's Chukchi Sea, heightening the risk of oil spills and committing us to more ice-melting pollution.

    Take action below -- tell the Service polar bears deserve a strong recovery plan that confronts their key threats, and that oil drilling off Alaska is incompatible with polar bear recovery.

  • Help Make Joshua Tree Whole Again
    Joshua tree
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    In the late 1940s a southeastern chunk of what was then Joshua Tree National Monument was turned over to industry to develop an iron mine. But now that the mine's been closed since the 1980s, Joshua Tree National Park officials are exploring the possibility of reclaiming the site -- to make the park whole again.

    We need your help to show strong public support for this proposal. This incredible landscape at the convergence of Southern California's Colorado and Mojave deserts is brimming with diverse plants and animals, cultural sites, geologic wonders, dark night skies -- and, of course, those twisted and beautiful Joshua trees.

    It's also been continually under threat from a series of ill-conceived projects -- including proposals for a giant trash dump, a prison and now a devastating water-storage project -- even though the original withdrawal legislation for the mine required that, upon closure, lands be returned to the monument.

    Act now to tell the Park Service you support its proposal to restore Joshua Tree's original 1936 boundaries -- a big win for people and wildlife alike.

  • Expect More. Bag Less.
    Plastic bags in tree
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    Plastic shopping bags in the United States require 12 million barrels of oil to manufacture, account for thousands of pounds of litter along the coasts and are responsible for the deaths of millions of seabirds and marine animals every year. Despite this, they're in almost every American home because retail giants like Target continue to use them.

    In recent years Target has positioned itself as a company that cares about sustainability, with eco-friendly product branding and other efforts to green its stores. Yet it continues to send shoppers home with single-use plastic bags that take ages to break down and end up threatening sea turtles, birds and other wildlife.

    That's why it's so important that we hold Target responsible for its carbon footprint and plastic waste, which amounts to more than a billion plastic bags every year.

    Take action below -- demand an end to single-use plastic bags in Target stores to fight climate change and protect wildlife. Other retailers and cities have successfully reduced their waste by eliminating plastic bags, making it easier to use reusable bags and rethinking how they bag purchases. It's time for Target to step up. 

  • New Restrictions Proposed on Ivory Trade -- Take Action
    African elephant
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    A landmark 2014 study has confirmed the horrifying reports from Africa: In just three years more than 100,000 elephants were slaughtered to feed a growing demand for their ivory, now worth more per pound than gold. The good news is that the Obama administration has stepped up with a new set of proposed rules to address the problem.

    Legal domestic markets for ivory provide cover for illegal ivory from poached elephants, so halting demand for  ivory products in the United States is crucial to saving elephants in Africa. That's why the Obama administration has proposed new regulations to virtually eliminate ivory sales across state lines.

    The new rules are a much-needed step for elephant conservation, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service could do even more. Genetic evidence shows there are actually two species of elephants in Africa -- forest and savannah elephants -- both on the path to extinction.

    Take action below -- urge the Service to protect both elephant species as "endangered" under the Endangered Species Act and make it clear that imperiled species aren't for sale.

  • Tell EPA to Protect All Bees From Toxic Pesticides
    Honeybee
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    The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a new rule to create temporary "pesticide-free zones" when commercial honeybees are trucked in to pollinate cash crops during blooming seasons. The rule begs the question: Why not protect all bees from a known threat if the chemicals are so "acutely toxic"? 

    While an undeniable reprieve for those hired bees, the rule would do nothing to protect native bumblebees and solitary bees across the nation. The rule also applies only to the spraying of leaves -- just part of the problem.

    More than 100 million U.S. acres are planted with seeds, such as corn and soybean seeds, drenched in bee-killing chemicals. This rule does nothing to protect pollinators from the harms of these systemic toxins, which make entire plants poisonous, including the pollen and nectar.

    Take action below -- urge the EPA to revise its rule to protect all bees, not just commercial hives, and regulate toxic pesticides applied to seeds as well as leaves.

  • Show Your Support for Right Whales
    North Atlantic right whales
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    The northeast coast of Florida hosts the only known calving grounds of the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), and it's home to spectacular deepwater banks of ivory tree coral (Oculina varicosa) that support a vast array of marine wildlife, including more than 350 invertebrate species.

    That's why it's so exciting that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is considering designating Eubalaena Oculina National Marine Sanctuary. This area is like no other, and protecting it would be good news for all marine wildlife -- not just the whales and corals for which the sanctuary would be named.

    There's just one big hitch: The area is also being pursued by oil and gas companies eager to survey and drill for its buried fossil fuels.

    Take action below -- urge NOAA to designate Eubalaena Oculina National Marine Sanctuary and ensure the survival of the area's rare and stunning species.

  • Tell the EPA to Save Monarch Butterflies
    Monarch butterflies
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    Monarch butterflies need our help. These once-common backyard beauties have dwindled by an astounding 90 percent in just the past 20 years.

    A leading cause of their decline is the widespread use of glyphosate (aka Monsanto's Roundup), which is specifically designed to kill more than 200 kinds of broadleaf plants and grasses -- including milkweed, the monarch caterpillar's only host plant. More than 300 million pounds of glyphosate are sprayed in the United States every year, decimating milkweed throughout the monarch's range.

    Thanks to the tireless efforts of the Center and our allies, the Environmental Protection Agency is now seeking public input on how to keep these iconic butterflies from disappearing.

    Take action below -- tell EPA that the solution is clear. To protect monarchs the agency must curtail the out-of-control use of glyphosate and other deadly pesticides. 

  • Save Oak Flat From Arizona Copper Mine

    Save Oak Flat Oak Flat in central Arizona is sacred land to the San Carlos Apache tribe, but Congress traded it away last year to facilitate a huge copper mine for international mining giant Rio Tinto.

    The mine would destroy Oak Flat, where native people have held religious and coming-of-age ceremonies for generations, and leave behind a massive crater -- wiping out streams, springs and wildlife habitat.

    We need as many people as we can to speak out for Oak Flat and support important bills by Rep. Raúl Grijalva and Sen. Bernie Sanders to repeal the Oak Flat giveaway.

    Take action below -- join the Apache resistance by signing our pledge to save Oak Flat from this destructive copper mine.

  • Join the Apache Resistance Against Arizona Copper Mine
    Apache Leap, Arizona

    Stand with the San Carlos Apache tribe to protect Oak Flat, a sacred Apache site in the Tonto National Forest in central Arizona.

    International mining giant Rio Tinto's plans to develop a massive copper mine there would leave a depression in the ground the size of the Winslow meteor crater, drain the aquifer and destroy important streams, springs and wildlife habitat.

    The area was formally withdrawn from mining by presidential order 50 years ago, but Congress recently approved a land swap that allows the company to obtain private control of the land and evade environmental laws in the process.

    Please take a moment to urge Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to oppose this project.

  • Don't Let Big Oil Drill Big Cypress
    Florida panther
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    Big Cypress National Preserve plays a critical role in the health of the Everglades and Florida's coastal estuaries, and it's home to a stunning array of imperiled wildlife, from alligators and eastern indigo snakes to caracaras and panthers.

    A newly proposed project from a Texas oil company, however, threatens to irreversibly alter the character of the protected area and turn essential habitat into just another oil field crisscrossed with roads and dotted with drill pads. The company has asked for permission to begin seismic surveying -- which itself will require the removal of trees and destruction of habitat on 70,000 acres.

    Limited drilling is already permitted in the preserve, but this project is unprecedented in its scale and must be stopped. If oil and gas is found, all risks will mushroom.

    Take action below -- tell the Park Service you do not support widespread drilling in the preserve. And, if you can, personalize your note -- tell the agency what you value about this wild and natural area, even if it's somewhere you haven't yet visited. 

  • Save Oklahoma's Horned Lizards
    Texas horned lizard

    Texas horned lizards are formidable-looking creatures with prominent horns on their head and spines generously scattered over their back and sides. They can even eject blood from their eyes when threatened -- and yet these rare reptiles have no defense against their biggest threat: habitat destruction.

    Indeed horned lizards have undergone massive declines in Oklahoma and are rare across their range in the Midwest and Southwest. The loss of these lizards is alarming not only because of their intrinsic value but also because reptiles play important roles as predators and prey in their ecosystems and are valuable indicators of environmental health. That's why the Center petitioned the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation in December 2014 to protect the lizard under the state's endangered species law.

    More than six months have passed, though, and still no word from the state agency.

    Take action below -- urge the director of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation to protect the state's horned lizards before it's too late.

  • Protect Rare Wildlife From Post-fire Logging
    California Rim Fire
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    For thousands of years, fire has played an essential role in sustaining life within California's Sierra Nevada forests. And few species can tell that story as well as the rare black-backed woodpecker.

    Black-backeds are a keystone species because they're among the first birds to arrive on the post-fire scene and, unlike most birds, are capable of creating holes in the hard bark of the burned, dead trees. These holes, in which the woodpeckers nest and raise their young, are eventually used as shelter by many other birds and even small mammals. 

    Unfortunately the Forest Service recently issued a proposal to log much of this important and rare kind of habitat in the King fire area of the Eldorado National Forest. For a few bucks, this logging would disrupt the natural cycle of regrowth by removing the standing dead trees.

    Take action below -- urge the Forest Service to reconsider its stance on this issue and protect, not log, rare post-fire habitat on our public lands.

  • Keep Lynx Safe From Deadly Traps
    Lynx
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    One of the cardinal rules for hunters is never to shoot unless you know your target. And likewise, trappers should catch only the species they're targeting. When mistakes are made, the results can be devastating, as Maine learned this past winter when two threatened lynx were killed in traps set for fishers and martens.

    The grim outcome was entirely predictable: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had done a study showing the trap setup the state wanted was a glaring threat to lynx, and yet the agency gave in to the state's demands.

    Now that the state has proposed new rules to address the problem, we need your help to make sure lynx get nothing but the strongest protections they deserve.

    Take action below -- urge Maine's wildlife officials to revise and strengthen the state's trapping program to protect lynx and serve as a model for other states to follow.

  • Stop the Senseless Slaughter of Illinois Bobcats
    Bobcat
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    Bobcats are intelligent, beautiful animals that pose no threat to public safety, feed mostly on rabbits and rats, and in recent years have just begun to recover in Illinois following years of cruel hunting and a brush with extinction.

    Despite this Illinois lawmakers are dead set on reopening hunting and trapping seasons this fall, which have been banned in the state since 1972. Of course, people don't eat bobcats -- so they'd be killed solely for trophies or their fur.

    The only way to protect bobcats at this point is to convince Gov. Bruce Rauner to veto H.B. 352, recent legislation opening the bobcat hunting and trapping seasons. Unless he hears that the public is outraged, he's likely to sign this bill into law.

    Take action below -- tell Gov. Rauner how important wildlife and wild places are for the state. Then call him at (312) 814-2121 and urge him to protect bobcats by using his veto.

  • Tell President Obama to Tackle the Climate Crisis
    President Obama

    Time is running out to avoid the climate crisis. We need real action and we need it now.

    President Obama doesn't need to wait for Congress to act. He can use his power as commander-in-chief to address global warming, carbon pollution and biodiversity loss.

    Sign our petition urging the president to take these important five steps right now to begin saving our planet from climate catastrophe.

  • Wolves Under Attack -- Call Your Representative Now
    Gray wolves
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    It's no secret that some House Republicans cater to industry interests and have no respect for established precedent, science or federal statutes. But the political meddling we've seen in the past few months is unparalleled -- once again, funding legislation that the American public urgently needs is being held hostage by irrelevant, harmful riders helpful only to special interests.

    Tuesday's vote is your chance to tell the representative in your district to reject Section 121, Amendment No. 19 and any future attempts to legislatively strip protections from wolves through the Interior Department Appropriations Bill. Please call your representative before 12 p.m. EST on Tuesday, July 7 and urge him or her to vote no on these dangerous riders.

    You can leave your message with the receptionist or at the office's voicemail after hours. Just remember to be quick and polite -- and to include your name and where you're from.

    Here's a sample script for your call. Type in your ZIP code to get your representative's phone number.

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______. I'm calling to urge you to vote no on Section 121 and Amendment No. 19 in the Interior Department Appropriations Bill (H.R. 2822). I care deeply about protecting gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act. These anti-wolf riders have no place in a bill that's supposed to address our nation's budget. The riders will weaken protections for gray wolves and their recovery and undermine the Endangered Species Act. They are shameless acts that signal to special industry interests that they can circumvent the requirements of federal conservation laws whenever politically inconvenient.

  • Tell EPA to Protect All Bees From Toxic Pesticides
    Honeybee
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    The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a new rule to create temporary "pesticide-free zones" when commercial honeybees are trucked in to pollinate cash crops during blooming seasons. The rule begs the question: Why not protect all bees from a known threat if the chemicals are so "acutely toxic"? 

    While an undeniable reprieve for those hired bees, the rule would do nothing to protect native bumblebees and solitary bees across the nation. The rule also applies only to the spraying of leaves -- just part of the problem.

    More than 100 million U.S. acres are planted with seeds, such as corn and soybean seeds, drenched in bee-killing chemicals. This rule does nothing to protect pollinators from the harms of these systemic toxins, which make entire plants poisonous, including the pollen and nectar.

    Take action below -- urge the EPA to revise its rule to protect all bees, not just commercial hives, and regulate toxic pesticides applied to seeds as well as leaves.

  • Keep Whales Out of Crab Traps
    Humpback whale
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    In 2014 a record number of whales were entangled in fishing gear off the U.S. Pacific Coast, and this year initial rates are even higher. The unnecessary suffering and death are sickening -- which is why we need your help to demand that California's fishery managers enact immediate reforms to better protect wildlife.

    According to the National Marine Fisheries Service, there were 30 unique reports of whale entanglements in 2014 off the West Coast -- most of them gray or humpback whales caught in lines connected to crab traps. That's nearly twice the number from the previous year and several times more than in years past.

    The steep rise in entanglements is a clear sign that something is amiss and that measures taken so far by industry won't cut it.

    Take action today -- urge California's wildlife officials to protect our whales by reassessing and updating crab fishery practices to reduce entanglements.

  • Tell EPA: Cut Airplane Carbon Pollution
    Airpline contrail
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    The EPA recently determined that skyrocketing greenhouse pollution from airplanes hurts our climate and endangers human health. But instead of fighting this fast-growing threat, the agency wants to pass the buck to an international organization virtually run by the airline industry.

    If commercial aviation were considered a country, it would rank seventh after Germany in terms of carbon emissions -- and those emissions are projected to more than triple by 2050. That's an unacceptable threat to our climate.

    Yet the EPA plans to just sit back and wait for another authority to take action -- the International Civil Aviation Organization, which hasn't produced a single measure to curb aircraft-induced global warming in 18 years.

    The EPA has set climate standards for cars, trucks, buses and power plants -- now the agency must do the same for airplanes.

    Take action below -- urge the EPA to set airplane carbon rules now.

  • 135 Rare Hawaiian Species in Urgent Need of a Home
    Awikiwiki flower
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    With some of the world's most imperiled plants and animals facing escalating threats from our growing human footprint, climate change, pollution and habitat fragmentation, it should be obvious that to protect a species, we must also protect where it lives. But too often the agencies in charge of saving vanishing wildlife are skipping this step, which is explicitly required by the Endangered Species Act.

    In the Hawaiian islands collectively known as Maui Nui, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service now has a chance to make good on this past oversight by finalizing a rule that will grant critical habitat protections to 135 imperiled species all at once.

    Because the fate of so many species hangs in the balance, time is of the essence. But the Service must also get the designation right, because a policy misstep could spell mass extinction. The agency has noted that it can't recover these Hawaiian species "without the help and cooperation of non-federal landowners" -- and yet one move the Service is seriously considering is leaving state and private lands unprotected with hopes that voluntary plans will suffice. 

    Take action below -- urge the Service to give these 135 Maui Nui species protected habitat on all available lands -- protections that can be enforced and depended upon.

  • Tell EPA to Curb Toxic Soot Pollution
    Los Angeles smog
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    Several times smaller than the width of a hair and about 50 times smaller than a sand particle, toxic soot is nevertheless a serious public health threat. Precisely because of its size, soot can easily enter our lungs and bloodstream -- which is why Southern California's notoriously smoggy skies are such a problem.

    Toxic soot pollution comes from burning fossil fuels and has been linked to a number of health risks, including premature death, heart attacks, strokes and decreased lung function. That's why we need stronger protections under the Clean Air Act to improve air quality.

    In 2009, the EPA gave the South Coast Air Basin -- which includes much of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties -- six years to meet clean air standards. And yet just months before the deadline, the area is nowhere near meeting this goal. Southern Californians continue to inhale toxic soot. 

    Take action below -- urge the EPA to intervene and reclassify the South Coast Air Basin as noncompliant to protect the public health and wildlife of Southern California. 

  • Tell Our Reps: Don't Play Politics With Our Health and Environment
    Members of the House of Representatives are trying to gut environmental protections with budget riders-- don't let them.
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    Certain members of the House of Representatives have stuck more than 20 provisions into this year's budget that, if signed into law, will have devastating consequences on our environment.

    Funding legislation that the American public urgently needs should not be held hostage by irrelevant and harmful riders.

    These dangerous provisions could block efforts to fight climate change and weaken our most important environmental laws, including the Endangered Species Act -- and the bill also cuts the EPA's budget by nearly 10 percent.

    Interior Secretary Jewell has already denounced this horrible plan -- let's join her in urging the House to reject the bill until all nongermane and environmentally harmful language is removed.

  • Tell Ace and True Value to Stop Selling Bee-killing Pesticides
    Bumblebee
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    With study after study piling up, the science is clear on neonicotinoids: These pesticides are one of the leading causes of recent bee die-offs, and national retailers like Ace Hardware and True Value that continue to sell neonicotinoid-treated plants and seeds are peddling dangerous toxins.

    Research shows that even when neonics don't kill bees outright, they can make them more vulnerable to diseases and other stressors. Neonics are systemic insecticides, so all parts of plants treated with them are toxic to our pollinators, including the pollen.

    Recently, Ace expressed that it's "willing to move away" from selling these chemicals, but it has refused to commit to any concrete action as Lowe's Home Improvement, BJ's Wholesale Club and other garden retailers have done.

    Take action below -- tell Ace and True Value that they must remove all products with neonicotinoids from their shelves now.

  • Protect Grand Canyon From Uranium Mining

    Colorado River, Grand CanyonThe Grand Canyon is sacred to many Native American tribes and cherished by all Americans, but the Canadian company Energy Fuels is jeopardizing this national treasure by mining the area's uranium for private profit -- a move that threatens the canyon and its seeps and springs with permanent radiological contamination.

    In 2012, the Secretary of the Interior issued a 20-year ban on all new uranium claims around Grand Canyon National Park, but mines that opened prior to that decision were exempt from the rules. As a result, old mines continue to operate based on outdated permits and obsolete environmental reviews from more than 30 years ago. This is unacceptable.

    That's why the Center for Biological Diversity is now asking the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service to update their current rules for uranium mines on public lands to require more thorough environmental review, groundwater monitoring and inspections, as well as more limited permitting and clear deadlines for when to begin reclamation once a mine is closed.

    Take action below -- sign our petition to protect the Grand Canyon from uranium mining.

  • Oppose Aggressive Hunting of Washington's Cougars
    Cougar
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    Stealthy, solitary and highly adaptable, mountain lions are incredible survivors. But even so, they're unlikely to escape the killing campaign Washington wildlife officials have in store for them -- unless we speak up.

    At its April meeting, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission voted to increase cougar hunting quotas by a staggering 50 percent in several key areas, catering to vocal special interests who want to eliminate predators from the landscape.

    But a 13-year study in the state has shown that hunting at these aggressive rates will actually tilt the cougar population toward younger males, who are more likely to engage in livestock conflicts than animals in stable, older populations.

    Take action below -- demand that the commission reverse its scientifically indefensible, knee-jerk decision to kill more cougars.

  • Stop the Attacks on the Endangered Species Act
    President Obama

    Over the past few years, the Obama administration has been quietly chipping away at the Endangered Species Act with attempts to alter key parts that have helped this bedrock law prevent extinction for 99 percent of the species it protects.

    Not since the Reagan presidency has an administration pushed changes that so severely undermine this critical law. Without it, it's scary to think where the bald eagle, American alligator and hundreds of other rare wildlife species would be today.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has recently pushed four regulatory changes to the Act that make it easier to destroy critical habitat, limit the number of species that qualify for protection, exempt federal agencies from limiting harm to endangered species under overarching management plans and severely limit citizens' ability to petition for species needing help.

    Take action below -- tell President Obama that his administration must reject these changes that would weaken the law. A strong Endangered Species Act is essential to halting the current wildlife extinction crisis.

  • Viva la Vaquita

    VaquitaMexico's Islands and Protected Areas of the Gulf of California is truly an incredible place, teeming with wildlife and stunning for its rugged islands and beaches. That's why the area was granted World Heritage status in 2005.

    Yet, despite the honor, two of the site's most treasured species -- the vaquita and totoaba -- could soon be extinct.

    The vaquita is the world's smallest and most endangered porpoise, with fewer than 100 remaining. For years they've been snared in shrimp nets. But increasingly, vaquitas are also caught in illegal nets set to catch totoaba, an endangered fish. The totoaba's bladder is in high demand for traditional Asian medicine, and the black-market trade has made the situation worse.

    The UNESCO World Heritage Committee is tasked with monitoring its protected areas and can list any site as "in danger" if there's a serious decline in the endangered species, such as the vaquita and totoaba, the property was established to protect. An "in danger" designation could provide the much-needed push to focus international attention on these species, oversee Mexico's protection efforts and garner funds for the area's conservation.

    Take action below -- help save vaquitas and the totoaba by signing our petition to the World Heritage Committee.

  • No More Oil for Broken Coastal Pipeline
    Platform Holly near Santa Barbara
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    Safeguarded from new oil leases as a result of the horrific 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill, the California Coastal Sanctuary is once again at risk. The California State Lands Commission is considering a request from an oil company that wants to drill in these currently protected waters. 

    Tell the commission to say no to this brazen proposal and keep this oil in the ground.

    New drilling would dramatically increase oil production from offshore platforms and feed more crude into the exact same decades-old pipeline system that failed on May 19, spilling more than 100,000 gallons of oil near Santa Barbara.

    Expanding the lifespan of an aging offshore oil platform that should be retired risks another spill and will only deepen our climate crisis.

    Take action below -- urge Gov. Brown and the State Lands Commission to do the right thing and reject Venoco's application.

  • The Dirtiest Deal You've Never Heard Of
    Democracy protest
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    On Wednesday, June 3, U.S. activist groups representing a broad range of interests are coordinating a massive call-in to Congress to stop a disastrous bill that would "fast track" international trade deals, tip the scales in favor of multinational corporations and cut the public out of decision-making.

    Please make a quick call to your representative to stop this now.

    The specter behind "fast track" is the Trans-Pacific Partnership -- a proposed trade agreement between the United States and 11 other countries, meant to counter China's rising economic influence. Foreign corporations don't want to be held accountable to the American public or U.S. Congress, so they're trying to fast-track highly controversial decisions. This is not how democracy works.

    There are many things wrong with fast-track, but one concrete way that it could affect you or someone you know is by bringing fracking to more U.S. communities. One of TPP's main goals is to ramp up U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas to Asia. That fracked gas could come from your town -- and your town could be sued under this trade deal if it tried to protect itself from this toxic practice.

    Please call your representative now to stop this dangerous deal in its tracks.

    Here's a sample script for your call. Type in your ZIP code to get your representative's phone number.

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______. I'm calling to urge you to reject all legislation granting "fast track" trading authority. The proposal that just passed the Senate tips the scales in favor of multinational corporations, cuts the public out of decision-making and strips Congress' power to make crucial amendments to highly controversial deals such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership. At stake are a host of U.S. laws which could be negated under this trade deal.

  • Stop BLM's Plan to Double Off-road Traffic in West Mojave
    Mojave fringe-toed lizard
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    A recent Bureau of Land Management proposal to fully double off-road vehicle miles in the western Mojave Desert is as outrageous as it sounds. The agency's plan allots 10,428 miles to roads for dirt bikes and four-wheelers -- the distance between Alaska and Tierra Del Fuego in South America -- when what the area needs is fewer routes, not more.

    More ORV routes will further degrade desert streams, increase soil erosion and worsen air quality problems. And these routes will tear up habitat used by imperiled wildlife such as desert tortoises, Mojave fringe-toed lizards and Lane Mountain milkvetch.

    A 2005 court order specifically requires BLM to apply minimization criteria when designating routes, but the agency's draft plan fails on all accounts.

    Act now to tell BLM to protect this fragile country full of rare wildlife, silence and stark beauty -- not turn it into a noisy and polluted ORV free-for-all.

  • Call Off the Florida Black Bear Hunt
    Florida black bear
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    In 2012 wildlife managers removed Florida black bears from the state's list of threatened species -- a sign that these unique bears were no longer at risk of imminent extinction. What it didn't mean is that these bears were in the clear (they still suffer from habitat loss, genetic isolation and road mortality). And what's deeply upsetting is how the state could now propose a trophy hunt.

    Unless stopped, trophy hunters could kill hundreds of Florida black bears each year starting this October.

    Although offered as a solution for human-bear conflicts, hunting bears in the deep woods will do nothing to prevent bears in suburbs from getting into trash. Instead, state managers should let these bears live and they should focus on proven, nonlethal methods for preventing conflict, such as bear-proof trashcans.

    Take action below --  urge Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to call off this hunt. Then join us at a grassroots meeting in your area June 16, 17 or 18 and attend the next commission meeting in Sarasota on June 24.

  • Keep Oregon's Rivers Clean and Clear of Mining
    Suction dredging
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    Suction dredge mining poses an increasing threat to Oregon's world-renowned fish and waterways. This form of mining clogs rivers and streams with platoon-like rafts, each equipped with a motor and hose used to suck up gravel from the stream bottom. Flecks of gold are sorted out, and the remaining sediment is then dumped back into the stream.

    The harms of this kind of mining are many and well known. In addition to being noisy and intrusive, suction dredging muddies streams and stirs up toxic plumes of mercury -- making clear mountain waters unfit for people to swim in and for fish and amphibians to live in.

    Oregon has started to take steps to crack down on this harmful hobby mining -- but what's still needed is a tough law with clear rules.

    Act now to urge your elected officials to support S.B. 830 -- to clarify this issue and strengthen protections for our rivers and wildlife by requiring all miners to first obtain a permit under the Clean Water Act.

  • Bring Back the Bears
    Bring Back the Bears

    Grizzly bears once roamed across California for centuries -- from the state's mountains to its valleys and beaches. But decades of persecution drove them off the landscape, and the last grizzly in California was tragically shot in 1924.

    Now it's time to bring the bears back.

    We're calling on the California Fish and Game Commission to consider options to reintroduce grizzlies in California's Sierra Nevada, where there are 8,000 square miles of prime habitat.

    Grizzlies today survive in just a few pockets in the Rocky Mountains -- roughly 4 percent of their historic range in the lower 48. If these endangered bears are going to truly recover, they need to be returned to more of their native homes in the American West (remote places typically far away from people).

    Grizzlies are so iconic in California that they're on the state flag -- even if they are no longer on the land. Please sign our petition to return California grizzly bears and a renewed sense of the wild to the Golden State.

  • How Many More Oil Spills Will We Have to See?

    Santa Barbara oil spillIt's the worst kind of déjà vu: On May 19 yet another major oil spill had cleanup crews fanned out along Santa Barbara's Refugio State Beach, stained black by tens of thousands of gallons of crude oil. The damage done to the homes of wildlife like pelicans, sea otters and humpback whales is heartbreaking.

    Since 1986 more than 600 oil and gas pipeline leaks, spills and other incidents in the Golden State have caused at least $769 million in damages, 200 injuries and almost 50 deaths. We will never be safe from tragedies like these until we end fossil fuel development altogether.

    Yet Gov. Brown, despite having declared a state of emergency in response to the most recent Santa Barbara spill, continues to support an expansion of fracking and other dangerous oil drilling in our state, deepening the climate crisis and increasing the chances of yet another catastrophe.

    Take action below -- sign our petition urging Gov. Brown to get us off this oil spill treadmill. Tell him to ban fracking and other dangerous oil activities in California. 

  • Washington's Wolves Under Attack -- Help Now
    Gray wolf
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    In the past few years Washington's Department of Fish and Wildlife has acted in ways that seriously call into question the agency's motives.

    In 2012 and 2014, agency officials killed the Wedge pack and the only breeding female of the Huckleberry pack for conflicts with livestock without fully trying nonlethal measures. And since 2012 the agency has actively lobbied the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to strip federal protections from the state's wolves.

    Now we've learned that the department's Director James Unsworth recently wrote a letter to a congressman urging him to help strip federal protections from wolves in Washington wherever these animals are protected by the Endangered Species Act.

    The director's move reeks of backdoor politics, but its logic -- that killing more wolves will lead to fewer livestock conflicts -- is also just wrong. Washington State University researchers recently published a scientific paper debunking this myth: Fragmenting wolf packs actually increases the incidence of livestock depredations.

    Take action below -- urge Governor Jay Inslee to redirect his Department of Fish and Wildlife so that its focus is working with stakeholders to build trust through transparency, accountability and the use of sound science.

  • Tell Top Obama Officials to Meet With Tribes Over Grizzly Protection
    Yellowstone grizzly
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    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service continues to push to end federal protection for grizzlies that live in and around Yellowstone National Park.

    But tribal leaders in the West are calling on top wildlife officials in the Obama administration to delay plans to remove federal protections for Yellowstone's grizzlies and instead attend a summit this summer, both to hear the tribes' opposition to stripping protection from grizzlies and to show respect for their nations and cultures.

    Take action below to urge Interior Secretary Sally Jewell and Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe to do just that.

    The request follows a Northern Cheyenne tribal representative being forcibly stopped from speaking by the state-federal grizzly bear committee when he attempted to announce the tribe's opposition to stripping Endangered Species Act protection from the bears.

    In a letter to Jewell and Ashe, the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council said the Fish and Wildlife Service has "continued to ignore" some 35 tribal resolutions and declarations raising concerns about stripping protection from grizzlies that live in and around Yellowstone National Park.

    Not only is an apology warranted after the incident in Wyoming, but it's time for the Interior Department to do what's right. Tribes have a longstanding cultural connection with the region's grizzlies and deserve to be fully heard before any further steps are taken to strip the bears' protections.

    Take action below -- tell Ashe and Jewell to put delisting plans on hold for Yellowstone's grizzlies and attend the tribal summit this summer.

  • Stop the Navy's Plan to Bomb a Pacific Paradise
    Northern Mariana Islands
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    As part of a larger move to expand war training in American waters and territories throughout the world, the U.S. Navy is planning to ramp up war games on two islands in the Pacific's Northern Mariana Islands -- Tinian and Pagan -- a deadly proposal we need your help to stop.

    Under the Navy's current plan, expanded military activities will include air-to-ground assaults, live-fire weapons training, bombing exercises, and amphibious warfare. The activities are expected to destroy key habitat for corals, sea turtles, marine mammals, and the imperiled Tinian monarch. And of course it's also a nightmare for the 3,000 residents of Tinian Island, as well as the 3,000 native islanders of Pagan who seek to return after being evacuated due to a volcano eruption.

    And lest the Navy forget: as it works to protect national security, it also has a duty not to harm the heritage it's fighting for -- including minimizing the harm it does to endangered wildlife and habitat.

    Take action below -- urge the U.S. Navy to meaningfully evaluate all the harms of its war games and choose the "no-action" alternative that won't bomb these Northern Mariana islands.

  • Keep California's Rivers Clean and Clear of Mining
    Suction dredging
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    Suction dredge mining has been a scourge in California for years. This form of mining peppers rivers and streams with platoon-like rafts, each equipped with a motor and hose used to suck up gravel from the stream bottom. Flecks of gold are sorted out, and the remaining sediment is then dumped back into the stream.

    The harms of this kind of mining are many and well known. In addition to being noisy and intrusive, suction dredging muddies streams and stirs up toxic plumes of mercury -- making clear mountain waters unfit for people to swim in and for fish and amphibians to live in.

    That's why in 2009 California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger enacted a moratorium on the practice -- and three years later Gov. Jerry Brown affirmed it. Miners are still out there polluting our rivers, however, because of confusion about state vs. federal law.

    Take action below -- urge your elected officials to clarify this issue and reinforce protection for our rivers with a law requiring all miners to first obtain a permit under the Clean Water Act.

  • Protect Grand Canyon From Sprawl and Pollution
    Grand Canyon
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    Planning for the future will be no easy road for Arizona's Department of Transportation. But the path the agency's on now will fail to provide for the state's growing population and preserve the area's incredible natural resources.

    Instead of focusing on smart public transit projects and roadway improvements to reduce traffic and pollution and create wildlife corridors, the agency is proposing to spend millions on an unnecessary airport expansion that would further burden Grand Canyon National Park.

    The results are predictable and have been written across the land too many times: An expanded airport will bring more noise, cars, people and air pollution to the canyon -- and the development it would incentivize could permanently dry up sacred Havasu Falls and the park's many seeps and springs.

    Take action below -- tell ADOT that its plan to expand the Grand Canyon airport is a waste of taxpayer money at the expense of more important needs throughout Arizona.

  • Power Plants and National Parks Don't Mix
    Coral in Biscayne National Park
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    The proposed expansion of a nuclear power plant at Turkey Point in South Florida shows almost total disregard for context: Within six miles of the proposed site are two national parks, an aquatic preserve, a wetland preserve and a national wildlife refuge. And because it is Florida's coast, the chance that sea-level rise will wreak havoc on nuclear plans is unacceptably high.

    The half-life of the main fissile fuel, U-235, is 703.8 million years. And plutonium, another nuclear byproduct, is also extremely toxic. These substances will require secure storage for a very long time in an area likely to be heavily hit by increasing sea-level rise and hurricanes.

    To run the plant will require 90 million gallons a day of Miami-Dade's wastewater for cooling. And though "treated" -- this wastewater is still likely to include dangerous chemicals that will be vented as hot steam via the reactors. Even in small amounts, this mist is not something you want in your body.

    And if there isn't enough wastewater to cool the reactors? The plan is to drill wells into the aquifer -- a move scientists have said could lead to saltwater intrusion and jeopardize the area's freshwater supply.

    Take action below -- tell the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that, given Turkey Point's location and all the threats, it must deny this project's permit.

  • Bring Back the Panthers
    Florida panther
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    Florida panthers once roamed throughout the Southeast, but today they're restricted to less than 5 percent of their historic range in a single population in South Florida.

    Recovery has been slow, but there have been gains. Today there are an estimated 100 to 180 wild panthers -- up from just a dozen or so in the early 1970s. These panthers, however, continue to face numerous threats due to our increasing human population and relentless development. And it's sickening, but dozens of these cats are still lost each year to collisions with cars.

    The limiting factors for panther recovery are habitat availability, prey availability and lack of human tolerance. Which is why any strategy to bring back this big cat must work to not only maintain, restore and expand the existing panther population and its habitat but add at least two new populations outside South Florida.

    Act now to tell your state and federal wildlife officials they have your full support to move forward with panther reintroduction. Then watch this cool video and learn more about the Center's work to save panthers.

  • Tell Your Senators: Don't Hand Over Our Public Lands to Industry
    Sage grouse
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    It's no secret that Tea Party senators want to turn over our public lands to the oil, gas, timber, mining and livestock industries. But their latest attempt to do so by legislative fiat -- by proposing riders on a must-pass military spending bill -- brings political meddling to a new low.

    Thursday's vote is our chance to block dangerous provisions from the bill and stand up for our public lands and endangered species. Please call your senators by 12 p.m. EST on Thursday, June 11, and urge them to oppose the following amendments, if offered: Gardner (#1709), Lee (#1687), McCain (#1633) and Flake (#1715).

    You can leave your message with the receptionist or at the office's voicemail after hours. Just remember to be quick and polite -- and to include your name and where you're from.

    Here's a sample script for your call. Type in your ZIP code to get your senators' phone numbers.

    Hi, my name is ______, and I live in ______. I'm calling to urge you to oppose any amendment that may be offered on the National Defense Authorization Act that would turn over management of my public lands to states, waive environmental laws in the name of border security or harm endangered species. Specifically, I am very concerned about the following amendments should they be offered for a vote on the Senate floor: Gardner (#1709), Lee (#1687), McCain (#1633) and Flake (#1715).

    I care deeply about our public lands and wildlife. These amendments have nothing to do with military readiness and should not be included in the bill. They would weaken protections for sage grouse and other endangered species and are a bald attempt to allow oil, gas and other industries greater access to our public lands.


    After you've made your call, look up your senators' social media accounts and send them a Tweet and a Facebook post urging them to protect #OurLands by opposing these amendments to the #NDAA if they come up for a vote: Gardner (#1709), Lee (#1687), McCain (#1633) and Flake (#1715).

  • Does Your Orange Contain Fracking Chemicals?

    OrangeThe Los Angeles Times just published a frightening exposé showing that some of California's crops -- which make up more than half of the nation's produce -- are being grown with oil-contaminated wastewater.

    Please help us stop this scandal now.
     
    In the midst of a historic drought, Big Oil is making millions of dollars selling this toxic oil waste to California farmers desperate for water -- a deal which raises huge questions about the safety of our food supply.

    State agencies and local water boards test for some contaminants but not all -- and, of course, you can never find what you're not looking for. Scientists at Water Defense have proven, however, that methylene chloride and other carcinogens are in the wastewater that feeds these crops.
     
    Take action below -- sign our petition urging Gov. Jerry Brown to halt fracking in California and fully investigate this scandal before more companies gain permits for similar programs and cause irreversible damage to our crops and health.   

  • Tell @Potus: #LeadthePack, Save America's Wolves

    #LeadThePackAmerica’s wolves are at a critical point. Although they’ve been brought back from the brink of extinction, wolves in the lower 48 states today occupy less than 10 percent of their historic range.

    And yet politicians are gunning for wolves once again, eager to abandon 40 years’ of wolf recovery and return to an era of hunting, trapping and cruel persecution.

    It’s time for President Obama to stand up for America’s wolves.
    Tell him today to reject any plan to strip Endangered Species Act protections. We’ve come too far to turn our backs on these incredible animals.

    Send the three Tweets below to President Obama and the White House, then sign our petition calling on the President to #LeadthePack and protect America's wolves.

    • .@Potus: #LeadthePack:! Protect America’s #Wolves: http://ow.ly/MCtp0
    • Urge @Potus and @WhiteHouse to #LeadthePack and protect our #wolves: http://ow.ly/MCtp0
    • Hey @Potus: I love America's #Wolves! #LeadthePack and keep them protected: http://ow.ly/MCtp0

  • Tell the Service It Must Do Better for Bats
    Northern long-eared bat with white-nose syndrome
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    Northern long-eared bats are amazing little creatures that can eat their own weight in insects each night. But in recent years a terrible disease called white-nose syndrome has been laying waste to whole bat colonies across 26 states and five provinces. In several populations as many as 99 percent of the bats have died.  

    In response the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service first proposed safeguarding these bats as "endangered" in October 2013. But since then the timber, oil, gas and mining industries have mustered political leaders to their side and painted a picture of economic devastation if full protections came to pass.

    Unfortunately, in its recent final rule the Service backpedaled on its plan -- weakening protections and giving logging and other potentially harmful activities a free pass, despite the agency's projection that white-nose syndrome will overrun the bat's entire range in about 10 years.

    Take action below -- tell the Service that its plan to save bats by catering to business isn't good enough. The agency must use this last comment period to change course and give these bats the strong protections they urgently need to escape extinction.

  • Save Our Snakes From Senseless Slaughter
    Eastern diamondback rattlesnake

    In most towns it'd be considered unthinkably cruel to have a contest where citizens catch and kill an animal with no limit. But in the Southeast two rattlesnake "roundups" still exist where killing wildlife is supposed fun.

    The target of the two roundups in Whigham, Ga., and Opp, Ala., is the rare eastern diamondback rattlesnake. Populations of the snake have been so destroyed that, following a Center petition, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that these rattlers may need protection as an endangered species.

    Rattlesnakes play a key role in the food web, especially in terms of rodent control. And because hunters often use gasoline to drive snakes from their dens, roundups are also harmful to hundreds of other species that share the dens as a home.

    Urge the mayors of Whigham, Ga., and Opp, Ala., to convert their roundups into wildlife-friendly festivals where no snakes are killed.

  • Protect Grand Canyon From Proposed Mega-mall
    Havasupai Falls, Grand Canyon
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    When President Teddy Roosevelt protected the Grand Canyon in 1908, he said: "Leave it as it is. You cannot improve on it."

    Such words ring hauntingly true now that Stilo, a multinational developer, is planning to bring a mega-mall directly to the Grand Canyon's doorstep in Tusayan, Ariz.

    The proposed complex near the South Rim would suburbanize this area around the park. But more importantly it would permanently alter water flows that feed the park's sacred seeps and springs, including Havasu Falls.

    The Forest Service is currently deciding whether to grant the access that would allow this development to move forward. But without a large public outcry, the agency is unlikely to stand up to this rich developer.

    Take action below -- demand that the Forest Service deny this developer right-of-way access and protect America's greatest natural treasure.

  • Stop the TV Show Whose Contestants Killed an Endangered Species

    American crocodileA British reality TV show called "The Island with Bear Grylls" recently aired an episode where contestants killed and ate an endangered American crocodile. We need you to tell the show's producers that such cruel treatment of endangered wildlife won't be tolerated.

    Although nearly all countries with crocodiles now prohibit hunting, these prehistoric-looking creatures were driven to near extinction by overexploitation for their hides -- and now illegal hunting, as well as habitat loss, continues to threaten their survival.

    Under the Endangered Species Act, the American crocodile is protected as threatened in Florida and endangered in the rest of its range, which extends through the Caribbean and Central America into South America.

    Take action below -- sign our petition demanding that Channel 4 cancel the show, pull the episode from its website, and offset some of the harm it caused by donating money to protect endangered wildlife in Panama, where the series is filmed.  

  • End the Delays to Protect West Coast Fishers
    Fisher
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    Fishers once roamed widely from the piney forests of British Columbia to Southern California's montane chaparral. But now, after decades of intense logging and trapping, these furry weasels are barely hanging on in just five small, scattered populations on the West Coast.

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed to protect these fishers as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. But now the agency's pulling back and asking for a delay -- a potentially very bad sign.

    The Service may be considering limiting protection to fishers in southern populations, while denying help for others to the north. The agency may also be questioning the threat of toxic rodenticides. Well, it's real and startlingly pervasive: 84 percent of fishers tested in California showed positive exposure to these poisons.

    Take action below -- urge the Service to stop delaying and protect all fishers and their habitat on the West Coast.

  • Tell Congress: Don't Trash Our Borderlands
    U.S. Border Patrol in Arizona
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    After the Dept. of Homeland Security invoked the REAL ID Act of 2005 to waive dozens of environmental laws and speed construction of the U.S.-Mexico border wall, the result set a dangerous precedent.

    Hundreds of miles of the border were blocked off with little or no environmental review -- and massive problems with erosion and flooding ensued, as did as a total breakdown in normal movement for the area's wildlife.

    Unfortunately some of our nation's elected leaders weren't paying attention. And now Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Rep. Matt Salmon (R-Ariz.) are leading the charge to expand this shortsighted and disastrous waiver authority to include all laws with regard to all border-security activities on all public lands in Arizona. If they have their way, the Border Patrol will be allowed to run roughshod all over our national parks, forests, monuments and wildlife refuges.

    This harmful waiver is completely unnecessary, since Border Patrol already has full access to these lands and has stated publicly that it doesn't need this waiver authority.

    Take action below -- urge Congress to oppose any legislation that would surrender the real treasures of our wild borderlands to the fleeting illusion of border security.

  • Protect Puget Sound's Wild Steelhead
    Steelhead trout
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    Puget Sound's famous steelhead runs are an irreplaceable treasure for the state of Washington. But they're now at risk of disappearing because of a combination of threats including dams, logging, urban sprawl and overreliance on hatcheries. 

    Under the Endangered Species Act, hatcheries are supposed to develop management plans that minimize the genetic harms that can arise from mixing artificially bred fish into wild populations. And NOAA is supposed to approve these plans only after a thorough review. 

    For years, however, NOAA has failed to meet these requirements. And now the agency is rushing the process by performing a quick "environmental assessment."

    Take action below -- urge NOAA to conduct a full "environmental impact statement" for all Puget Sound hatcheries and, ultimately, phase out the use of hatcheries to replace wild steelhead.

  • Kick King Coal Off Our Public Land
    Raggeds Wilderness, Colorado
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    The dangerous disconnect between the Obama administration's climate rhetoric and its actions on fossil fuel leasing just got worse.

    If the U.S. Forest Service has its way, it'll OK a loophole within the 2012 Colorado Roadless Rule and open 19,000 acres of backcountry to coal mining. The result? Half a billion tons of new carbon pollution.

    Arch Coal, the nation's second-largest coal company, is the beneficiary of the plan. It'd get to drill and build roads in otherwise-protected forest in western Colorado. The losers in the plan are goshawks, elk, beaver and other wildlife whose habitat would be destroyed. And then us, of course -- some of our last, best public lands would suffer from the mining and eventual burning of this dirty fossil fuel.
     
    Take action below -- demand that the Forest Service withdraw this dangerous plan and instead protect this beautiful Colorado backcountry for future generations.

  • Keep This Crawdad From Extinction
    Big Sandy crayfish
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    Amid the ancient hills of Appalachia, two tiny crayfish are neck deep in mining pollution -- and now they need your voice to survive.

    The Big Sandy and Guyandotte River crayfish are fast disappearing due to water pollution, primarily from coal mining. The Guyandotte River crayfish, a newly discovered species in West Virginia, now exists in just a single stream, making it the most endangered crayfish in North America. And the Big Sandy crayfish lives only in the mountains of West Virginia, Virginia and Kentucky.

    Both crayfish are sensitive to pollution -- and if you've seen the mining wreckage, you know why. Their homes are being inundated with sedimentation and heavy metals like selenium.

    Protecting the clean water these crayfish need will also help the people of Appalachia where public health has long been sacrificed to dirty coal. Recent scientific studies have concluded unsurprisingly that pollution from mountaintop-removal mining is associated with risk of cancer and birth defects in humans. More than 2,000 miles of streams have been degraded by the coal industry, which employs few people and perpetuates poverty by causing permanent damage to the landscape.

    Without immediate Endangered Species Act protection, the Big Sandy and Guyandotte River crayfish will be lost to extinction. Please help save them by taking action below.

  • Tell Gov. Brown to Shut Down Illegal Wells and Ban Fracking

    Fracking protestCalifornia communities have been ordered to make huge water-use cuts to fight drought, but the state's plan gives oil companies a free pass to continue using and contaminating huge amounts of water.

    Every day illegal disposal wells dump about 27 million gallons of toxic oil waste into protected aquifers. And on top of these risks to our water supply, injecting oil wastewater underground can trigger earthquakes.

    We can't sit back as the oil industry continues to poison our precious water and jeopardize public safety. We don't need a gradual phaseout of these wells, and creating new loopholes to allow currently protected aquifers to be used as garbage dumps for the oil industry isn't a solution. We're suffering the worst drought in recorded history, and so we need Gov. Brown to immediately halt these illegal activities.

    Take action below -- sign our petition urging Gov. Brown to shut down these illegal wells and immediately ban fracking in California.

  • Keep Oregon's Wolves Protected
    OR-7's wolf pup
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    Under Oregon's state wolf plan, once there are four breeding pairs for three consecutive years, the state can conduct a status review and decide whether to delist wolves from the state Endangered Species Act.

    And while it's true that Oregon's wolves have just reached those numbers, recovery of the species is still a long way off. A scientific habitat study has shown that the state could support 1,450 wolves -- but today only 77 exist there.

    Wolves in Oregon also continue to face threats to their existence from foes in the livestock and hunting industries, as well as from poachers. So before Oregon strips wolves of protections, it must ensure it has done all it can to eliminate these threats.

    Take action below -- tell the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission that wolf recovery is nowhere near complete. And very importantly, please be sure to personalize your note with a few sentences of your own in support of wolf protections.

  • Protect California's Deserts With New National Monuments
    Mount San Gorgonio, California
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    Thanks to years of work by California Senator Dianne Feinstein, two national monuments to forever protect the state's unparalleled deserts are in the making -- now they just need public support.

    The Sand to Snow National Monument would protect some of the most beautiful and ecologically important lands in California -- from the desert floor to the 11,503-foot peak of Mount San Gorgonio. It'd also safeguard the headwaters of the Santa Ana and Whitewater rivers -- upon which hundreds of thousands of Californians rely for drinking water.

    Designating the Mojave Trails National Monument is also a must if wildlife are to freely move, adapt and survive in the face of climate change. With a few changes, this monument could help connect and protect lands between Joshua Tree National Park and Mojave National Preserve.

    Take action below -- thank Senator Feinstein for her leadership but ask her to complete her vision for protecting California's deserts by expanding the boundaries of the Mojave Trails National Monument to create connectivity between these lands.

  • Minnesota: Save Your Bees, Please
    Bee
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    Neonicotinoids, or "neonics," are fast becoming the most popular and widely used class of pesticides in the world, such that up to a third of all soybean seeds and 90 percent of corn seeds are now treated with these chemicals.

    That's a major problem. In the lab it's been shown that, if these chemicals don't kill bees outright, they can impair the animals' ability to learn, remember, forage, navigate and fight disease.

    Since bees and other pollinators are responsible for up to 35 percent of world food production, the use of neonics must be immediately reevaluated on a global scale. The European Union has already implemented a two-year moratorium on neonics starting in December 2013. And now Minnesota is poised to enact legislation that will halt the use of these harmful toxins in the state.

    Take action below -- tell Minnesota's lawmakers that you support their effort to place a moratorium on neonic pesticides that harm our bees, our food and our planet.

  • Protect Florida's Waters From Seismic Blasting
    Dolphins
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    Imagine the noise, constant and unrelenting, of an airgun as loud as a jet engine blasting every ten seconds for months on end.

    That's what whales, dolphins and sea turtles will be punished with if oil companies have their way and seismic testing is conducted off the Atlantic Coast. After the acoustic smog clears, these companies will then move in and begin drilling for oil.

    We can't let this happen. The government has acknowledged that these noise blasts will hurt as many as 138,000 marine mammals, including some of Earth's last remaining Atlantic right whales. And the last thing Florida needs is another Deepwater Horizon.

    Take action below -- tell Gov. Rick Scott not to gamble our coasts and marine life for a few more drops of oil.

    Then if you're able, join us for a rally against seismic blasting in Jacksonville on Tuesday, April 21.

  • EPA Poised to Approve New, Toxic Pesticide for Corn -- Take Action
    Cornfield
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    The EPA is about to approve a new herbicide for use on corn, and it's a most toxic brew. Two of the four active ingredients include bicyclopyrone and atrazine, posing well known risks to wildlife and people even at miniscule doses.

    In addition to poisoning bees and butterflies along the way, pesticides can disrupt food webs and cause reproductive problems in amphibians and fish.

    That's why the Endangered Species Act requires federal agencies, including the EPA, to consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service before taking any action that could harm protected species.

    But tragically the EPA often shirks this rule -- taking the easy way out and simply giving consent on hundreds of highly questionable chemical cocktails.

    Take action below -- demand that the EPA follow the law and consult with federal wildlife experts before approving new pesticides.

  • Tell EPA: End the Use of Toxic Dispersants
    Aerial drop of dispersants during 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster
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    The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a series of important steps to protect people, wildlife and the environment from chemical dispersants used to break apart oil after spills. These rules would place new limits on chemicals and require better testing to make sure they don't cause added harm.

    The proposal comes nearly five years after the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, the nation's largest oil spill. More than 2 million gallons of dispersant were used in response. And yet the harms of injecting such large quantities of chemicals into very deep water, as BP did, have never been studied; scientists believe it may be linked to the continued spread of underwater plumes of oil.

    It's imperative that this rule be as strong as possible to keep even more toxic chemicals out of our waters in the event of future oil spills.

    Take action below -- urge the EPA to step up the rigor of its testing; force manufacturers to make only the safest products available; and fully disclose all chemicals used in dispersants.

  • Keystone XL Defeated, Now Tell Obama to Take These 5 Steps
    Keystone XL video
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    The significance of President Obama's rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline is clear: The people's climate movement has triumphed over Big Oil. This hard-earned victory is a culmination of our collective work -- and it's just the tip of the iceberg of what we can accomplish together.

    Let's build on our momentum. Sign our petition below to thank Obama for his decision on Keystone XL and urge him to do more.

    The president doesn't need to wait for Congress to act on the climate crisis. Here are five key steps he should take right now: Commit to a science-based U.S. target for carbon pollution cuts ahead of the next international climate summit; fix the Clean Power Plan by eliminating the free pass for natural gas and fracking; cut greenhouse pollution from airplanes and other unregulated sources; halt new fossil fuel development on public lands; and protect our climate and oceans by halting offshore fracking.

    We're celebrating the rejection of Keystone XL today, but if we're going to have a livable climate for tomorrow, we know there's more work to be done. Tell President Obama to build on his decision and tackle the climate crisis.

  • Protect Old-growth Forests From Post-fire Logging
    Happy Camp fire in Klamath National Forest
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    The Klamath Mountains in Northern California and southwestern Oregon are globally outstanding for their biodiversity. The forest is home to 200 miles of rivers rushing through wilderness and old-growth trees, which provide vital homes to at-risk species like coho salmon, northern spotted owls and Pacific fishers.

    The area experienced a fire last summer of the type that's common historically. But instead of allowing the land to naturally recover, the Forest Service is planning to exploit the fires to push an extreme logging plan that calls for clearcutting old-growth trees.

    This type of move would fail any Fire Science 101 course, and it surely ought to fail to gain your support for wise use of our public lands.

    Take action below -- stand with native tribes, watershed councils and fire ecologists and tell the Forest Service to obey its own rules protecting critical wildlife habitat from salvage logging.

  • Speak Up for Michigan's Wolves
    Gray wolf
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    The future for wolf recovery in Michigan will be decided in the next few weeks and depends largely on whether the state's wildlife officials can finalize a science-based management plan with the tools to avoid livestock conflicts and promote coexistence with people.

    The alternative is that a new wolf "management" plan issued by the state -- focused on sport hunting and lethal control -- could lead to population declines, as seen in Wyoming, Idaho and Wisconsin. Lost would be all the years of progress made by this endangered species. We can't let that happen.

    Now that the state's wildlife officials are seeking public comment on their new draft plan, they need to hear your support for wolves and for farmers getting the tools they need to prevent livestock depredations via nonlethal measures.

    Take action below -- tell Michigan's Department of Natural Resources that you support a management plan focused on continued wolf recovery.

  • Make Florida Frack-free
    Alligator
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    Florida may be world renowned for its beaches, its sun, and its abundance of wildlife like alligators, sea turtles and panthers. But, with your help, one thing it'll never be known for is fracking.

    Please take a moment now to let your elected officials know you support clean water and an immediate ban on fracking in the state.

    Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is the dangerous process of blasting huge volumes of water mixed with toxic chemicals underground to crack open rock formations and extract oil and gas. And the fracking-induced oil and gas boom has transformed the American energy landscape, undercutting clean energy and furthering our addiction to fossil fuels while polluting our air, wasting water and threatening wildlife.

    Four bills now in the Florida state legislature -- House Bills 1205 and 1209, as well as Senate Bills 1468 and 1582 -- would allow the amount of water and chemicals used in fracking to be hidden as "trade secrets," and, more importantly, let this dangerous practice continue. Supporters of the bills claim that at least some regulation is better than none, but they ignore the fact that two other bills call for a complete ban on fracking in the state -- House Bill 169 and Senate Bill 166.

    Take action below --  urge your elected officials to support clean water and a ban on fracking in Florida. And if you can, please personalize your note.

  • Help Make the Cibola a Refuge for Wildlife
    Northern aplomado falcon
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    Whether you have a long and storied history in New Mexico or still hope to visit its wild places and creatures someday, the time to stand up for this land of enchantment is now. The U.S. Forest Service is working on a new plan to determine the future of the state's Cibola National Forest.

    Because you support the Center, we know you value biodiversity. But unfortunately our national forests are too often sacrificed in political struggles to appease those who'd like to log, drive over and mine all our public lands.

    That's why we need you to tell the Forest Service to protect this area as a refuge for wildlife and quiet recreation.

    Take action below -- submit to the Forest Service our six-point guide to improve forest management, or craft your own letter for what you wish to see on these public lands.

  • Protect California's New Lead-Free Hunting Law
    California condor
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    The NRA and its cronies have cooked up a new bill for the California state legislature to repeal the historic 2013 law protecting condors, eagles and other wildlife from preventable lead poisoning.

    Please help us stop this bill in its tracks.

    Toxic lead from hunting ammunition in the form of bullet fragments and spent shot enters the food chain and exacts a deadly toll on wildlife. Lead is a potent neurotoxin -- it's not safe for any animal, including humans, at any level of exposure. We've removed lead from our homes, gas tanks and children's toys -- and now California is leading the way in removing toxic lead from the food chain by fully transitioning to nontoxic ammunition by 2019.

    And we know the new regulations can work: Since 2008 the Golden State has required the use of nonlead bullets for hunting in southern and central California in the California condor range, and over the past seven years hunters have easily made the switch.

    Take action below -- send a message to your legislators to stop Assembly Bill 395 and let California's lead-free law work.

  • Stand Up for American Caribou
    Caribou
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    The caribou of Washington and Idaho's Selkirk Mountains are truly creatures of winter. With dinner-plate-sized hooves for snow-trekking and an ability to survive for months on little but lichens, it seems as if nothing could faze these animals.

    But despite their adaptive traits, the lower 48's only population of caribou is now at risk of forever disappearing due to small size and weak habitat protections from, among other things, increased snowmobile-use in their home. As a result, fewer than 20 caribou still walk the U.S. side of the international line.

    This would be cause for despair, but we know what these caribou need to rebound: continued recognition as an endangered species, added numbers from nearby herds, and protected habitat they can call home.

    Take action below -- urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service not to give up hope for recovering American caribou.

  • Give Right Whales the Habitat They Need
    North Atlantic right whale
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    With fewer than 500 individuals remaining, North Atlantic right whales are one of the most endangered species on Earth. And yet only a tiny portion of this massive whale's expansive range is protected as "critical habitat" under the Endangered Species Act. As a result, these whales have been forced to navigate an obstacle course of threats during their Atlantic migration -- fishing nets, commercial ships and deafening noise from industrial activities.

    In 2009 the Center for Biological Diversity and allies petitioned for increased protections under the Act after numerous studies revealed key feeding, migratory and nursery grounds were still vulnerable. Now it's finally time to protect these areas, and we need your help.

    The National Marine Fisheries Service has proposed to protect nearly 40,000 square miles of right whale habitat along the East Coast. But significantly, the proposal ignores the migratory corridor in the mid-Atlantic -- the route used by pregnant females heading to the Southeast to give birth to their calves, and then again as they return with newborns on their way to feed in New England. If industry has its way, nothing in the proposal will ever become final, and these waters will be protected instead for oil drilling and commercial shipping.

    Take action below -- help us keep the pressure on the Fisheries Service to do the right thing and protect the right whale's home.

  • Halt Dirty, Dangerous Offshore Drilling
    Offshore oil platform
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    Domestic oil drilling is at an all-time high, but according to a new five-year plan the Obama administration has just released, the president wants to add even more fuel to the climate fire. The Alaskan Arctic and Atlantic have largely escaped offshore drilling so far, but all that could soon change.

    Not only would new drilling leases worsen the global climate crisis, they'd risk oil spills and bring noise pollution and industrial development to places where they don't belong.

    President Obama's Interior Department predicts a 75 percent chance of a large oil spill in the Chukchi Sea if companies are allowed to drill there. We can't take that risk. Polar bears need sea ice; they don't need oil.

    Please take a moment to help protect our oceans and climate for future generations. Tell President Obama he must say no to dirty drilling now.

  • America's Biggest Methane Plume -- Take Action
    Methane flare
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    This past fall NASA scientists discovered a large red blob on a national map hovering over northwest New Mexico -- a problem, they thought, with their display. But what they'd stumbled onto was actually America's biggest methane cloud -- located directly above a landscape checkered with coal gasfields.

    Now that climate-destroying plume could get bigger and give the area an even darker black eye: The Bureau of Land Management wants to OK a crude-oil pipeline whose 50,000 barrel-per-day capacity could quadruple oil and gas fracking in the region.

    The Four Corners is already riddled by decades of oil, gas and coal pollution. Communities have suffered, and endangered fish like the Colorado pikeminnow have been poisoned. The Piñon Pipeline and its fracking would magnify those problems and threaten to industrialize ancestral Indian lands, including Chaco Canyon -- a World Heritage Site once a center of Ancestral Puebloan civilization.

    Take action below -- add your voice to the growing chorus by urging the BLM to reject this proposal and keep these fossil fuels in the ground.

  • Don't Let the Meat Industry Hijack the Food Pyramid

    Vegetable displayFor the first time ever, the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee -- the panel of experts that helps inform what goes into our national food pyramid -- has recommended that Americans eat less meat and more plant-based foods for the sake of our own health and that of the environment.

    This is a potentially game-changing recommendation. Our diets and the systems required to produce our food have a massive impact on the climate, water quality and habitat for endangered species like wolves, as well as our ability to continue producing food into the future.

    Predictably, the meat industry is lobbying to keep any recommendations to eat less meat out of the final guidelines -- which is why the Obama administration needs to hear from you that sustainability must be part of the equation.

    Take action below -- sign our petition urging our elected leaders to provide Americans with accurate, science-based food guidelines that will nourish both families and our environment. 

  • Oregon: Protect Portland's Pollinators

    BeeAll throughout the United States our country's bees, birds and pollinators are gravely threatened by the continued and widespread use of neonicotinoids. These toxic pesticides -- often applied to corn and soybean seeds, trees and plants sold in garden stores -- can make an entire plant poisonous, including its pollen and nectar.

    Acute exposure to "neonics" can cause massive bee die-offs, such as the incident in an Oregon parking lot in 2013 when 50,000 bumblebees died. Many of these chemicals have been banned in Europe, and now cities like Eugene, Ore., and Seattle, Wash., are saying no more too.

    With your help, Portland, Ore., can join these cities by passing a ban and setting a model for others soon to follow.

    Take action below -- sign our petition urging Portland's mayor and city commissioners to protect our pollinators by supporting a ban on neonicotinoids.

  • Help Bring Grizzlies Back From the Brink
    Grizzly bear
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    Ursus arctos horribilis once ranged throughout most of western North America, but by the middle of the 20th century the much-feared and much-maligned grizzly bear was nearly gone from the lower 48.  

    Since listing these bears under the Endangered Species Act in 1975, however, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has set its sights forward and identified the North Cascades as one of six areas critical to grizzly bear recovery.

    This remote terrain in Washington and British Columbia could support as many as 700 grizzly bears. But recent surveys estimate just six residents. A single bad year and the bears in this area could cease to exist.

    Take action below -- tell the National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service you support their efforts to restore grizzly bears to the North Cascades.

  • Oregon: Protect Portland's Pollinators (1st draft)
    Bee
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    All throughout the United States our country's bees, birds and pollinators are gravely threatened by the continued and widespread use of neonicotinoids. These toxic pesticides -- often applied to corn and soybean seeds, trees and plants sold in garden stores -- can make an entire plant poisonous, including its pollen and nectar.

    Acute exposure to "neonics" can cause massive bee die-offs, such as the incident in an Oregon parking lot in 2013 when 50,000 bumblebees died. Many of these chemicals have been banned in Europe, and now cities like Eugene, Ore., and Seattle, Wash., are saying no more too.

    With your help, Portland, Ore., can join these cities by passing a ban and setting a model for others soon to follow.

    Come show your support for protecting pollinators by attending the hearing on it on March 25 at 2 p.m. in Portland City Hall. Come prepared to share 2-3 minutes of testimony on why we need to pass this pollinator protection ordinance. If you have any questions, email the Center’s Environmental Health Director Lori Ann Burd.

    Then take action below -- send a short, personalized note to Portland's mayor and city commissioners telling them why you care about pollinators and support the "neonics" ban.

  • Tell Idaho: Educate Kids,